Russian Premier League

Last updated

Russian Premier League
Russian Premier League Logo.png
Organising body Russian Football Union (RFU)
Founded1992 (as Top League)
2001 (as Premier League)
CountryRussia
Confederation UEFA
Number of teams 16
Level on pyramid 1
Relegation to Football National League
Domestic cup(s) Russian Cup
Russian Super Cup
International cup(s) UEFA Champions League
UEFA Europa League
UEFA Europa Conference League
Current champions Zenit Saint Petersburg (7th title)
(2020–21)
Most championships Spartak Moscow (10 titles)
TV partners List of broadcasters
Website premierliga.ru
Current: 2021–22 Russian Premier League

The Russian Premier League (RPL; Russian : Российская премьер-лига; РПЛ) (Russian Premier Liga) is the top division professional association football league in Russia. [1] It was established at the end of 2001 as the Russian Football Premier League (RFPL; Russian : Российская футбольная премьер-лига; РФПЛ) and was rebranded with its current name in 2018. [2] From 1992 through 2001, the top level of the Russian football league system was the Russian Football Championship (Russian : Чемпионат России по футболу, Chempionat Rossii po Futbolu). [3] There are 16 teams in the competition. The league has three Champions League qualifying spots given to the top three teams at the end of the season and the two Europa League spots will be allocated to the fourth and fifth placed teams. The last two teams are relegated to the Russian National Football League at the end of the season.

Contents

The Russian Premier League succeeded the Top Division including history and records. The Top Division was run by the Professional Football League of Russia. Creation of the Premier League is considered to give the clubs a greater degree of independence. The league is currently called Tinkoff Russian Premier League (Russian : Тинькофф Российская Премьер-Лига) (Tinkoff Russian Premier Liga) for sponsorship reasons. [4]

Since the introduction of the Russian Premier League in 2002, Zenit Saint Petersburg (7 times), CSKA Moscow (6 times), Lokomotiv Moscow (3 times), Rubin Kazan (2 times) and Spartak Moscow (1 time) have won the title. Zenit Saint Petersburg are the current Russian Premier League champions.

History

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, starting in 1992, each former Soviet republic organized an independent national championship. In Russia, the six Russian teams who had played in the Soviet Top League in 1991 (CSKA Moscow, Spartak Moscow, Torpedo Moscow, Dynamo Moscow, Spartak Vladikavkaz, and Lokomotiv Moscow) were supplemented with 14 teams from lower divisions to form a 20-team Russian Top Division. The Top Division was further divided into two groups to reduce the total number of matches. The number of teams in the Top Division was gradually reduced to 18 in 1993 and 16 in 1994. Since then, the Russian Top Division (and the Premier League since 2002) has consisted of 16 teams, except for a short-lived experiment with having two more teams in 1996 and 1997.

Spartak Moscow was the dominant force in the top division, winning nine of the first ten titles. Spartak-Alania Vladikavkaz was the only team which managed to break Spartak's dominance, winning the top division title in 1995. Lokomotiv Moscow have won the title three times, and CSKA Moscow six times.

In 2007, Zenit St. Petersburg climbed to the top, winning the title for the first time in their history in Russian professional football; they had also won a Soviet title in 1984. 2008 brought the rise of Rubin Kazan, a club entirely new to the Russian top flight, as it had never competed in the Soviet Top League.

In preparation for the 2018–19 season, it was decided to hold a rebranding in which a new logo was presented. [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]

Competition

Russian Premier League match between Zenit and Dynamo (the last Zenit match at the Kirov Stadium, stadium had been already partially demolished.) Kirov stadium.jpg
Russian Premier League match between Zenit and Dynamo (the last Zenit match at the Kirov Stadium, stadium had been already partially demolished.)

Teams in the Russian Premier League play each other twice, once at home and once away, for a total of 30 matches. Three points are awarded for a win, one for a draw, and none for a loss. If teams are level on points, the tie-breakers are the number of wins, then the goal difference, followed by several other factors. If the teams are tied for the first position, the tie-breakers are the number of wins, then head-to-head results. If the teams tied for the first place cannot be separated by these tie-breakers, a championship play-off is ordered.

