Samuel L. Casey

Last updated
Samuel L. Casey
Member of U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 1st district
In office
March 10, 1862 March 4, 1863
Preceded by Henry C. Burnett
Succeeded by Lucien Anderson
8th Treasurer of the United States
In office
April 4, 1853 December 22, 1859
President Franklin Pierce
James Buchanan
Preceded by John Sloane
Succeeded by William C. Price
Member of the Kentucky House of Representatives
In office
1860-1862
Personal details
BornSamuel Lewis Casey
(1821-02-12)February 12, 1821
near Caseyville, Kentucky, U.S.
Died August 25, 1902(1902-08-25) (aged 81)
Saint Joseph, Missouri, U.S.

Samuel Lewis Casey (February 12, 1821 – August 25, 1902) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. Born near Caseyville, Kentucky, Casey attended the country schools. [1] He engaged in mercantile pursuits. [1]

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

Kentucky State of the United States of America

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it, (because in Kentucky's first constitution, the name state was used) Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States.

Caseyville, Kentucky Unincorporated community in Kentucky, United States

Caseyville is an unincorporated community in Union County, Kentucky, United States. Caseyville is located on the Ohio River and Kentucky Route 1508, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west of Sturgis.

In 1853, President of the United States Franklin Pierce nominated Casey to be Treasurer of the United States. Casey held this office from April 4, 1853 to December 22, 1859. [2] He served as member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1860 to 1862. [1]

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

The President of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Franklin Pierce 14th President of the United States

Franklin Pierce was the 14th president of the United States (1853–1857), a northern Democrat who saw the abolitionist movement as a fundamental threat to the unity of the nation. He alienated anti-slavery groups by championing and signing the Kansas–Nebraska Act and enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act, yet he failed to stem conflict between North and South, setting the stage for Southern secession and the American Civil War.

Treasurer of the United States office in the United States Department of the Treasury

The Treasurer of the United States is an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been taken over by different bureaus of the Department. Responsibility for oversight of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the United States Mint, and the United States Savings Bonds Division was assigned to the Treasurer in 1981. As of 2002 the Office of the Treasurer underwent a major reorganization. The Treasurer now advises the Director of the Mint, the Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the Deputy Secretary and the Secretary of the Treasury on matters relating to coinage, currency and the production of other instruments by the United States.

Casey was elected as a Unionist to the 37th United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the expulsion of Henry C. Burnett and served as representative of Kentucky's 1st congressional district from March 10, 1862, to March 4, 1863. [1]

The Unionist Party, later re-named Unconditional Unionist Party, was a political party in the United States started after the Compromise of 1850 to define politicians who supported the Compromise. Members included Southern Democrats who were loyal to the Union as well as elements of the old Whig Party and other factions opposed to a separate Southern Confederacy.

37th United States Congress

The Thirty-seventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1861, to March 4, 1863, during the first two years of Abraham Lincoln's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventh Census of the United States in 1850. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

Henry Cornelius Burnett American politician

Henry Cornelius Burnett was an American politician who served as a Confederate States Senator from Kentucky from 1862 to 1865. From 1855 to 1861, Burnett served four terms in the United States House of Representatives. A lawyer by profession, Burnett had held only one public office—circuit court clerk—before being elected to Congress. He represented Kentucky's 1st congressional district immediately prior to the Civil War. This district contained the entire Jackson Purchase region of the state, which was more sympathetic to the Confederate cause than any other area of Kentucky. Burnett promised the voters of his district that he would have President Abraham Lincoln arraigned for treason. Unionist newspaper editor George D. Prentice described Burnett as "a big, burly, loud-mouthed fellow who is forever raising points of order and objections, to embarrass the Republicans in the House".

Casey then retired from active business pursuits. [1] He died in Saint Joseph, Missouri on August 25, 1902. [1] He was cremated and his ashes interred in Caseyville Cemetery, Caseyville, Kentucky.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Biography from Congressional website". Bioguide.congress.gov. 1902-08-25. Retrieved 2011-12-05.
  2. "Family Tree Maker". Familytreemaker.genealogy.com. Retrieved 2011-12-05.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

Government offices
Preceded by
John Sloane
Treasurer of the United States
April 4, 1853 – December 22, 1859
Succeeded by
William C. Price
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Henry C. Burnett
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 1st congressional district

1862–1863
Succeeded by
Lucien Anderson

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .