Sándor Kocsis

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Sándor Kocsis
Sandor Kocsis 1960 cropped.jpg
Kocsis in 1960
Personal information
Full nameSándor Kocsis Péter
Date of birth(1929-09-21)21 September 1929
Place of birth Budapest, Hungary
Date of death 22 July 1979(1979-07-22) (aged 49)
Place of death Barcelona, Spain
Playing position Striker
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1945–1946 Köbanyai TC 5 (0)
1946–1950 Ferencváros 59 (40)
1950 ÉDOSZ 30 (30)
1950–1957 Honvéd 145 (153)
1957–1958 Young Fellows Zürich 11 (7)
1958–1965 Barcelona 184 (111)
1961Valencia (guest)
National team
1948–1956 Hungary 68 (75)
Teams managed
1970–1971 Hércules
?? Alicante
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Sándor Péter Kocsis (Hungarian pronunciation:  [ˈʃaːndor ˈpeːtɛr ˈkot͡ʃiʃ] ; 21 September 1929 – 22 July 1979) was a Hungarian footballer who played for Ferencváros TC, Budapest Honvéd, Young Fellows Zürich, FC Barcelona and Hungary as a striker. During the 1950s, along with Ferenc Puskás, Zoltán Czibor, József Bozsik and Nándor Hidegkuti, he was a member of the Mighty Magyars. After the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, he moved to Spain where he became a member of the FC Barcelona team of the late 1950s.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Budapest Honvéd FC sports club in Hungary

Budapest Honvéd FC (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈbudɒpɛʃt ˈhonveːd ˈɛft͡seː] is a Hungarian sports club based in Kispest, Budapest with colours red-black. The club is best known for its football team. Honved means the Homeland Defence. Originally formed as Kispest AC, they became Kispest FC in 1926 before reverting to their original name in 1944. The team enjoyed a golden age during the 1950s when it was renamed Budapesti Honvéd SE and became the Hungarian Army team. The club's top players from this era, Ferenc Puskás, Sándor Kocsis, József Bozsik, Zoltán Czibor, and Gyula Grosics formed the nucleus of the legendary Hungarian team known as the Mighty Magyars and helped the club win the Hungarian League four times during the 1950s. During the 1980s and early 1990s the club enjoyed another successful period, winning a further eight Hungarian League titles. They also won league and cup doubles in 1985 and 1989. In 1991 the club was renamed Kispest Honvéd FC and adopted its current name in 2003.

Sportclub Young Fellows Juventus is a professional Swiss football club based in Zürich. It was founded in 1992 following a merger between Young Fellows Zürich and Società Calcistica Italiana Juventus Zurigo (1922).

Contents

Kocsis was a prolific goalscorer for both Budapest Honvéd and Hungary. While playing for Honvéd, he was the top goal scorer in any European league in both 1952 and 1954. He also scored 75 goals in 68 appearances for Hungary – a 1.10 goal/game average at the game's highest level. Kocsis was the top goal scorer in the 1954 World Cup with 11 goals, being the first player to score two hat tricks in a World Cup. His 2.2 goal/game average in the World Cup finals is second only to that of Ernst Wilimowski who scored four goals in his only World Cup match, [1] and only Just Fontaine has scored more goals than Kocsis in a single World Cup. Kocsis was particularly known for scoring headers.

The Hungary national football team represents Hungary in international football and is controlled by the Hungarian Football Federation.

1954 FIFA World Cup 1954 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1954 FIFA World Cup, the fifth staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in Switzerland from 16 June to 4 July. Switzerland was chosen as hosts in July 1946. The tournament set a number of all-time records for goal-scoring, including the highest average number of goals scored per game. The tournament was won by West Germany, who defeated Hungary 3–2 in the final, giving them their first title.

Ernst Wilimowski Polish footballer

Ernest Willimowski was a German–Polish football player, who played as a forward. He ranks among the best goalscorers in the history of both the Poland national team and Polish club football. After re-taking German citizenship, he also played for the Germany national team.