Russian Premier League match between Lokomotiv and Spartak at the Lokomotiv Stadium Lokomotiv Stadium 1.jpg
Russian Premier League match between Lokomotiv and Spartak at the Lokomotiv Stadium

As of 2020–21 season, the champions qualify for the UEFA Champions League group stage. The runners-up qualifies for the Champions League third qualifying round. The third and fourth-place teams qualify for the UEFA Europa Conference League. If the winner of Russian Cup ends in first or second on the championship in same season, then the third-place team qualifies to UEFA Europa League group stage, while fourth and fifth-place teams qualify for the UEFA Europa Conference League instead. The bottom two teams are relegated to the National League. Starting on the 2020–21 season the teams ranked in 13th and 14th-place play a two legs relegation play-off against 4th and 3rd-place team from National League. The two winners of this play-off secures the right to play in Premier League in following season.

Unlike most other European football leagues, the league traditionally used to ran in summer, from March to November, to avoid playing games in the cold and snowy weather in winter. This was altered ahead of the 2012–13 season, with the league planning to run the season from autumn to spring. The transitional season of the competition began in early 2011 and continued until summer of 2012. After the 16 Premier League teams played each other twice over the course of the 2011 calendar year, they were split into two groups of eight, and the teams played other teams in their groups two more times for a total of 44 games (30 in 2011 and 14 in 2012). Those two groups were contested in spring 2012, with the top eight clubs playing for the title and European places. The other sides vied to avoid relegation: the bottom two went down while the next two played off against the sides third and fourth in the National Football League, with the two losers being relegated (or denied promotion). [10] Under the current autumn-spring calendar, the league takes a three-month winter break from mid-December until mid-March. Merging the calendar with other UEFA leagues however, has increased numbers of games in winter. This has resulted in the Russian Far East and Siberian teams being forced to play more home games in hostile weather conditions which affected the Premier League when SKA Khabarovsk took part. [11]

Youth championship

The Youth championship (Russian : Молодежное первенство), also known as Youth teams championship (Russian : Первенство молодёжных команд), Reserve team tournament (Russian : Турнир дублирующих составов) or Reserves tournament (Russian : Турнир дублёров), full name Youth football championship of Russia among teams of clubs of the Premier League (Russian : Молодёжное Первенство России по футболу среди команд клубов Премьер-Лиги), is a league that runs in parallel to the Russian Premier League and includes the youth or reserve teams of the Russian Premier League teams. The number of players a team can have on the pitch at a time that are over 21 years of age or without a Russian citizenship is limited. 16 teams participate in the league. Matches are commonly played a day before the match of the senior teams of the respective teams. All of the Russian Premier League teams are obliged to have a youth team that would participate in the Youth championship. The teams that are promoted from the National Football League and do not have a youth team must create one. The teams in the league are not relegated based on their final league position, but on the league position of their respective clubs' senior teams.

It has to be noted however that some Premier League clubs have three teams. Apart from the senior team and the team that plays in the Youth championship a team might have another senior team that plays in a lower division of Russian football and serves as the farm team for the main team. Some examples include Spartak-2 and Zenit-2, playing in the Russian Football National League.

Reserves tournament champions (2001–2007)

Youth championship winners (since 2008)

UEFA club rankings

Russia are currently seventh in the UEFA coefficient rankings. The following are the best ranked Russian teams in Europe as of December 2020: [12]

No.TeamPoints
27 Zenit Saint Petersburg 50.000
35 CSKA Moscow 40.000
44 Krasnodar 34.500
51 Lokomotiv Moscow 31.000
79 Spartak Moscow 18.500
106 Rostov 14.000
146 Dynamo Moscow 1.500
147 Ufa 1.500
148 Rubin Kazan 2.500

Current clubs

European Russia laea location map (Crimea disputed).svg
Red pog.svg
Ufa
Locations of teams in 2019–20 Russian Premier League

The following teams are competing in the 2020–21 season:

