SEPTA subway–surface trolley lines

Last updated
Subway–surface trolley lines
Routes 10, 11, 13, 34, 36
SEPTACityTrolley.svg
SEPTA Subway-Surface underground.jpg
Route 11 trolley at 19th Street station
Overview
Type Trolley
System SEPTA City Transit Division
Locale Philadelphia, Yeadon, and Darby, PA
Termini Overbrook (Route 10)
Darby (Routes 11, 13)
Angora (Route 34)
Eastwick (Route 36)
13th Street (all lines)
Stations8 underground stations,
8 major surface stations
Services Route 10 (Lancaster Avenue)
Route 11 (Woodland Avenue)
Route 13 (Chester Avenue)
Route 34 (Baltimore Avenue)
Route 36 (Elmwood Avenue)
Daily ridership132,255
Train number(s)10, 11, 13, 34, 36
Website septa.org/service/trolley
Operation
Opened1906 (1906)
Owner SEPTA
Operator(s) SEPTA
CharacterUnderground and surface
Depot(s) Callowhill, Elmwood
Rolling stock Kawasaki K LRV cars
Technical
Line length63.7 km (39.6 mi) [1]
Track gauge PA gauge: 5 ft 2 14 in (1,581 mm) [2] [3]
Electrification Overhead line
Route map

Contents

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MFL
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13th Street–Market
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15th Street
MFL
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19th Street
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22nd Street
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30th Street
MFL
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33rd Street
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MFL
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  10   to Overbrook via Lancaster Ave
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36th Street Portal
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36th Street
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37th Street
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40th Street Portal
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  34   to Angora via Baltimore Ave
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  13   to Darby via Chester Ave
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  36   to Eastwick via Elmwood Ave
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  11   to Darby via Woodland Ave

The SEPTA subway–surface trolley lines are a collection of five SEPTA trolley lines that operate on street-level tracks in West Philadelphia and Delaware County, Pennsylvania, and also underneath Market Street in Philadelphia's Center City. The lines, Routes 10, 11, 13, 34, and 36, collectively operate on about 39.6 miles (63.7 km) of route. [1]

SEPTA's Route 15, the Girard Avenue Line, is another streetcar line that is designated green on route maps but is not part of the subway–surface system.

Like Boston's Green Line and San Francisco's Muni Metro, the SEPTA trolley line is the descendant of a pre-World War II streetcar system. Where Boston and San Francisco's systems use longer, articulated LRT vehicles, Philadelphia uses rigid vehicles roughly four inches longer than the PCC streetcar they replaced. The lines use Kawasaki K-Car LRVs delivered in 1981-82. The cars are similar to those on Routes 101 and 102, SEPTA's suburban trolley routes, which were delivered around the same time. However, the subway–surface cars are single-ended and use trolley poles, while the suburban lines use double ended cars and pantographs for power collection.

Route description

Center City

Starting from their eastern terminus at 13th Street Station near City Hall, the trolleys loop around in a tunnel under City Hall before stopping at under Dilworth Park at 15th Street station and then realign back under Market Street.

All five routes also stop at 19th Street, 22nd Street, 30th Street, and 33rd Street, which are all underground stations. From 15th to 30th Streets, they run in the same tunnel as SEPTA's Market–Frankford Line, which runs express on the inner tracks while the trolleys utilize the outer ones.

Passengers may transfer free of charge to the Market–Frankford Line at 13th, 15th, and 30th Streets, as well as to the Broad Street Line at 15th Street. Connections to the Regional Rail are also available via underground passageways connecting 13th and 15th Street stations to Suburban Station, one of the city's main commuter rail terminals.

University City

After traveling under the Schuylkill River, the trolley lines provide access to 30th Street Station, a passenger terminal located across the street from the trolley and rapid transit station. Connection is available to Regional Rail, many Amtrak services, and New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City Line. An underground passageway that connects these two stations is currently closed. [ citation needed ] The closure was due to passenger safety issues after a passenger attack in the 1990s. In 2016, the 30th Street Station District proposed overhauling both 30th Street Station's SEPTA and trolley stations including, by public demand, the reopening the tunnel that connects the two (currently separate) stations, thus ceasing the need for passengers to resurface, walk outside to cross the busy 30th Street, and then enter the other station. The timeline called for the tunnel overhaul to be part of Phase 1 and thus completed by 2020. [4]

All routes then stop at 33rd Street, near Drexel University. After this stop, Route 10 diverts from the others and emerges from the tunnel at the 36th Street Portal just south of Market Street, then turns north onto 36th Street and then northwest along Lancaster Avenue and other surface streets. The other four lines make underground stops at 36th and Sansom streets and 37th and Spruce streets on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania before surfacing at the 40th Street Portal near Baltimore Avenue, heading southwest on surface streets.

Points south and west

The Route 11 line travels along Woodland Avenue in Philadelphia and Main Street in Darby. It crosses a CSX Transportation railroad line at grade, one of very few at-grade crossing between a trolley line and a major freight rail line in the United States. (Another belongs to the TECO streetcar system in Tampa, Florida.) [5] [6]

Diversion services

All five trolleys can be diverted onto auxiliary surface tracks west of the 40th Street Portal when tunnels are closed due to maintenance, an accident, or some other obstruction.

Tracks for Route 10 start at Lancaster Avenue (Route 10) and proceed southbound along 40th Street. At Market Street, the line connects to the Market–Frankford Line at its 40th Street station. The surface tracks continue southbound to Spruce Street, where they split either eastbound or westbound. Westbound tracks run to 42nd Street where they turn south to either Baltimore Avenue (Route 34), Chester Avenue (Route 13), or Woodland Avenue (Routes 11 and 36).

Tracks for the other four routes run northbound along 42nd Street, then turning east onto Spruce Street and then north onto 38th Street (US 13). From here, it travels to Filbert Street, then turning left and crossing the 40th Street tracks. When Filbert Street terminates at 41st Street, the tracks turn right, and head north until reaching Lancaster Avenue. [7]

Another set of diversionary trolley tracks begin near the 49th Street Regional Rail station, connecting Chester Avenue to Woodland Avenue (where Routes 11 and 36 separate) by way of 49th Street.

History

College Hall and Logan Hall on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, as viewed from Woodland Avenue c. 1892. University of Pennsylvania College Hall.jpg
College Hall and Logan Hall on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, as viewed from Woodland Avenue c. 1892.
Schematic map of subway-surface branches and termini SEPTA Subway-Surface map.png
Schematic map of subway–surface branches and termini

The subway–surface lines are remnants of the far more extensive streetcar system that developed in Philadelphia after the arrival of electric trolleys in 1892. Several dozen traction companies were consolidated in 1902 into the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company. The PRT funneled the West Philadelphia lines into subway tunnels as they approached the city center. After the PRT declared bankruptcy in 1939, it was reopened as the Philadelphia Transportation Company (PTC), which was absorbed into SEPTA in 1968. [8]

In October 2006, University of Pennsylvania's class of 1956 funded the construction of an innovative portal for one of the eastbound entrances of the 37th Street station: a replica of a Peter Witt trolley of the kind manufactured by J. G. Brill and Company from 1923–26. Operated by the Philadelphia Transportation Company, these trolleys brought university students to the campus and to Center City until 1956. Routes 11, 34 and 37 ran through the Penn campus on Woodland Avenue and Locust Streets for nearly 65 years. In 1956, the trolley route was buried to enable the university to unify its campus, with Woodland Avenue and Locust Street becoming pedestrian walkways.

COVID-19 pandemic

The subway–surface lines has been operating "Lifeline Service" due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As of April 2020, Route 34 was completely suspended, and the remaining routes are bypassing the 36th Street, 33rd Street, 19th Street, and 13th Street stations in the Market Street tunnel. Service on Route 34 resumed on May 17, 2020. [9] [10]

Routes

All routes terminate at 15th Street station between 12:30 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. when 13th Street is closed. On Sunday evenings and during unexpected diversions, all routes are diverted to surface streets and terminate at 40th Street station. Former trolley routes, which have since been replaced with bus service, are shaded in gray.

RouteLength in
miles (km) [11]
Service beganService endedWestern terminusEastern terminusMain streets of travelDepotNotes
10 5.9 (9.5)c.1887 Overbrook: 63rd–Malvern Center City:
15th–Market (12:30-5:00am)
40th–Market (Sundays after 10pm)
13th–Market (all other times)
63rd Street, Lansdowne Avenue, Lancaster Avenue Callowhill
11 6.7 (10.8)1858 Darby Transportation Center Woodland Avenue Elmwood
13 6.9 (11.1)Chester Avenue Elmwood Some trips terminate at Yeadon Loop in Yeadon
30 1915 Haddington: 65th & Vine StreetsHaverford Avenue, Vine Street Callowhill Rerouted
31 1956 Overbrook Park: Lansdowne & Haverford Avenues Loop63rd Street, Market Street Callowhill Replaced by bus service
34 4.8 (7.7)1890 Angora: 61st–Baltimore Baltimore Avenue Elmwood
36 7.0 (11.3)1904 Eastwick: 80th–Eastwick Island Avenue, Elmwood Avenue Elmwood Some trips terminate at 73rd–Elmwood station in Eastwick
37 1955 Chester: 3rd & Crosby Streets Industrial Highway, Eastwick Avenue, Woodland Avenue Woodland Replaced by bus service
38 1955 Parkside: 48th Street & Parkside Avenue LoopParkside Avenue, 40th Street, Baring Street Callowhill Replaced by bus service
The interior of a Route 34 trolley in the Center City Tunnel. Septa34trolley.jpg
The interior of a Route 34 trolley in the Center City Tunnel.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Broad Street Line SEPTA subway line in Philadelphia, USA

The Broad Street Line (BSL)—also known as the Broad Street subway (BSS), Orange Line, or Broad Line—is a subway line owned by the city of Philadelphia and operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA). The line runs primarily north-south from the Fern Rock Transportation Center in North Philadelphia through Center City Philadelphia to NRG station at Pattison Avenue in South Philadelphia; the latter station provides access to the stadiums and arenas for the city's major professional sports teams at the South Philadelphia Sports Complex, about a quarter mile away. It is named for Broad Street, the street under which it runs for almost its entire length. The line, which is entirely underground except for the northern terminus at Fern Rock, has four tracks in a local/express configuration from Fern Rock to Walnut-Locust and two tracks from Lombard-South to the southern terminus at NRG station. It is one of only two rapid transit lines in the SEPTA system overall alongside the Market–Frankford Line, although Center City Philadelphia is also served by four stations of the PATCO Speedline rapid transit line which runs between downtown Philadelphia through Camden, New Jersey to Lindenwold, New Jersey. With more than 110,000 boardings on an average weekday, it is the second busiest route in the SEPTA system

Market–Frankford Line SEPTA rapid transit line in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The Market–Frankford Line (MFL), or the Blue Line) is one of two rapid transit lines in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the two lines are operated by SEPTA. The Market-Frankford Line runs from the 69th Street Transportation Center in Upper Darby, just outside of West Philadelphia, through Center City Philadelphia to the Frankford Transportation Center in Near Northeast Philadelphia. With more than 180,000 boardings on an average weekday, it is the busiest route in the SEPTA system. The line has both elevated and underground portions along its full length.

Transportation in Philadelphia

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69th Street Transportation Center Rapid transit station in Philadelphia

The 69th Street Transportation Center, also known as the 69th Street Terminal or 69th Street Station, is a SEPTA terminal in the Terminal Square section of Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, just outside the Philadelphia border. It is the other ground-level station on the Market Frankford Line besides Millbourne.

West Philadelphia Neighborhood of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

West Philadelphia, nicknamed West Philly, is a section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Though there is no official definition of its boundaries, it is generally considered to reach from the western shore of the Schuylkill River, to City Avenue to the northwest, Cobbs Creek to the southwest, and the SEPTA Media/Elwyn Line to the south. An alternate definition includes all city land west of the Schuylkill; this would also include Southwest Philadelphia and its neighborhoods. The eastern side of West Philadelphia is also known as University City.

SEPTA Route 15 SEPTA trolley line in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SEPTA's Route 15, the Girard Avenue Line, is a trolley line operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) along Girard Avenue through North and West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. As of 2007, it is the only surface trolley line in the City Transit Division that is not part of the Subway–Surface Trolley Lines. SEPTA PCC II vehicles are used on the line.

15th Street station (SEPTA) Rapid transit station in Philadelphia

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SEPTA Route 11 Philadelphia trolley line

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SEPTA Route 13 Philadelphia trolley line

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40th Street Portal Railway station in Philadelphia

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SEPTA Route 34 Trolley line in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SEPTA's Subway-Surface Trolley Route 34, also called the Baltimore Avenue-Subway Line, is a trolley line operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) that connects the 13th Street station in downtown Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to the Angora Loop station in the Angora neighborhood of West Philadelphia.

SEPTA Route 36 Philadelphia trolley line

SEPTA's Subway-Surface Trolley Route 36 is a trolley line operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) that connects the 13th Street station in downtown Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to the Eastwick Loop station in Eastwick section of Southwest Philadelphia, although limited service is available to the Elmwood Carhouse. It is the longest of the five lines that are part of the Subway-Surface Trolley system, and was even longer between 1956 and 1962 when the western terminus was at 94th and Eastwick Place. From 1962 through the 1970s it was at 88th Street and Eastwick Place, making the route 16.2 miles (26.1 km) long. Today, it only goes as far as what was once 80th Street.

SEPTA Route 10 Philadelphia trolley line

Route 10, also known as the Lancaster Avenue Line, is a trolley line operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) that connects the 13th Street station in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to the 63rd Street–Malvern Avenue station in the Overbrook section of West Philadelphia. It is one out of five lines that is part of the SEPTA's Subway-Surface Trolley system and is 11.6 mi (18.7 km) long.

13th Street station (SEPTA) Rapid transit station in Philadelphia

13th Street station is a SEPTA Market-Frankford Line and Subway-Surface Lines station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, under Market Street between 13th and Juniper Streets in Center City. The station serves the Market–Frankford Line and as the terminus for all five routes of the Subway–Surface Trolley Lines. The Subway–Surface Trolley station was known as Juniper Street until 2011. The trolleys now sign 13th–Market as their inbound destination.

22nd Street station (SEPTA) Subway station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

22nd Street station is a subway station in Center City Philadelphia that serves the SEPTA Subway–Surface Trolley Lines. Similar to 19th Street station, three blocks east of it, the station has two side platforms and a total of four tracks. The station serves only subway-surface trolleys on the two outer tracks; the Market-Frankford Line subway uses the two inner tracks and bypasses the station as it travels between 15th Street and 30th Street station. Since the station serves only trolleys, there is no fare collection at the station; all fares are paid on board the trolley itself. This will change with the SEPTA Key system, as turnstiles will be installed at this station.

40th Street station (Market–Frankford Line) Rapid transit station in Philadelphia

40th Street station is an underground station on the SEPTA Market-Frankford Line, below the intersection of 40th Street and Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the border between the Spruce Hill and Powelton Village neighborhoods in the University City District of West Philadelphia.

30th Street station (SEPTA subway) Rapid transit station in Philadelphia

30th Street station is an underground SEPTA rapid transit and trolley station in Philadelphia. It serves the Market–Frankford Line and SEPTA Subway–Surface Trolley Lines. It is located on Market Street between 30th and 31st Streets in the University City neighborhood near the main 30th Street Station and Drexel University. The station features four tracks—two outer tracks for the Subway-Surface trolleys, and two inner tracks for the Market-Frankford subway trains. A free transfer is available between both services via a mezzanine level which provides access to all four tracks. The main entrance is located on the northwest corner of 30th and Market. Major renovations to this entrance are planned thanks to a grant from the United States Department of Transportation. A second entrance at the corner of 31st Street reopened in late 2019 following improvements, including new elevators.

SEPTA Route 60

SEPTA's Trolley Route 60, the Allegheny Avenue Line is a former streetcar line and current bus route, operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) in Northwest and Northeast Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It connects to the East Falls to the Port Richmond, and runs primarily along Allegheny Avenue.

Callowhill Depot is a bus and trolley barn operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), located in West Philadelphia, near the Delaware County border. It was built in 1913 by the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company (PRT) and was later operated by the Philadelphia Transportation Company (PTC) before being taken over by SEPTA. The depot was constructed as part of the Thomas E. Mitten modernization program. Since its construction, the depot has suffered fire damage and reconstruction in 1949, 1950, and 1995.

References

  1. 1 2 Smith, Jr., Bill W. (November 2011). "U.S. Urban Rail Transit Lines Opened From 1980" (pdf). SEPTA.org. pp. 1–100. Retrieved 2013-11-02.
  2. "The history of trolley cars and routes in Philadelphia". SEPTA. June 1, 1974. p. 2. Retrieved 2014-06-11. An early city ordinance prescribed that all tracks were to have a gauge of 5' 2 14.
  3. Hilton, George W.; Due, John Fitzgerald (January 1, 2000). The Electric Interurban Railways in America. Stanford University Press. Retrieved 2014-06-10. Worst of all, not all city systems were built to the standard American and European gauge of 4'-8 12". Pittsburgh and most other Pennsylvania cities used 5'-2 12", which became known as the Pennsylvania trolley gauge. Cincinnati used 5'-2 12", Philadelphia 5'-2 14", Columbus 5'-2", Altoona 5'-3", Louisville and Camden 5'-0", Canton and Pueblo 4'-0", Denver, Tacoma, and Los Angeles 3'-6", Toronto an odd 4'-10 78", and Baltimore a vast 5'-4 12.
  4. "30th Street Station District draft plan: Reopen SEPTA tunnel by 2020, cap rail yards by 2050". PlanPhilly | 30th Street Station District draft plan: Reopen SEPTA tunnel by 2020, cap rail yards by 2050. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  5. Philadelphia Transit; Streetcars;Route 11 (Kavanaugh Transit Systems)
  6. davidwilson1949 (July 6, 2003). 20030706 26 Main St. Crossing CSXT in Darby (6071320235) (photograph). Retrieved December 31, 2015.
  7. SEPTA trolley lines map
  8. "Studio 34's Eponymous Trolley, or, A Short History of Route 34" . Retrieved 2008-03-11.
  9. "Service Information". SEPTA . Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  10. "SEPTA Transit Network Lifeline Service Schedule" (PDF). SEPTA. April 2020. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  11. "SEPTA - Spring 2012 Route Statistics" (PDF). Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. 2012. Retrieved 2013-06-28.

Route map:

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