His 1.103 goals/game average is ranked No.1 for players past 43 caps in FIFA class-A competition, closely followed by Gerd Müller with 1.097 goals/game (68 scores in 62 games), and are the only two players in history above a +1.0 goals/game average encompassing more than 43 internationals. Ferenc Puskás with .99 goals/game (84 goals in 85 matches) is currently ranked 3rd.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is an organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and eFootball. FIFA is responsible for the organization of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

Gerd Müller German association football player

Gerhard "Gerd" Müller is a German retired footballer. A prolific striker renowned for his clinical finishing, especially in and around the six-yard box, he is regarded as one of the greatest players and goalscorers of all time.

Sándor Kocsis registered seven hat tricks for Hungary. [2]

Career

Early years

Kocsis was born in Budapest. He began his career as a junior with Kőbányai TC before joining Ferencváros TC where he won his first Hungarian League title in 1949. He was then conscripted into the army and joined the army club, Honvéd. His team mates at Honvéd included Ferenc Puskás, Zoltán Czibor and József Bozsik. During his time at the club he won three more Hungarian League titles in 1952, 1954 and 1955. He finished as top goalscorer in the league on three occasions in 1951, 1952 and 1954 scoring 30, 36 and 33 goals respectively. On the latter two occasions he was also the top goalscorer in any European league.

Ferenc Puskás Hungarian-Spanish association football player

Ferenc Puskás was a Hungarian footballer and manager, widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time and he is the son of former footballer Ferenc Puskás Senior. A prolific forward, he scored 84 goals in 85 international matches for Hungary, and 514 goals in 529 matches in the Hungarian and Spanish leagues. He became an Olympic champion in 1952 and led his nation to the final of the 1954 World Cup where he was named the tournament's best player. He won three European Cups, 10 national championships and 8 top individual scoring honors. In 1995, he was recognized as the top scorer of the 20th century by the IFFHS.

Zoltán Czibor Hungarian footballer

Zoltán Czibor was a Hungarian footballer who played for several Hungarian clubs, including Ferencváros TC and Honvéd, and Hungary before joining CF Barcelona. Czibor played as a left-winger or striker and was notable for having a powerful shot, good pace and excellent ball control. During the 1950s he was part of the Magical Magyars. After the 1956 Hungarian Revolution he moved to Spain where he became a prominent member of the successful FC Barcelona team of the late 1950s. After three seasons at Barcelona, he joined their local rivals Español for the 1961/62 season. After brief spells at FC Basel, FK Austria Wien and Primo Hamilton FC, he retired as a professional footballer and returned to Hungary. He died there in 1997, aged 68.

József Bozsik Hungarian footballer

József Bozsik was a Hungarian footballer who played as a midfielder. He spent his entire club career at his hometown club, Budapest Honvéd. Bozsik was a key member of the legendary Mighty Magyars as he represented Hungary in various international tournaments.

During the 1952 season at Honvéd, Kocsis was the world's top goalscorer in world 1st division football with 36 goals. He repeated that feat in 1954 with 33 goals.

Kocsis made his debut for the senior Hungary team in 1948. Together with Ferenc Puskás, Zoltán Czibor, József Bozsik and Nándor Hidegkuti, he formed the offensive nucleus of the Golden Team that went unbeaten for 32 consecutive games. The Hungarian national team suffered no defeats in Class-A international matches between 4 June 1950 and 4 July 1954, in the 1954 FIFA World Cup Final.

Nándor Hidegkuti Hungarian footballer

Nándor Hidegkuti was a Hungarian football player and manager. He played as a forward or attacking midfielder and spent the majority of his playing career at MTK Hungária FC. During the 1950s he was also a key member of the Hungarian National Team team known as the Golden Team. Other members of the team included Ferenc Puskás, Zoltán Czibor, Sándor Kocsis and József Bozsik. In 1953, playing as a deep lying centre-forward, he scored a hat-trick for Hungary when they beat England 6–3 at Wembley Stadium. Playing from deep, Hidegkuti was able to distribute the ball to the other attackers and cause considerable confusion to defenses. This was an innovation at the time and revolutionised the way the game was played.

1954 FIFA World Cup Final association football match

The 1954 FIFA World Cup Final was the final match of the 1954 FIFA World Cup, the fifth World Cup in FIFA history. The game was played at the Wankdorf Stadium in Bern, Switzerland, on 4 July 1954, and saw West Germany beat the heavily favoured Golden Team of Hungary 3–2.

