Russell Metty

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Russell Metty, A.S.C.
Metty2.jpg
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Born(1906-09-20)September 20, 1906
DiedApril 28, 1978(1978-04-28) (aged 71)
Occupation Cinematographer

Russell Metty, A.S.C. (September 20, 1906 – April 28, 1978) was an American cinematographer [1] [2] who won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Color, for the 1960 film Spartacus .[ citation needed ]

Contents

Career

Metty's career began around 1925 as an assistant with Standard Film Laboratory, who was then was hired by Paramount Pictures working in the camera department. He left for RKO in 1929. [3] He became a regular cameraman at Universal Studios, and was a regular collaborator with the German film director Douglas Sirk, making eleven films altogether with Sirk.


Filmography

With Ann Blyth on the set of A Woman's Vengeance (1948) Ann Blyth-Russell Metty in A Woman's Vengeance.jpg
With Ann Blyth on the set of A Woman's Vengeance (1948)

Accolades

Director Stanley Kubrick looking through camera with cinematographer Russell Metty (in hat) standing behind, on set for Spartacus (1960). Kubrick-Spartacus-camera.jpg
Director Stanley Kubrick looking through camera with cinematographer Russell Metty (in hat) standing behind, on set for Spartacus (1960).

Wins

Nominations

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References

  1. Bruce Eder (2013). "Russell Metty". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on 2013-10-20.
  2. Goble, Alan. The Complete Index to World Film, since 1885. 2008. Index home page.
  3. 1 2 Steeman, Albert. Internet Encyclopedia of Cinematographers, "Russell Metty page", Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2007. Last accessed: December 19, 2007.