Salonius

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Saint Salonius
Born 400
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Feast 28 September

Saint Salonius was a confessor and bishop of the 5th century. He was born about 400, a son of St. Eucherius of Lyon. He was educated at Lérins Abbey, first by St. Hilary of Arles, then by Salvianus and St. Vincent of Lérins. In 440, he was elected bishop of Geneva and, as such, took part in the Synod of Orange (441), the Synod of Vaison (442), and the Synod of Arles (451). He has also been listed as the bishop of Genoa, but it is not clear if this was a later appointment or if the word Geneva was miswritten as Genova. He was an accomplished Latin ecclesiastical writer. Most notably, he composed mystical and allegorical interpretations of the Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. His feast day is 28 September.

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References

Frederick George Holweck was a German-American Roman Catholic parish priest and scholar, hagiographer and church historian. Monsignor Holweck contributed a number of articles to the Catholic Encyclopedia.