Kocsis scored his first international hat trick in a game against Sweden on 20 November 1949, and he scored a further one on 22 June 1952 against Finland. Kocsis also scored six goals at the Olympics in Helsinki as Hungary became Olympic Champions in 1952. On 19 October 1952, he scored his third international hat trick in a game against Czechoslovakia.

In 1953, Hungary defeated England 6–3 at Wembley Stadium and then in 1954 by 7–1 in Budapest. During the latter game, Kocsis added a further two goals. In 1953 Hungary also won the Central European International Cup.

1954 World Cup

He finished the 1954 World Cup as top goalscorer, scoring 11 goals including two hat tricks. In the opening game he scored his first hat trick of the tournament against South Korea as Hungary cruised to a 9–0 win. In the next game against Germany, he went one further and scored four of the goals in an 8–3 win against the understrength team of coach Sepp Herberger. In the quarter-finals Hungary played Brazil in a game referred to as the Battle of Berne : Kocsis scored twice in an encounter which saw Hungary win 4–2. Hungary then reached the final after they defeated reigning World champions Uruguay in the semi-finals. The game was 2–2 in extra time until Kocsis scored twice to seal another 4–2 win. In the final they met Germany once again. However, for the first time in the competition Kocsis failed to score and the Germans won 3–2.

On 24 October 1954, he scored his sixth international hat trick and second against Czechoslovakia. He completed his seventh and last hat trick for Hungary on 5 November 1955 in a game against the same opponents, Sweden, that he had scored his first.

Honvéd World Tour

In 1956 Honvéd entered the European Cup and in the first round they were drawn against Athletic Bilbao. Honvéd lost the away leg 2–3, but before the home leg could be played, the Hungarian Revolution had erupted back in Budapest. The players decided against going back to Hungary and arranged for the return with Athletic to be played at the Heysel Stadium in Brussels. Despite drawing 3–3 they went out on 6–5 on aggregate.

Elimination left Honvéd in limbo. The players summoned their families from Budapest and, despite opposition from FIFA and the Hungarian football authorities, they organised a fundraising tour of Italy, Portugal, Spain and Brazil. After returning to Europe, the players parted ways. Some, including Bozsik, returned to Hungary while others, including Czibor, Kocsis and Puskás, found new clubs in Western Europe.

FC Barcelona and coaching career

Kocsis spent one season with Young Fellows Zürich before another Hungarian refugee, László Kubala, persuaded him and Zoltán Czibor to join him at FC Barcelona where he became a vital member of the team. He subsequently scored on his La Liga debut in a 4–1 win over Real Betis and as part of a team that also included Ramallets, Evaristo and Luis Suárez, Kocsis won a Copa del Generalísimo/La Liga double in 1959 and a La Liga/Fairs Cup double in 1960. FC Barcelona also reached the final of the European Cup in 1961 and this saw Czibor and Kocsis return to the Wankdorf Stadium in Bern, where in 1954, while playing for Hungary, they had lost the World Cup Final. Despite both of them scoring, they finished on the losing side once again. They also lost by the same 3–2 score again, this time to S.L. Benfica.

He scored twice in the 1959 Copa del Generalísimo final as FC Barcelona defeated Granada CF 4–1. In the 1960 European Cup he scored four of the goals in a 5–2 quarter-final win over Wolves. He also scored a hat trick against Real Sociedad in a La Liga game in 1961 and scored all three goals in the 1962 Fairs Cup final that they lost to Valencia CF 7–3 on aggregate. In 1961, he also played as a guest for Valencia CF and helped them win their own summer trophy, the Trofeo Naranja. He scored in both games as Valencia beat Botafogo and FC Barcelona. Kocsis also scored in the 1963 Copa del Generalísimo final held at the Camp Nou. FC Barcelona beat Real Zaragoza 3–1.

