Russell County, Virginia

Last updated
Russell County
Russell County Courthouse.jpg
Russell County Courthouse in Lebanon
Map of Virginia highlighting Russell County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°56′N82°06′W / 36.94°N 82.1°W / 36.94; -82.1
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
FoundedJanuary 2, 1786
Named for William Russell
Seat Lebanon
Largest townLebanon
Area
  Total477 sq mi (1,240 km2)
  Land474 sq mi (1,230 km2)
  Water2.9 sq mi (8 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2010)
  Total28,897
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
26,748
  Density61/sq mi (23/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 9th
Website www.russellcountyva.us

Russell County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 28,897. [2] Its county seat is Lebanon. [3]

Contents

History

On January 2, 1786, Russell County was established from a section of Washington County. L.P. Summers, a Washington County historian later wrote, "Washington County lost a great extent of country and many valuable citizens when Russell County was formed." The county was named for Culpeper County native Colonel William Russell. [4] The first court met in May 1786 in the Castle's Woods settlement (present-day Castlewood) in the house of William Robinson. Later, a new place was built to house the County Seat. The structure used as a courthouse still stands, and is referred to as "The Old Courthouse." The present Courthouse, located in Lebanon, has been in use since 1874. Once vast, Russell County was split several times, giving rise to Wise County, Lee County, Tazewell County, and Scott County.

Among Russell County's most famous politicians were Daniel Boone, Governor H.C. Stuart, State Representative Boyd C. Fugate and State Senator Macon M. Long. [5] The largest cattle farm East of the Mississippi River, and one of the oldest corporations in the country, Stuart Land & Cattle, remains headquartered at Rosedale in Russell County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 477 square miles (1,240 km2), of which 474 square miles (1,230 km2) is land and 2.9 square miles (7.5 km2) (0.6%) is water. [6]

The 4th highest peak in VA is located on the eastern part of the county, Beartown Mountain.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 3,338
1800 4,80844.0%
1810 6,31931.4%
1820 5,536−12.4%
1830 6,71421.3%
1840 7,87817.3%
1850 11,91951.3%
1860 10,280−13.8%
1870 11,1038.0%
1880 13,90625.2%
1890 16,12616.0%
1900 18,03111.8%
1910 23,47430.2%
1920 26,78614.1%
1930 25,957−3.1%
1940 26,6272.6%
1950 26,8180.7%
1960 26,290−2.0%
1970 24,533−6.7%
1980 31,76129.5%
1990 28,667−9.7%
2000 30,3085.7%
2010 28,897−4.7%
Est. 201826,748 [1] −7.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790–1960 [8] 1900–1990 [9]
1990–2000 [10] 2010–2018 [1]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 30,308 people, 11,789 households, and 8,818 families residing in the county. The population density was 64 people per square mile (25/km²). There were 13,191 housing units at an average density of 28 per square mile (11/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.07% White, 3.08% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.28% from other races, and 0.40% from two or more races. 0.78% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,789 households out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.90% were married couples living together, 10.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.20% were non-families. 23.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.20% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 30.90% from 25 to 44, 26.00% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 102.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,834, and the median income for a family was $31,491. Males had a median income of $26,950 versus $20,108 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,863. About 13.00% of families and 16.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.30% of those under age 18 and 16.90% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public high schools

Fire and rescue services

Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 77.8%9,52119.0% 2,3303.2% 395
2012 67.7%8,18030.8% 3,7181.6% 190
2008 55.6%6,38942.9% 4,9321.5% 173
2004 53.2%6,07745.2% 5,1671.6% 179
2000 46.9% 5,06550.4%5,4422.7% 285
1996 36.6% 3,70653.7%5,4379.7% 985
1992 33.9% 3,89156.4%6,4809.7% 1,113
1988 40.7% 4,37457.9%6,2221.5% 157
1984 45.5% 5,73853.7%6,7600.8% 101
1980 43.9% 4,77853.0%5,7643.1% 332
1976 40.2% 4,28756.4%6,0143.4% 366
1972 58.9%5,01039.6% 3,3671.5% 125
1968 43.5%3,85840.1% 3,55416.5% 1,460
1964 40.9% 3,01258.8%4,3300.3% 25
1960 46.4% 3,04453.3%3,4960.2% 14
1956 49.1% 3,55050.4%3,6410.5% 33
1952 47.3% 2,93752.4%3,2530.3% 16
1948 46.7% 2,44751.3%2,6892.0% 107
1944 44.6% 2,38555.1%2,9450.4% 20
1940 40.0% 2,08059.8%3,1090.2% 11
1936 33.6% 1,59966.0%3,1430.4% 18
1932 29.7% 1,38670.1%3,2740.2% 11
1928 44.4% 2,00655.6%2,511
1924 41.3% 1,84857.0%2,5541.7% 76
1920 50.9%1,77249.0% 1,7040.1% 5
1916 47.1% 1,41052.5%1,5700.4% 11
1912 23.3% 58851.5%1,29825.1% 633

See also

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For people with the surname, see Honaker (surname).

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Lebanon is a town in Russell County, Virginia, United States. The population was 3,424 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Russell County.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "County Population Totals and Components of Change: 2010-2018" . Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  2. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. Des Cognets, Anna Russell (1884). William Russell and His Descendants. Lexington, Kentucky: Samuel F. Wilson. p.  43 . Retrieved 2011-04-18. col. william russell virginia.
  5. findagrave no. 84882313
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  12. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 11 April 2018.

Coordinates: 36°56′N82°06′W / 36.94°N 82.10°W / 36.94; -82.10