TeamHome cityStadiumCapacity
Akhmat Grozny Grozny Akhmat-Arena 30,597
Arsenal Tula Tula Arsenal Stadium 20,048
CSKA Moscow Moscow VEB Arena 30,457 [13]
Dynamo Moscow Moscow VTB Arena 26,700
Khimki Khimki, Moscow Region Arena Khimki 18,636
Krasnodar Krasnodar Krasnodar Stadium 34,291
Lokomotiv Moscow Moscow Lokomotiv Stadium 27,320
Rostov Rostov-on-Don Rostov Arena 45,000
Rotor Volgograd Volgograd Volgograd Arena 45,568
Rubin Kazan Kazan Kazan Arena 45,093 [14]
Sochi Sochi Fisht Olympic Stadium 44,287
Spartak Moscow Moscow Otkrytiye Arena 44,307 [15]
Tambov Tambov Spartak Stadium 8,000
Ufa Ufa Neftyanik Stadium 15,132 [16]
FC Ural Yekaterinburg Yekaterinburg Central Stadium 35,696
Zenit Saint Petersburg Saint Petersburg Krestovsky Stadium 67,800 [17]

Champions and top scorers

SeasonChampionsRunners-upThird placeTop scorer
1992 Spartak Moscow Spartak Vladikavkaz Dynamo Moscow Flag of Azerbaijan.svg Vali Gasimov (Dinamo Moscow, 16 goals – 1–8 place)
Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg Yuri Matveyev (Uralmash Yekaterinburg, 20 goals – 9–20 place)
1993 Spartak Moscow (2) Rotor Volgograd Dynamo Moscow (2) Flag of Russia (1991-1993).svg Victor Panchenko (KamAZ Naberezhnye Chelny, 21 goals)
1994 Spartak Moscow (3) Dynamo Moscow Lokomotiv Moscow Flag of Russia.svg Igor Simutenkov (Dinamo Moscow, 21 goals)
1995 Spartak-Alania Vladikavkaz Lokomotiv Moscow Spartak Moscow Flag of Russia.svg Oleg Veretennikov (Rotor Volgograd, 25 goals)
1996 Spartak Moscow (4) Alania Vladikavkaz (2) Rotor Volgograd Flag of Russia.svg Aleksandr Maslov (Rostselmash, 23 goals)
1997 Spartak Moscow (5) Rotor Volgograd (2) Dynamo Moscow (3) Flag of Russia.svg Oleg Veretennikov (Rotor Volgograd, 22 goals)
1998 Spartak Moscow (6) CSKA Moscow Lokomotiv Moscow (2) Flag of Russia.svg Oleg Veretennikov (Rotor Volgograd, 22 goals)
1999 Spartak Moscow (7) Lokomotiv Moscow (2) CSKA Moscow Flag of Georgia (1990-2004).svg Georgi Demetradze (Alania Vladikavkaz, 21 goals)
2000 Spartak Moscow (8) Lokomotiv Moscow (3) Torpedo Moscow Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Loskov (Lokomotiv Moscow, 18 goals)
2001 Spartak Moscow (9) Lokomotiv Moscow (4) Zenit Saint Petersburg Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Vyazmikin (Torpedo Moscow, 18 goals)
2002 Lokomotiv Moscow CSKA Moscow (2) Spartak Moscow (2) Flag of Russia.svg Rolan Gusev (CSKA Moscow, 15 goals)
Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Kirichenko (CSKA Moscow, 15 goals)
2003 CSKA Moscow Zenit Saint Petersburg Rubin Kazan Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Loskov (Lokomotiv Moscow, 14 goals)
2004 Lokomotiv Moscow (2) CSKA Moscow (2) Krylia Sovetov Samara Flag of Russia.svg Aleksandr Kerzhakov (Zenit St. Petersburg, 18 goals)
2005 CSKA Moscow (2) Spartak Moscow Lokomotiv Moscow (3) Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Kirichenko (Moscow, 14 goals)
2006 CSKA Moscow (3) Spartak Moscow (2) Lokomotiv Moscow (4) Flag of Russia.svg Roman Pavlyuchenko (Spartak Moscow, 18 goals)
2007 Zenit Saint Petersburg Spartak Moscow (3) CSKA Moscow (2) Flag of Russia.svg Roman Pavlyuchenko (Spartak Moscow, 14 goals)
Flag of Russia.svg Roman Adamov (Moscow, 14 goals)
2008 Rubin Kazan CSKA Moscow (4) Dynamo Moscow (4) Flag of Brazil.svg Vágner Love (CSKA Moscow, 20 goals)
2009 Rubin Kazan (2) Spartak Moscow (4) Zenit Saint Petersburg (2) Flag of Brazil.svg Welliton (Spartak Moscow, 21 goals)
2010 Zenit Saint Petersburg (2) CSKA Moscow (5) Rubin Kazan (2) Flag of Brazil.svg Welliton (Spartak Moscow, 19 goals)
2011–12 Zenit Saint Petersburg (3) Spartak Moscow (5) CSKA Moscow (3) Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Seydou Doumbia (CSKA Moscow, 28 goals)
2012–13 CSKA Moscow (4) Zenit Saint Petersburg (2) Anzhi Makhachkala Flag of Armenia.svg Yura Movsisyan (Krasnodar/Spartak Moscow, 13 goals)
Flag of Brazil.svg Wánderson (Krasnodar, 13 goals)
2013–14 CSKA Moscow (5) Zenit Saint Petersburg (3) Lokomotiv Moscow (5) Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Seydou Doumbia (CSKA Moscow, 18 goals)
2014–15 Zenit Saint Petersburg (4) CSKA Moscow (6) Krasnodar Flag of Brazil.svg Hulk (Zenit Saint Petersburg, 15 goals)
2015–16 CSKA Moscow (6) Rostov Zenit Saint Petersburg (3) Flag of Russia.svg Fyodor Smolov (Krasnodar, 20 goals)
2016–17 Spartak Moscow (10) CSKA Moscow (7) Zenit Saint Petersburg (4) Flag of Russia.svg Fyodor Smolov (Krasnodar, 18 goals)
2017–18 Lokomotiv Moscow (3) CSKA Moscow (8) Spartak Moscow (3) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Quincy Promes (Spartak Moscow, 15 goals)
2018–19 Zenit Saint Petersburg (5) Lokomotiv Moscow (5) Krasnodar (2) Flag of Russia.svg Fyodor Chalov (CSKA Moscow, 15 goals)
2019–20 Zenit Saint Petersburg (6) Lokomotiv Moscow (6) Krasnodar (3) Flag of Iran.svg Sardar Azmoun (Zenit Saint Petersburg, 17 goals)
Flag of Russia.svg Artem Dzyuba (Zenit Saint Petersburg, 17 goals)
2020–21 Zenit Saint Petersburg (7) Spartak Moscow (6) Lokomotiv Moscow (6) Flag of Russia.svg Artem Dzyuba (Zenit Saint Petersburg, 20 goals)