Later life and death

Kocsis retired as a player in 1966 and opened a restaurant in Barcelona called Tete D’ Or. He also worked as a coach with FC Barcelona and managed Hércules CF between 1972 and 1974. However his coaching career was cut short when he was diagnosed with leukemia and then stomach cancer. On 22 July 1979, aged 49, he fell to his death from the fourth floor of a hospital in Barcelona. It has been alleged that he committed suicide, though it may have been only an accident. [3] [4]

Career statistics

Club

Source:

Club performanceLeagueCupLeague CupContinentalTotal
SeasonClubLeagueAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
HungaryLeague Hungarian Cup League Cup Europe Total
1946–47 Ferencvárosi Hungarian National Championship I 32------32
1947–48 215------215
1948–49 3033------3033
1949–50 3030------3030
1950 Budapest Honvéd Hungarian National Championship I 15241524
1951 263013----2733
1952 2636313----2949
1953 2524------2524
1954 2633513----3146
1955 211713--462626
1956 2113----222315
SwitzerlandLeague Schweizer Cup League Cup Europe Total
1957–58 Young Fellows Juventus Super League 117------117
SpainLeague Copa del Rey Supercopa de España Europe Total
1958–59 Barcelona La Liga 44611001015
1959–60 930045138
1960–61 10411962011
1961–62 201720632820
1962–63 927334199
1963–64 191264432919
1964–65 40003070
TotalHungary2492471032--68265287
Switzerland117117
Spain75422219002921235151
Career total3352963251--3529511444

International

Sources: [5] [6]

Hungary national team
YearAppsGoals
194812
194965
195065
195136
19521216
195351
19541423
19551210
195697
Total6875

