Saitama Stadium 2002

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Saitama Stadium 2002
Saisuta
Saitama stadium2002-1.jpg
Saitama Stadium 2002
Location Midori-ku, Saitama, Saitama Prefecture, Japan
Coordinates 35°54′11.31″N139°43′2.97″E / 35.9031417°N 139.7174917°E / 35.9031417; 139.7174917 Coordinates: 35°54′11.31″N139°43′2.97″E / 35.9031417°N 139.7174917°E / 35.9031417; 139.7174917
Public transit Saitama Railway Logo.svg Saitama Rapid Railway Line at Urawa-Misono
Owner Saitama Prefecture
OperatorSaitama Prefectural Park Association
Capacity 63,700 [1]
Record attendance63,551 (Japan vs Oman, 3 June 2012)
Field size105 x 68 m
SurfaceGrass
Opened1 October 2001
Tenants
Urawa Red Diamonds (2001–present)
Omiya Ardija (2005–2007)
Japan national football team (2001–2020)

Saitama Stadium 2002 (埼玉スタジアム2002, Saitama Sutajiamu Niimarumarunii), often called Saitama Stadium (埼玉スタジアム, Saitama Sutajiamu) or simply Saisuta (埼スタ), is a football stadium located in Midori-ku, Saitama, Saitama Prefecture, Japan.

Contents

Currently J1 League football club Urawa Red Diamonds use this stadium for home games. It is one of the largest football specific stadiums in Asia. It is one of the planned football venues for the 2020 Summer Olympics. [2]

Location

The stadium is a 15 to 20 minute walk from Urawa-Misono Station on the Saitama Railway Line.

History

Built by Azusa Sekkei to host matches of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, construction was completed in September 2001. The stadium holds 63,700 people, although for segregation reasons league games hosted at the ground have a reduced capacity of 62,300. The Saitama Stadium hosted four matches during the 2002 FIFA World Cup, including co-host Japan's first match against Belgium.

Between 2005 and 2007, the Urawa Red Diamonds' local derby rival Omiya Ardija hosted matches here along with Urawa Komaba due to expansion of its home Ōmiya Park Soccer Stadium.

2002 FIFA World Cup

The stadium was one of the venues of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, and held the following matches:

DateTeam 1ResultTeam 2Round
2 June 2002Flag of England.svg  England 1–1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Group F
4 June 2002Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2–2Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Group H
6 June 2002Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 1–0Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia Group E
26 June 2002Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1–0Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Semi-finals

Features

Saitama Stadium 2002 Saitama Stadium 20130604.JPG
Saitama Stadium 2002

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References

  1. "Saitama Stadium 2002 Information". Saitama Stadium 2002. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
  2. "Venue Plan". Tokyo 2020 Bid Committee. Archived from the original on 27 July 2013. Retrieved 11 September 2013.
Events and tenants
Preceded by
National Stadium
All Japan High School Soccer Tournament
finals venue

2014–present
Succeeded by
TBD
Preceded by
National Stadium
Host of the
J.League Cup finals

2014–present
Succeeded by
current