Samuel Hales

Last updated
Samuel Hale
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk [1]
In office
1656–1658
Preceded by Matthew Canfield
Succeeded by Richard Olmsted
In office
1660–1661
Preceded by Matthew Canfield
Succeeded by Matthew Canfield
Personal details
Born(1615-07-01)July 1, 1615
Hertford, England
DiedNovember 9, 1693(1693-11-09) (aged 78)
Wethersfield, Connecticut Colony
Resting placeGreen Cemetery, Glastonbury, Connecticut
Spouse(s)Mary Smith
ChildrenSamuel, Thomas, Dorothy
Residence Hartford, Connecticut Colony
Norwalk, Connecticut Colony
Wethersfield, Connecticut Colony
Military service
Battles/wars Pequot War

Samuel Hale (July 1, 1615 – November 9, 1693) was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of 1656, 1657 and 1660.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Hartford, Connecticut Capital of Connecticut

Hartford is the capital city of Connecticut. It was the seat of Hartford County until Connecticut disbanded county government in 1960. The city is nicknamed the "Insurance Capital of the World", as it hosts many insurance company headquarters and is the region's major industry. It is the core city in the Greater Hartford area of Connecticut. Census estimates since the 2010 United States Census have indicated that Hartford is the fourth-largest city in Connecticut, behind the coastal cities of Bridgeport, New Haven, and Stamford.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

He was born on July 1, 1615 in Hertford, England, the son of Thomas Hale (born 1590 Hertfordshire, England) and Joan Kirby Hale (born 1590, died 1640).

Hertford county town of Hertfordshire, England

Hertford is the county town of Hertfordshire, England, and is also a civil parish in the East Hertfordshire district of the county. The town has a population of approximately 26,000, according to the 2011 census.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

He was living in Hartford in 1639.

He was a selectman in Wethersfield in 1647.

He served in the Pequot War, with his brother Thomas Hale, for which he received a lot in the Soldiers' Field. [2]

Pequot War war

The Pequot War was an armed conflict that took place between 1636 and 1638 in New England between the Pequot tribe and an alliance of the colonists of the Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Saybrook colonies and their allies from the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes. The war concluded with the decisive defeat of the Pequots. At the end, about 700 Pequots had been killed or taken into captivity. Hundreds of prisoners were sold into slavery to the West Indies; other survivors were dispersed as captives to the victorious tribes.

He moved to Norwalk before 1655 [2] with his brother Thomas.

He served as a deputy in the General Court of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in 1656, 1657, 1658, and 1660. [1]

In 1660, he moved back to Wethersfield. [2]

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founders of Hartford in the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford, and he is also listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founders of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

History of Hartford, Connecticut

The History of Hartford, Connecticut has occupied a central place in Connecticut's history from the state's origins to the present, as well as the greater history of the United States of America.

First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground church building in Connecticut, United States of America

The First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground is a historic church and cemetery at 60 Gold Street in Hartford, Connecticut. It is the oldest church congregation in Hartford, founded in 1636 by Thomas Hooker. The present building, the congregation's fourth, was built in 1807, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The adjacent cemetery, formally set apart in 1640, was the city's sole cemetery until 1803.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

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References

Preceded by
Matthew Canfield
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

1656–1658
Succeeded by
Richard Olmsted
Preceded by
Matthew Canfield
Deputy of the
General Court
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

1660–1661
Succeeded by
Matthew Canfield