Saint-Valery-en-Caux

Last updated
Saint-Valery-en-Caux
0 Saint-Valery-en-Caux - Port et centre-ville.JPG
The marina and town centre
Blason ville fr Saint-Valery-en-Caux (Seine-Maritime).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Saint-Valery-en-Caux
France location map-Regions and departements-2016.svg
Red pog.svg
Saint-Valery-en-Caux
Normandie region location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Saint-Valery-en-Caux
Coordinates: 49°51′40″N0°42′36″E / 49.861°N 0.710°E / 49.861; 0.710 Coordinates: 49°51′40″N0°42′36″E / 49.861°N 0.710°E / 49.861; 0.710
Country France
Region Normandy
Department Seine-Maritime
Arrondissement Dieppe
Canton Saint-Valery-en-Caux
Intercommunality CC Côte d'Albâtre
Government
  Mayor (20142020) Dominique Chauvel
Area
1
10.47 km2 (4.04 sq mi)
Population
(2015)2
4,209
  Density400/km2 (1,000/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
76655 /76460
Elevation0–80 m (0–262 ft)
(avg. 5 m or 16 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Saint-Valery-en-Caux is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

The commune is a level of administrative division in the French Republic. French communes are analogous to civil townships and incorporated municipalities in the United States and Canada, Gemeinden in Germany or comuni in Italy. The United Kingdom has no exact equivalent, as communes resemble districts in urban areas, but are closer to parishes in rural areas where districts are much larger. Communes are based on historical geographic communities or villages and are vested with significant powers to manage the populations and land of the geographic area covered. The communes are the fourth-level administrative divisions of France.

Seine-Maritime Department of France

Seine-Maritime is a department of France in the Normandy region of northern France. It is situated on the northern coast of France, at the mouth of the Seine, and includes the cities of Rouen and Le Havre. Until 1955 it was named Seine-Inférieure.

In the administrative divisions of France, the department is one of the three levels of government below the national level, between the administrative regions and the commune. Ninety-six departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as regions. Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.

Contents

The house called "Henry IV" (16th century). 0 Saint-Valery-en-Caux - Maison dite de Henri IV.JPG
The house called "Henry IV" (16th century).

Geography

A small fishing port and light industrial town situated in the Pays de Caux, some 20 miles (32 km) west of Dieppe at the junction of the D53, D20, D79 and the D925 roads. Here, huge chalk cliffs rise up from the pebble beach (sandy at low tide) to overlook the English Channel. The SNCF station is no longer in use and the only way to get out of this beautiful town is by bus - which are few and far between.

Fishing activity of trying to catch fish

Fishing is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. “Fishing” may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not normally applied to catching farmed fish, or to aquatic mammals, such as whales where the term whaling is more appropriate. In addition to being caught to be eaten, fish are caught as recreational pastimes. Fishing tournaments are held, and caught fish are sometimes kept as preserved or living trophies. When bioblitzes occur, fish are typically caught, identified, and then released.

Pays de Caux

The Pays de Caux is an area in Normandy occupying the greater part of the French département of Seine Maritime in Normandy. It is a chalk plateau to the north of the Seine Estuary and extending to the cliffs on the English Channel coast; its coastline is known as the Côte d'Albâtre. In the east, it borders on the Pays de Bray where the strata below the chalk show through.

Chalk A soft, white, porous sedimentary rock made of calcium carbonate

Chalk is a soft, white, porous, sedimentary carbonate rock, a form of limestone composed of the mineral calcite. Calcite is an ionic salt called calcium carbonate or CaCO3. It forms under reasonably deep marine conditions from the gradual accumulation of minute calcite shells (coccoliths) shed from micro-organisms called coccolithophores. Flint (a type of chert) is very common as bands parallel to the bedding or as nodules embedded in chalk. It is probably derived from sponge spicules or other siliceous organisms as water is expelled upwards during compaction. Flint is often deposited around larger fossils such as Echinoidea which may be silicified (i.e. replaced molecule by molecule by flint).

History

It is said to have been founded by Saint Valery in the 7th century. A monastery was built on the site of the present-day town and was known as ‘’’Sanctum Walaricum’’’ in 990 CE, according to the charter in which Richard I, Duke of Normandy, gave the town (part of his personal property) to the abbey of Fecamp. A busy fishing port from the 13th to the 17th century, its decline was due to the growth of the much larger port of Fecamp, to the west.

Saint Walric (†622) was the founder of the abbey of Leuconay on the Somme River.

Common Era or Current Era (CE) is one of the notation systems for the world's most widely used calendar era. BCE is the era before CE. BCE and CE are alternatives to the Dionysian AD and BC system. The Dionysian era distinguishes eras using AD and BC. Since the two notation systems are numerically equivalent, "2019 CE" corresponds to "AD 2019" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC". Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar. The year-numbering system utilized by the Gregorian calendar is used throughout the world today, and is an international standard for civil calendars.

It is perhaps best known as the place where the Scottish 51st (Highland) Infantry Division commanded by Major General Victor Fortune and French troops surrendered to Erwin Rommel on June 12, 1940. The town was largely destroyed in the fighting in 1940. During the action, French cavalry on horseback faced German panzer tanks.[ citation needed ] (Cavalry were used for reconnaissance and marauding, not frontal attack). Saint-Valéry-en-Caux was liberated on 11 September 1944 by the 51st Highland division. [1] On 17 January 1945, the railway station was destroyed when a runaway train full of American troops crashed into it. Eighty-nine American soldiers were killed and 152 were injured. [2]
A lively and interesting little town that boasts a casino, waterpark and the maximum four flowers on the France in Bloom placards. Tourism now accounts for much of the town's prosperity.