Performance by club

ClubWinnersRunners-upThird placeSeasons won
Spartak Moscow
10
6
3
1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2016–17
Zenit Saint Petersburg
7
3
4
2007, 2010, 2011–12, 2014–15, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2020–21
CSKA Moscow
6
8
3
2003, 2005, 2006, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2015–16
Lokomotiv Moscow
3
6
6
2002, 2004, 2017–18
Rubin Kazan
2
0
2
2008, 2009
Alania Vladikavkaz
1
2
0
1995
Rotor Volgograd
0
2
1
Dynamo Moscow
0
1
4
Rostov
0
1
0
Krasnodar
0
0
3
Torpedo Moscow
0
0
1
Krylia Sovetov Samara
0
0
1
Anzhi Makhachkala
0
0
1
Total292828

UEFA ranking

UEFA League Ranking at the end of the 2018–19 season:

  1. Flag of Spain.svg Spanish La Liga
  2. Flag of England.svg English Premier League
  3. Flag of Italy.svg Italian Serie A
  4. Flag of Germany.svg German Bundesliga
  5. Flag of France.svg French Ligue 1
  6. Flag of Russia.svg Russian Premier League
  7. Flag of Portugal.svg Portuguese Primeira Liga
  8. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgian Pro League
  9. Flag of Ukraine.svg Ukrainian Premier League
  10. Flag of Turkey.svg Süper Lig

Seasons of Russian Premier League and Russian Football Championship (1992-2022)

A total of 51 teams had competed in at least one season at the top division. Spartak Moscow, CSKA Moscow and Lokomotiv Moscow are the only teams to have played in the top division in every season since the league's inception at 1992. The teams in bold participate in the 2021–22 Premier League.

