Samjiyon

Last updated
Samjiyŏn

삼지연시
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Samjiyŏn-si
   Revised Romanization Samjiyeon-si
Samjiyon.jpg
View of Samjiyon in 2008
DPRK2006 Ryanggang-Samjiyon.PNG
Map of Ryanggang showing the location of Samjiyon
Samjiyon
North Korea adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Samjiyŏn
Location within North Korea
Coordinates: 41°48′N128°19′E / 41.800°N 128.317°E / 41.800; 128.317 Coordinates: 41°48′N128°19′E / 41.800°N 128.317°E / 41.800; 128.317
Country North Korea
Province Ryanggang
Administrative divisions 10 dong, 6 ri
Area
  Total1,326.14 km2 (512.03 sq mi)
Elevation
1,381 m (4,531 ft)
Population
 (2008)
  Total31,471 [1]
  Dialect
Hamgyŏng
Time zone UTC+9 (Pyongyang Time)

Samjiyŏn is a city in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It takes its name from three lakes in the city, which are collectively known as the Samjiyŏn. Samjiyŏn is situated near Mount Paektu, and tour groups fly to the city's airport to see the mountain, which holds significance in North Korean mythology.

Contents

Many houses and buildings in Samjiyŏn have been upgraded in recent decades, and many new buildings, including a recreational centre for youths, were finished in 2005. Popular activities in Samjiyŏn are skiing and various activities for schoolchildren, who use the surrounding area of Mt. Paektu for various scouting-like operations in conjunction with school-led vacations or outings.

In December 2019, Kim Jong-un opened a completed expansion of the existing township, described by state media as a "modern" city with residences and industrial parks. [2] The city was known as a county until the decision of an upgraded its status in December 2019. The modernization of Samjiyon City is to also help boost tourism to North Korea (DPRK). [3]

Administrative divisions

Samjiyŏn is divided into 10 dong (neighborhoods) and 6 ri (villages):

  • Ikkal-dong (이깔동)
  • Kwangmyŏngsŏng-dong (광명성동)
  • Mubong-dong (무봉동)
  • Ohomultong-dong (5호물동동)
  • Paektusanmiryŏng-dong (백두산밀영동)
  • Pegaebong-dong (베개봉동)
  • P'ot'ae-dong (포태동)
  • Ponnamu-dong (봇나무동)
  • Rimyŏngsu-dong (리명수동)
  • Sinmusŏng-dong (신무성동)
  • Chunghŭng-ri (중흥리)
  • Hŭnggyesu-ri (흥계수리)
  • Sobaeksan-ri (소백산리)
  • Paeksam-ri (백삼리)
  • Posŏ-ri (보서리)
  • T'ongsin-ri (통신리)

Transportation

Air

Samjiyon Airport Samjiyon Airport (14560530404).jpg
Samjiyŏn Airport

Samjiyŏn is served by the Korean People's Air Force along with the national flag carrier Air Koryo which operates scheduled flights and charter services between Samjiyŏn and P'yŏngyang, Wŏnsan and Ch'ŏngjin. In 2005, the airport was closed due to major renovations, which were partially underwritten by the Hyundai corporation.

Rail

Samjiyŏn city is served by the narrow-gauge Samjiyŏn Line of the Korean State Railway. Construction of a new, 78 kilometres (48 mi) standard-gauge line from the Pukbunaeryuk Line at Hyesan to Samjiyŏn is underway since 2008, with 80% of the roadbed and 70% of lineside structures being complete as of June 2015; [4] the new terminus station is to be at Chunghŭng-ri, Samjiyŏn city. [5]

Hyesan No.1/Wangdŏk Railway Station

The current presidential train station is located near Ŭihwa-ri in Poch'ŏn county, Ryanggang, in a very narrow gorge, making aerial attack difficult. The facilities of this station are much more sophisticated than the nearby civilian Hyesan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Station. [6] Officially called Hyesan No.1 Railway Station, it is commonly known as Wangdŏk Station due to the original 1985 station having been built only 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) from Wangdŏk. [6]

