Samuel Maclay

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United States Congress. "Samuel Maclay (id: M000029)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress .
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  • Samuel Maclay
    United States Senator
    from Pennsylvania
    In office
    March 4, 1803 January 4, 1809
    U.S. House of Representatives
    Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
    from Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district

    17951797
    alongside: David Bard
    Succeeded by
    U.S. Senate
    Preceded by U.S. senator (Class 1) from Pennsylvania
    18031809
    Served alongside: George Logan, Andrew Gregg
    Succeeded by

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    Senator Maclay may refer to: