Sailor Moon (TV series)

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  1. Sailor Moon end credits (DiC dub, 1995)
  2. Sailor Moon DIC/Optimum dub, episodes 1-82 (1-89 uncut)

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<i>Sailor Moon</i> Manga series by Naoko Takeuchi

Sailor Moon is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Naoko Takeuchi. It was originally serialized in Kodansha's shōjo manga magazine Nakayoshi from 1991 to 1997; the 52 individual chapters were published in 18 volumes. The series follows the adventures of a schoolgirl named Usagi Tsukino as she transforms into Sailor Moon to search for a magical artifact, the "Legendary Silver Crystal". She leads a group of comrades, the Sailor Soldiers, called Sailor Guardians in later editions, as they battle against villains to prevent the theft of the Silver Crystal and the destruction of the Solar System.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sailor Moon (character)</span> Fictional character from the franchise of the same name

Usagi Tsukino, better known as Sailor Moon, is a Japanese superheroine and the main protagonist and title character of the Sailor Moon manga series written by Naoko Takeuchi. She is introduced in chapter #1, "Usagi – Sailor Moon", as a carefree Japanese schoolgirl who can transform into Sailor Moon. Initially believing herself to be an ordinary girl, she is later revealed to be the reincarnated form of the Princess of the Moon Kingdom, and she subsequently discovers her original name, Princess Serenity.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sailor Pluto</span> Character in Sailor Moon

Sailor Pluto is a fictional character in the Sailor Moon manga series written by Naoko Takeuchi. The alternate identity of Setsuna Meiou, she is a member of the Sailor Guardians, female supernatural fighters who protect the Solar System from evil.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tuxedo Mask</span> Character in Sailor Moon

Tuxedo Mask, also known as Mamoru Chiba, is a fictional character and one of the primary protagonists of the Sailor Moon media franchise created by Naoko Takeuchi. He disguises himself in order to support the series' central heroines, the Sailor Guardians. Wearing a mask to conceal his identity, he interferes with enemy operations, offers the Sailor Guardians advice, and sometimes physically aids them in battle.

<i>Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon</i> (2003 TV series) Japanese television program

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon is a Japanese tokusatsu superhero television series based on the Sailor Moon manga created by Naoko Takeuchi. It was produced by Toei Company.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sailor Neptune</span> Character from Sailor Moon

Sailor Neptune is a fictional lead character in the Sailor Moon media franchise. Her alternate identity is Michiru Kaiou, a teenage Japanese schoolgirl. Michiru is a member of the Sailor Soldiers, female supernatural fighters who protect the Solar System from evil.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dark Kingdom</span> Group of fictional antagonists in the Sailor Moon franchise

The Dark Kingdom is a group of fictional characters in the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi. They are the chief villains of the first story arc in every version of the series, and were first introduced in the first chapter of the manga, "Usagi – Sailor Moon", originally published in Japan's Nakayoshi on 28 December 1991. In some English adaptations, the Dark Kingdom's title was changed to Negaverse.

<i>Sailor Moon SuperS</i> Fourth season of the Sailor Moon anime series

The fourth season of the Sailor Moon anime series, Sailor Moon SuperS was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara. It adapts the "Dream" arc of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi and follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Super Sailor Guardians. The series is divided into two story arcs: the first arc for 22 episodes depicts a mighty deity known as Pegasus, entering Chibiusa's dreams to flee from the Amazon Trio, minions of the Dead Moon Circus, who are trying to steal the legendary Golden Crystal from him. The second arc for 17 episodes depicts the arrival of the Amazoness Quartet, a group of enemies who dream of remaining young forever, as well as Queen Nehelenia, the depraved ruler of the Dead Moon Circus.

<i>Sailor Moon Sailor Stars</i> Fifth and last season of the Sailor Moon anime series

The fifth and final season of the Sailor Moon anime series, Sailor Moon Sailor Stars or simply Sailor Stars was directed by Takuya Igarashi and produced by Toei Animation. Like the rest of the Sailor Moon series, it follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Sailor Guardians. The series is divided into two story arcs. The first 6 episodes consist of a self-contained arc in which the Sailor Guardians encounter Queen Nehelenia again. The remaining 28 episodes adapt material from the "Stars" act of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi, in which the Sailor Guardians meet up with the Sailor Starlights, led by Princess Kakyuu. They discover that Sailor Galaxia, the leader of the "Shadow Galactica" organization and a corrupted Sailor Guardian, plans to increase her powers and rule the Milky Way.

<i>Sailor Moon R</i> Second season of the Sailor Moon anime series

The second season of the Sailor Moon anime series Sailor Moon R, was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Junichi Sato and Kunihiko Ikuhara. According to the booklet from the Sailor Moon Memorial Song Box, the letter "R" stands for the word "Romance", "Return" or "Rose".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dead Moon Circus</span> Group of fictional antagonists in the Sailor Moon franchise

The Dead Moon Circus are a group of fictional characters from the Sailor Moon manga series created by Naoko Takeuchi. They serve as the main antagonists of the fourth arc, called Dream in the manga, Sailor Moon SuperS in its first anime adaptation, and Sailor Moon Eternal in the second anime adaptation. They are first introduced in chapter #34 "Dream 1 – Eclipse Dream", originally published in Japan on September 6, 1995. In the original English dubbed anime, they are called the "Dark Moon Circus".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Black Moon Clan</span> Fictional characters in Sailor Moon

The Black Moon Clan is a group of fictional characters in the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi. It comprises the main villains of the second major story arc, which is called the Black Moon in the manga and Sailor Moon Crystal, and which fills most of Sailor Moon R season of the first anime adaptation. They are first introduced in chapter #14 "Black Moon Kōan – Sailor Mars", first published in Nakayoshi on March 3, 1993. In the DIC English adaptation, their name is changed to the "Negamoon Family".

<i>Sailor Moon R: The Movie</i> 1993 first of the Sailor Moon films directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara

Sailor Moon R: The Movie is a 1993 Japanese animated superhero fantasy film directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara and written by Sukehiro Tomita based on the Sailor Moon manga series written by Naoko Takeuchi. The film takes its name from the second arc of the Sailor Moon anime, Sailor Moon R, as Toei Company distributed it around the same time. The events portrayed seem to take place somewhere in the very end of the series, as Chibiusa knows about the identities of the Sailor Guardians, the characters are in the present rather than the future, and Usagi and Mamoru are back together. The film centers on the arrival of an alien named Fiore on Earth, who has a past with Mamoru and wishes to reunite with him. However, Fiore is being controlled by an evil flower called Xenian Flower, forcing Usagi and her friends to save Mamoru and the Earth from destruction.

<i>Sailor Moon S: The Movie</i> 1994 Japanese animated film directed by Hiroki Shibata

Sailor Moon S: The Movie is a 1994 Japanese animated superhero fantasy film directed by Hiroki Shibata and written by Sukehiro Tomita. It is the second film in the series, following Sailor Moon R: The Movie (1993), and is loosely adapted from a side story of the original Sailor Moon manga series created by Naoko Takeuchi, The Lover of Princess Kaguya. It takes its name from the third arc of the Sailor Moon anime series, Sailor Moon S, as Toei Company distributed it around the same time. The film was released in Japan on December 4, 1994, as part of the Winter '94 Toei Anime Fair.

<i>Sailor Moon SuperS: The Movie</i> 1995 film by Hiroki Shibata

Sailor Moon SuperS: The Movie is a 1995 Japanese animated superhero fantasy film directed by Hiroki Shibata, written by Yōji Enokido, and based on the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi. It takes its name from the fourth arc of the Sailor Moon anime, Sailor Moon SuperS, as Toei Company distributed it around the same time.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chibiusa</span> Character in the Sailor Moon franchise

Chibiusa is a fictional main character from the Sailor Moon manga series created by Naoko Takeuchi. She is one of the main characters of the series. She is introduced in Chapter 14, "Conclusion and Commencement, Petite Étrangere", first published in Nakayoshi on July 6, 1993. She is a small child from the 30th century who time travels to the past to seek help from the Sailor Soldiers. She later returns, a few years older, in order to train as a Soldier herself—Sailor Chibi Moon, translated as "Sailor Mini Moon" in the DIC and Cloverway English adaptations.

<i>Sailor Moon Crystal</i> 2014 Japanese anime series

Sailor Moon Crystal, known in Japan as Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Crystal, is a 2014 original net animation adaptation of the shōjo manga series Sailor Moon written and illustrated by Naoko Takeuchi, produced in commemoration of the original series' 20th anniversary. Produced by Toei Animation and directed by Munehisa Sakai and Chiaki Kon, the series was streamed worldwide on Niconico from July 5, 2014, to July 18, 2015. Season 1 and 2's episodes were released twice a month. Instead of remaking the 1990s anime series preceding it, Toei Animation produced Crystal as a reboot of Sailor Moon and as a more faithful adaptation of the original manga by omitting much of the original material from the first series. The story focuses on Usagi Tsukino, who is a young girl that obtains the power to become the titular character. Other Sailor Guardians join her in the search for Princess Serenity and the Silver Crystal.

<i>Sailor Moon Eternal</i> 2021 two-part film directed by Chiaki Kon

Sailor Moon Eternal is a 2021 Japanese two-part animated action fantasy film based on the Dream arc of the Sailor Moon manga by Naoko Takeuchi, that serves as a direct continuation and a "fourth season" for the Sailor Moon Crystal anime series. The two-part film is directed by Chiaki Kon, written by Kazuyuki Fudeyasu, chief supervised by Naoko Takeuchi, and co-produced by Toei Animation and Studio Deen. The two-part film was released in Japan in 2021, with the first film on January 8, and the second film on February 11.

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Sailor Moon
Sailor Moon Updated Logo.svg
美少女戦士セーラームーン
(Bishōjo Senshi Sērā Mūn)
Genre Magical girl