The first station was built in 1985, but as it was easily viewed from China, in 1989 it was destroyed and moved to a second site, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) north of the current third site. However, on inspecting the completed facilities, Kim Il-sung deemed it unsuitable, as it was in view of China's mountains. Ordering a third rebuild, the second station was taken over by the Samjiyŏn Precision Machinery Factory (the No. 95 Munitions Factory) after completion of the current, third site, in 1992. [6] This third station is located directly on the Paektu Mountain Tourist Road, which gives direct access to Kim Il-sung's palace compound. 20 civilian personnel and two military squads protect the area immediately around the station. During the annual presidential visit in July or August, the entire civilian population is employed to clean the transportation system and local environment. [6]

Tourism

The Samjiyon Grand Monument Laika ac Samjiyon Grand Monument (7998446015).jpg
The Samjiyon Grand Monument

The Samjiyon Grand Monument consists of four groups of sculptures called On the Battlefield, Fatherland, Longing, and Forwards. [7]

Presidential palaces

Samjiyŏn has been a holiday resort and destination for two presidents of North Korea. Both Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il have established palaces and compounds in the area, accessed by a specially developed and exclusive railway station for the presidential train.

Climate

Samjiyon has a subarctic climate (Köppen climate classification Dwc) with cool summers and cold, dry winters.

Climate data for Samjiyon (1981–2010)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)−11.1
(12.0)
−7.2
(19.0)
−1.6
(29.1)
7.2
(45.0)
14.5
(58.1)
19.3
(66.7)
21.7
(71.1)
21.7
(71.1)
16.2
(61.2)
9.2
(48.6)
−1.1
(30.0)
−8.5
(16.7)
6.7
(44.1)
Daily mean °C (°F)−17.2
(1.0)
−14
(7)
−7.8
(18.0)
1.4
(34.5)
8.1
(46.6)
12.9
(55.2)
16.2
(61.2)
15.8
(60.4)
9.6
(49.3)
2.4
(36.3)
−7
(19)
−14.1
(6.6)
0.5
(32.9)
Average low °C (°F)−23.8
(−10.8)
−21.3
(−6.3)
−15.3
(4.5)
−5
(23)
1.6
(34.9)
6.8
(44.2)
11.4
(52.5)
10.5
(50.9)
3.0
(37.4)
−4.1
(24.6)
−12.6
(9.3)
−20.2
(−4.4)
−5.7
(21.7)
Average precipitation mm (inches)18.1
(0.71)
19.0
(0.75)
36.6
(1.44)
60.0
(2.36)
89.3
(3.52)
141.8
(5.58)
214.0
(8.43)
149.4
(5.88)
81.0
(3.19)
41.6
(1.64)
40.2
(1.58)
24.3
(0.96)
915.3
(36.04)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.1 mm)9.89.212.612.016.116.919.715.410.19.012.712.2155.7
Average snowy days16.315.017.513.34.10.20.10.10.97.116.918.0109.5
Average relative humidity (%)76.973.069.465.667.476.984.583.377.068.774.977.474.6
Source: Korea Meteorological Administration [8]

Sport

It has one of the three speed skating ovals in the country. [9]

See also

Related Research Articles

Hyesan Municipal City in Ryanggang

Hyesan is a city in the northern part of Ryanggang province of North Korea. It is a hub of river transportation as well as a product distribution centre. It is also the administrative centre of Ryanggang Province. As of 2008, the population of the city is 192,680.

Ryanggang Province Province of North Korea

Ryanggang Province is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China (Jilin) on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang"

Pochon County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Poch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It looks westward across the Amrok River at China.

Unhung County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Unhŭng County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea from portions of Hyesan and Kapsan.

Rail transport in North Korea

Rail transport in North Korea is provided by Korean State Railway which is the only rail operator in North Korea. It has a network of over 6,000 km of track, of which the vast majority is standard gauge; there is, however, nearly 400 km of narrow-gauge lines (762 mm) in various locations around the country.

Since the establishment of the state, all three North Korean leaders—Kim Il-sung, Kim Jong-il and Kim Jong-un—have been known to use high-security private trains as their preferred method of domestic and international travel.

Death and state funeral of Kim Jong-il Funeral In December 2011

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Pukbunaeryuk Line

The Pukbunaeryuk Line, also called the Hyesan–Manp'o Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line after the only completed stage of three planned stages, is an electrified standard-gauge secondary trunk line of the Korean State Railway in Chagang and Ryanggang Provinces, North Korea, connecting the Manp'o Line at Manp'o to the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line at Hyesan. It also connects to the China Railway Meiji Railway via the Ji'an Yalu River Border Railway Bridge between Manp'o and Meihekou, China.

