Salonius

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Salonius of Geneva
Bishop and Confessor
Bornc. 400
Lyon, France
Died28 September 475
Geneva, Switzerland
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Canonized Pre-Congregation
Feast 28 September
Attributes Bishop vestment
Miter
Crosier
Patronage Lyon

Salonius (c. 400 – 28 September 475) known as Salonius of Geneva was a confessor and bishop of the 5th century, A son of Eucherius of Lyon and Galla. He was educated at Lérins Abbey, first by Hilary of Arles, then by Salvianus and Vincent of Lérins. In 440, he was elected bishop of Geneva and, as such, took part in the Synod of Orange (441), the Synod of Vaison (442), and the Synod of Arles (451). He has also been listed as the bishop of Genoa, but it is not clear if this was a later appointment or if the word Geneva was miswritten as Genova. He was an accomplished Latin ecclesiastical writer. Most notably, he composed mystical and allegorical interpretations of the Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. His feast day is 28 September.

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