International goals

Scores and results list Hungary's goal tally first.
#DateVenueOpponentScoreCompetition
16 June 1948 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Romania (1948-1952).svg Romania 9–0 1948 Balkan Cup
26 June 1948 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Romania (1948-1952).svg Romania 9–0 1948 Balkan Cup
32 May 1949 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Austria.svg Austria 6–1 1948–53 Dr. Gerö Cup
419 June 1949 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 2–2 Friendly
520 November 1949 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 5–0 Friendly
620 November 1949 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 5–0 Friendly
720 November 1949 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 5–0 Friendly
830 April 1950 Hungária, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly
930 April 1950 Hungária, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly
1015 May 1950 Praterstadion, Vienna Flag of Austria.svg Austria 3–5 Friendly
1124 September 1950 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Albania (1946-1992).svg Albania 12–0 Friendly
1224 September 1950 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Albania (1946-1992).svg Albania 12–0 Friendly
1327 May 1951 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Poland.svg Poland 6–0 Friendly
1427 May 1951 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Poland.svg Poland 6–0 Friendly
1514 October 1951 Městský stadion, Ostrava Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 2–1 Friendly
1614 October 1951 Městský stadion, Ostrava Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 2–1 Friendly
1718 November 1951 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Finland.svg Finland 8–0 Friendly
1818 November 1951 Hungária, Budapest Flag of Finland.svg Finland 8–0 Friendly
1918 May 1952 Hungária, Budapest Flag of East Germany.svg East Germany 5–0 Friendly
2015 June 1952 Stadion Wojska Polskiego, Warsaw Flag of Poland.svg Poland 5–1 Friendly
2115 June 1952 Stadion Wojska Polskiego, Warsaw Flag of Poland.svg Poland 5–1 Friendly
2222 June 1952 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland 6–1 Friendly
2322 June 1952 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland 6–1 Friendly
2422 June 1952 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg Finland 6–1 Friendly
2515 July 1952 Kupittaa, Turku Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg Romania 2–1 1952 Summer Olympics
2621 July 1952 Pallokenttä, Helsinki Flag of Italy.svg Italy 3–0 1952 Summer Olympics
2724 July 1952 Urheilukeskus, Kotka Flag of Turkey.svg Turkey 7–1 1952 Summer Olympics
2824 July 1952 Urheilukeskus, Kotka Flag of Turkey.svg Turkey 7–1 1952 Summer Olympics
2928 July 1952 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 6–0 1952 Summer Olympics
3028 July 1952 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 6–0 1952 Summer Olympics
3120 September 1952 Wankdorf Stadium, Bern Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 4–2 1948–53 Dr. Gerö Cup
3219 October 1952 Hungária, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly
3319 October 1952 Hungária, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly
3419 October 1952 Hungária, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly
355 July 1953 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 4–2 Friendly
3623 May 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of England.svg England 7–1 Hungary v England (1954)
3723 May 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of England.svg England 7–1 Hungary v England (1954)
3817 June 1954 Hardturm Stadium, Zürich Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 9–0 1954 FIFA World Cup
3917 June 1954 Hardturm Stadium, Zürich Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 9–0 1954 FIFA World Cup
4017 June 1954 Hardturm Stadium, Zürich Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 9–0 1954 FIFA World Cup
4120 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basel Flag of Germany.svg West Germany 8–3 1954 FIFA World Cup
4220 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basel Flag of Germany.svg West Germany 8–3 1954 FIFA World Cup
4320 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basel Flag of Germany.svg West Germany 8–3 1954 FIFA World Cup
4420 June 1954 St. Jakob Stadium, Basel Flag of Germany.svg West Germany 8–3 1954 FIFA World Cup
4527 June 1954 Wankdorf Stadium, Bern Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg Brazil 4–2 1954 FIFA World Cup Quarterfinal
4627 June 1954 Wankdorf Stadium, Bern Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg Brazil 4–2 1954 FIFA World Cup Quarterfinal
4730 June 1954 Stade Olympique de la Pontaise, Lausanne Flag of Uruguay.svg Uruguay 4–2 1954 FIFA World Cup Semi Final
4830 June 1954 Stade Olympique de la Pontaise, Lausanne Flag of Uruguay.svg Uruguay 4–2 1954 FIFA World Cup Semi Final
4919 September 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg Romania 5–1 Friendly
5019 September 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Romania (1952-1965).svg Romania 5–1 Friendly
5126 September 1954 Dynamo Stadium, Moscow Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg Soviet Union 1–1 Friendly
5210 October 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 3–0 Friendly
5310 October 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 3–0 Friendly
5424 October 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 4–1 Friendly
5524 October 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 4–1 Friendly
5624 October 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 4–1 Friendly
5714 November 1954 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Austria.svg Austria 4–1 Friendly
588 December 1954 Hampden Park, Glasgow Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland 4–2 Friendly
598 May 1955 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo Flag of Norway.svg Norway 5–0 Friendly
6011 May 1955 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 7–3 Friendly
6111 May 1955 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 7–3 Friendly
6211 May 1955 Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 7–3 Friendly
6315 May 1955 Idrætsparken, Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark 6–0 Friendly
6415 May 1955 Idrætsparken, Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark 6–0 Friendly
6529 May 1955 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland 3–1 Friendly
6617 September 1955 Stade Olympique de la Pontaise, Lausanne Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 5–4 1954–1960 Dr. Gerö Cup
672 October 1955 Great Strahov Stadium, Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia 1–1 1954–1960 Dr. Gerö Cup
6816 October 1955 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Austria.svg Austria 6–1 1954–1960 Dr. Gerö Cup
693 June 1956 Stade du Heysel, Brussels Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium 4–5 Friendly
703 June 1956 Stade du Heysel, Brussels Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium 4–5 Friendly
719 June 1956 Estádio Nacional, Lisbon Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal 2–2 Friendly
7215 July 1956 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Poland.svg Poland 4–1 Friendly
7315 July 1956 Népstadion, Budapest Flag of Poland.svg Poland 4–1 Friendly
7416 September 1956 Stadion FK Crvena Zvezda, Belgrade Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Yugoslavia 3–1 1954–1960 Dr. Gerö Cup
757 October 1956 Parc des Princes, Paris Flag of France.svg France 2–1 Friendly

Honours

Olympic medal record
Representing Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
Men's Football
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1952 Helsinki Team competition

Club

Ferencváros TC
Honvéd FC
Barcelona

International

Hungary

Individual

Sources

See also

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References

  1. "Statistics and Records - FIFA World Cup™ - Players". FIFA.com. Retrieved 31 August 2018.
  2. "Wall of Fame: Sándor Kocsis". Infostrada Sports. Archived from the original on 1 February 2009. Retrieved 10 July 2016.
  3. Article from TheHardTackle
  4. "Sándor Kocsis". National Football Teams. Benjamin Strack-Zimmerman.
  5. http://www.rsssf.com/miscellaneous/kocsis-intlg.html
Records
Preceded by
Guillermo Stábile
8
FIFA World Cup Highest Goalscorer
30 June 1954 – 28 June 1958
Succeeded by
Just Fontaine
13