Paektusan Chongnyon Line

The Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary mainline of the Korean State Railway running from Kilju on the P'yŏngra Line to Hyesan on the Pukbunaeryuk Line; it connects to the narrow gauge Paengmu Line at Paeg'am Ch'ŏngnyŏn Station, and to the Samjiyŏn Line at Wiyŏn Ch'ŏngnyŏn Station.

Paengmu Line

The Paengmu Line is a partially electrified narrow gauge line of the Korean State Railway running from Paeg'am on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line to Musan on the Musan Line, in the Ryanggang and North Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea.

Pochon Line

The Poch'ŏn Line, also known as Paektusan Rimch'ŏl Line, is a former partially electrified narrow gauge line of the Korean State Railway in Ryanggang Province, North Korea, running from Karim on the Samjiyŏn Line to Ryanggang Taep'yŏng.

Samjiyon Line

Samjiyŏn Line is the name of a railway line of the Korean State Railway in Ryanggang Province, North Korea, running from Wiyŏn on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line to Motka. The name is applied both to the original narrow gauge line built in 1948, as well as to the new standard gauge line opened in 2017.

Paegam Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is a railway station in Paegam-ŭp, Paegam county, Ryanggang province, North Korea, on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line of the Korean State Railway. The narrow-gauge Paengmu Line connects to the standard-gauge network here.

Wiyŏn Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is a railway station in Wiyŏn-dong, greater Hyesan city, Ryanggang province, North Korea, on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line of the Korean State Railway. It is also the starting point of the narrow-gauge Samjiyŏn line.

Jong-il Peak

Jong-il Peak is one of the peaks of Mount Sobaek, south-east of Paektu Mountain. The height is 5,899 ft (1,798 m). It is located near the shore of Sobaek Stream, in Samjiyon County, Ryanggang Province, North Korea.

Poch'ŏn Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is a railway station in Kasal-li, Poch'ŏn county, Ryanggang province, North Korea, on the Samjiyŏn of the Korean State Railway. It is also the starting point of the narrow-gauge Poch'ŏn line.

Ryanggang Taep'yŏng station, originally P'yŏngmul station, is a former railway station in Taep'yŏng-rodongjagu, Poch'ŏn county, Ryanggang province, North Korea, the terminus of the narrow-gauge Poch'ŏn line.

Unbong Line

The Unbong Line is a secondary railway line of the Korean State Railway located entirely within Unbong-rodongjagu, Chasŏng County, Chagang, North Korea, running from Sangp'unggang on the Pukbunaeryuk Line to Kuunbong.

The Samjiyon Band is a North Korean classical music ensemble.

Samji Lake

Samji (Korean: 삼지) is a lake in North Korea. The lake serves as a tourist attraction.

References

  1. 조선중앙통계국,2008년 인구 조사,2009년.
  2. Shin, Hyonhee (2 December 2019). "North Korea's Kim celebrates completion of 'modern mountainous city'". Reuters . Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  3. https://kcnawatch.org/newstream/1576133419-848809366/Samjiyon-County-Renamed-Samjiyon-City/
  4. "Samjiyon Railway Line". North Korean Economy Watch. Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  5. "혜산~삼지연 철길, 정치적 의도 내포". Radio Free Asia. Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  6. 1 2 3 4 http://www.dailynk.com/english/read.php?cataId=nk01300&num=2685
  7. Bärtås, Magnus; Ekman, Fredrik (2014). Hirviöidenkin on kuoltava: Ryhmämatka Pohjois-Koreaan[All Monsters Must Die: An Excursion to North Korea] (in Finnish). Translated by Eskelinen, Heikki. Helsinki: Tammi. p. 66. ISBN   978-951-31-7727-0.
  8. "30 years report of Meteorological Observations in North Korea" (in Korean). Korea Meteorological Administration. pp. 232–281. Archived from the original on 21 December 2020. Retrieved 21 December 2020.
  9. "Rink card of: Icestadion Samji Samjion (Samjiyŏn)". www.speedskatingnews.info. Retrieved 25 June 2018.