SeasonsClubs
30 Spartak Moscow , CSKA Moscow , Lokomotiv Moscow
29 Dynamo Moscow
28 Rostov
27 Zenit Saint Petersburg , Krylia Sovetov Samara
19 Rubin Kazan
16 Alania Vladikavkaz, Torpedo Moscow
15 Akhmat Grozny
14 Rotor Volgograd, Amkar Perm, Ural Yekaterinburg
12 Saturn Ramenskoye
11 Anzhi Makhachkala, Krasnodar
10 Shinnik Yaroslavl
9 Moscow, Tom Tomsk, Kuban Krasnodar
8 Lokomotiv Nizhny Novgorod, Chernomorets Novorossiysk, Ufa
7 Zhemchuzhina-Sochi, Arsenal Tula
6 Spartak Nalchik
5 Tekstilshchik Kamyshin, KAMAZ Naberezhnye Chelny , Elista, Tyumen, Khimki
4 Luch Vladivostok, Fakel Voronezh
3 Torpedo-ZIL Moscow, Baltika Kaliningrad, Dynamo Stavropol, Volga Nizhny Novgorod, Mordovia Saransk, Orenburg, Sochi
2 Okean Nakhodka, Asmaral Moscow, Sokol Saratov, Lada-Tolyatti, Tambov
1 Sibir Novosibirsk, Tosno, SKA-Khabarovsk, Yenisey Krasnoyarsk, Nizhny Novgorod

All-time table

As of the end of the 2017–18 season. Teams in bold compete in 2018–19 Premier League.
RankClub1SeasonsSpellsMost
recent
season
Played2WonDrawnLostGoalsPoints3GoldSilverBronzeNotes
1 Spartak Moscow 3018934702041891551-91716701054
2 CSKA Moscow 3018934492022121288-8161607683
3 Lokomotiv Moscow 3018934242401991262-8101572366
4 Zenit Saint Petersburg 2728023952101671448-7831247734
5 Dynamo Moscow 2928623392402531152-9561297-14
6 Krylya Sovetov Samara 274806249218339851–1057965--1
7 Rostov 283832242230330865–1067993-1-
8 Rubin Kazan 191554215153156654–5258362-2
9 Torpedo Moscow 1622014–15492188142162625–598706--1
10 Alania Vladikavkaz 1632012–13489179109201630–66364612-Disbanded and reestablished 2014
11 Rotor Volgograd 1422020-21432156116160577–558584-21
12 Amkar Perm 1412017–18434114131159368–478508---Disbanded 2018
13 Saturn Moscow Oblast 1212010360120121119396–378481---
14 Akhmat Grozny 12234410277135322–404422 4---
15 Ural Sverdlovsk Oblast 1123089358127337–421374---
16 Krasnodar 81224885452295–213372--1
17 Anzhi Makhachkala 1133148683115299–353365--1
18 Moscow 912009270928395295–311359---Disbanded 2010
19 Shinnik Yaroslavl 10420083048586133294–403341---
21 Tom Tomsk 922016–172847577132259–395302---
22 Chernomorets Novorossiysk 8220032487465109274–357287---
24 Zhemchuzhina Sochi 7119992226157104263–390240---Disbanded 2003 and 2013, reestablished 2007
25 Spartak Nalchik 612011–12194545783207–239219---
26 Energia-Tekstilshchik Kamyshin 511996158534362172–177202---
27 KAMAZ Naberezhnye Chelny 511997162513279198–253179 5---
28 Uralan Elista 522003150363975138–225147---Disbanded 2005, reestablished 2014
29 Ufa 419025263973–108144---
30 Luch-Energia Vladivostok 422008124343258116–187134---
31 Baltika Kaliningrad 31199898303731114–111127---
32 Fakel Voronezh 432001124312964101–175122---
33 Dynamo Stavropol 3119949427234494–125104---Disbanded 2014, re-established 2015
34 Tyumen 5319981542526103116–326101---
35 Arsenal Tula 326014113538–8695---
36 Volga Nizhny Novgorod 312013–1410425166387–17191---Disbanded 2016
37 Mordovia Saransk 322015–169020224882–15082---
38 Okean Nakhodka 2119936422142865–8380---Disbanded 2015, reestablished 2018
39 Khimki 3120099017235086–15174---
40 Asmaral Moscow 2119936019113074–10268---Disbanded 1999
41 Sokol Saratov 2120026017133055–8764---
42 Lada Togliatti 2219966410163842–10546---
43 Orenburg 2230791425–3630---
44 Tosno 112017–1830661823–5424---Disbanded 2018
46 SKA-Khabarovsk 112017–1830272116–5513---
47 Yenisey Krasnoyarsk 112018-1930481824-5520---
Competing in RPL
Competing in FNL (2nd tier)
Competing in PFL (3rd tier)
Competing in amateur leagues (below 3rd tier)
Defunct (see notes)
Notes
  1. For clubs that have been renamed, their name at the time of their most recent season in the Russian League is given. The current members are listed in bold.
  2. Includes championship play-offs, does not include relegation play-offs.
  3. For the purposes of this table, each win is worth 3 points. The three-point system was adopted in 1995.
  4. Terek were deducted 6 points in 2005.
  5. KAMAZ-Chally were deducted 6 points in 1997.