51st (Highland) Division infantry division of the British Army

The 51st (Highland) Division was an infantry division of the British Army that fought on the Western Front in France during the First World War from 1915 to 1918. The division was raised in 1908, upon the creation of the Territorial Force, as the Highland Division and later 51st (Highland) Division from 1915. The division's insignia was a stylised 'HD' inside a red circle. Early doubts about the division's performance earned it the nickname of "Harper's Duds" after the name of its commander, Major-General George Harper. The division was renamed the 51st (Highland) Infantry Division and fought during the Second World War as part of the Territorial Army after the Territorial Force was disbanded in 1920. The division was nicknamed the "Highway Decorators" in reference to the 'HD' insignia that adorned road signs along their axis of advance.

Victor Fortune British Army general

Major General Sir Victor Morven Fortune was a senior officer of the British Army. He saw service in both World War I and World War II. He commanded the 51st (Highland) Infantry Division during the Battle of France and was subsequently trapped and obliged to surrender to the Germans on 12 June 1940.

Erwin Rommel German field marshal of World War II

Erwin Rommel was a German general and military theorist. Popularly known as the Desert Fox, he served as field marshal in the Wehrmacht of Nazi Germany during World War II.

Heraldry

Arms of Saint-Valery-en-Caux Blason ville fr Saint-Valery-en-Caux (Seine-Maritime).svg
Arms of Saint-Valery-en-Caux
The arms of Saint-Valery-en-Caux are blazoned  :
Azure, 2 dolphins addorsed argent.

Population

Historical population of Saint-Valery-en-Caux
Year1962196819751982199019992006
Population2905308932745501459547824733
From the year 1962 on: No double countingresidents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel) are counted only once.

Places of interest

Normandy Administrative region of France

Normandy is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly referring to the historical Duchy of Normandy.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) is an intergovernmental organisation of six independent member states whose principal function is to mark, record and maintain the graves and places of commemoration of Commonwealth of Nations military service members who died in the two World Wars. The Commission is also responsible for commemorating Commonwealth civilians who died as a result of enemy action during World War II. The Commission was founded by Sir Fabian Ware and constituted through Royal Charter in 1917 named the Imperial War Graves Commission. The change to the present name took place in 1960.

Cloister open space surrounded by covered walks or open galleries

A cloister is a covered walk, open gallery, or open arcade running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth. The attachment of a cloister to a cathedral or church, commonly against a warm southern flank, usually indicates that it is part of a monastic foundation, "forming a continuous and solid architectural barrier... that effectively separates the world of the monks from that of the serfs and workmen, whose lives and works went forward outside and around the cloister."

People

Charles Defrémery was a 19th-century French orientalist, specialist in Arabic and Persian history and literature.

Demba Ba Senegalese football player

Demba Ba is a Senegalese professional footballer who plays as a striker for Turkish club İstanbul Başakşehir and the Senegal national team.

Twin towns

See also

Related Research Articles

Fécamp Commune in Normandy, France

Fécamp is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Harfleur Commune in Normandy, France

Harfleur is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region of northern France.

Le Tréport Commune in Normandy, France

Le Tréport is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in Normandy, France.

Yport Commune in Normandy, France

Yport is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France. The residents are known as Yportais or Yportaises.

Saint-Martin-aux-Buneaux Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Martin-aux-Buneaux is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Saint-Pierre-en-Port Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Pierre-en-Port is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Flamets-Frétils Commune in Normandy, France

Flamets-Frétils is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Senneville-sur-Fécamp Commune in Normandy, France

Senneville-sur-Fécamp is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer, Seine-Maritime Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Bordeaux-Saint-Clair Commune in Normandy, France

Bordeaux-Saint-Clair is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Quiberville Commune in Normandy, France

Quiberville is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Saint-Jouin-Bruneval Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Jouin-Bruneval is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Saint-Laurent-en-Caux Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Laurent-en-Caux is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Criquebeuf-en-Caux Commune in Normandy, France

Criquebeuf-en-Caux is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Veulettes-sur-Mer Commune in Normandy, France

Veulettes-sur-Mer is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Saint-Léonard, Seine-Maritime Commune in Normandy, France

Saint-Léonard is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

Sommesnil Commune in Normandy, France

Sommesnil is a commune in the Seine-Maritime department in the Normandy region in northern France.

The Canton of Saint-Valery-en-Caux is a canton situated in the Seine-Maritime département and in the Normandy region of northern France.

The Canton of Fécamp is a canton in the Seine-Maritime département and in the Normandy region of northern France.

The Communauté d'agglomération de Fécamp Caux Littoral is the communauté d'agglomération, an intercommunal structure, centred on the town of Fécamp. It is located in the Seine-Maritime department, in the Normandy region, northern France. It was created on 1 January 2015 from the former communauté de communes de Fécamp. It absorbed the former Communauté de communes du Canton de Valmont on 1 January 2017. Its population was 40,358 in 2015, of which 19,591 in Fécamp proper. Its seat is in Fécamp.

References