Player records

Most appearances

As of 31 July 2021
RankPlayerApps
1 Flag of Russia.svg Sergei Ignashevich 489
2 Flag of Russia.svg Igor Akinfeev 487
3 Flag of Russia.svg Sergei Semak 456
4 Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Loskov 453
5 Flag of Russia.svg Igor Semshov 433
6 Flag of Russia.svg Vasili Berezutski 402
7 Flag of Russia.svg Ruslan Adzhindzhal 397
8 Flag of Russia.svg Valery Yesipov 390
9 Flag of Russia.svg Aleksandr Samedov 386
10 Flag of Russia.svg Igor Denisov 384

Most goals

As of 1 August 2021
RankPlayerGoalsAppsAvg/Game
1 Flag of Russia.svg Oleg Veretennikov 1432740.52
2 Flag of Russia.svg Aleksandr Kerzhakov 1393390.41
3 Flag of Russia.svg Artem Dzyuba 1383640.38
4 Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Kirichenko 1293770.34
5 Flag of Russia.svg Dmitri Loskov 1204530.26
6 Flag of Russia.svg Roman Pavlyuchenko 1043090.34
7 Flag of Russia.svg Sergei Semak 1024560.22
8 Flag of Russia.svg Andrey Tikhonov 983460.28
8 Flag of Russia.svg Igor Semshov 984330.23
10 Flag of Russia.svg Valery Yesipov 883900.23

Champions (players)

Media coverage

2020–21 and 2021–22

Russia and CIS

ChannelSummaryRef
Match TV 60 matches per season live [18]
Match Premier All 240 matches live

the Super Cup matches for viewers in Russia are excluded.

Worldwide (excluding Russia, CIS, and China)

All 240 matches are aired live globally on YouTube with a required subscription. There will be two membership levels for the viewers outside Russia, CIS, and China. The first level includes two matches with English commentary each matchday and will cost a monthly fee of $2.99. The second level, for $4.99 a month, gives subscribers access to all eight matches in Russian and two matches with English commentary as well. [19] In 2018–19 season, YouTube broadcast four live matches per week for free (in matchweek 30, aired all last eight matches). [20] From 2020–21, YouTube also broadcast the FTA coverage of Super Cup before airing the league.

Country/RegionBroadcaster
Sport Klub
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Grupo Bandeirantes
Qsport
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China Tencent QQ
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus CytaVision [21]
Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong i-Cable
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain LaLigaSportsTV [22]

See also

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References

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  2. "RFPL". rfpl.org. Archived from the original on 29 November 2014.
  3. "ABOUT RUSSIAN FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP". rfpl.org. Archived from the original on 7 June 2017.
  4. "Tinkoff named title partner of the Russian Premier Liga". Russian Premier Liga. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
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