Samuel Shepheard (died 1748)

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Samuel Shepheard (1677–1748), of Exning, Suffolk, near Newmarket, Cambridgeshire, was an English Tory politician who sat in the English House of Commons in 1701 and in the British House of Commons almost continually for forty years from 1708 to 1748.

Exning village in United Kingdom

Exning is a village in Suffolk, England.

Suffolk County of England

Suffolk is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.

Newmarket, Suffolk Market town in Suffolk, England

Newmarket is a market town in the English county of Suffolk, approximately 65 miles north of London. It is generally considered the birthplace and global centre of thoroughbred horse racing and a potential World Heritage Site. It is a major local business cluster, with annual investment rivalling that of the Cambridge Science Park, the other major cluster in the region. It is the largest racehorse training centre in Britain, the largest racehorse breeding centre in the country, home to most major British horseracing institutions, and a key global centre for horse health. Two Classic races, and an additional three British Champions Series races are held at Newmarket every year. The town has had close royal connections since the time of James I, who built a palace there, and was also a base for Charles I, Charles II, and most monarchs since. The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, visits the town often to see her horses in training.

Shepheard was the second surviving son of Samuel Shepheard and his wife Mary Chamberlayne, daughter of Edward Chamberlayne of Princethorpe, Warwickshire. He was a director of the East India Company from 1717 to 1720. When his unmarried elder brother Francis died in 1739, he inherited his estate, [1] including Exning House. [2]

East India Company 16th through 19th-century British trading company

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company, was an English and later British joint-stock company. It was formed to trade in the Indian Ocean region, initially with Mughal India and the East Indies, and later with Qing China. The company ended up seizing control over large parts of the Indian subcontinent, colonised parts of Southeast Asia, and colonised Hong Kong after a war with Qing China.

Shepheard was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Malmesbury at the first general election in 1701 but did not stand again at the second. At the 1708 general election he was elected MP for Cambridge. His election was declared void on 9 February 1710 but he won the re-election on 22 February. He was returned unopposed in the general elections of 1710 and 1713. [1] At the 1715 general election he was initially defeated, but was seated on petition on 27 May 1715. He did not stand at Cambridge in 1722, but instead was elected MP for Cambridgeshire at a by-election on 19 November 1724. He was elected again at the 1727 general election with his former ward Henry Bromley, and was returned unopposed in 1734 and 1741. At the 1747 general election he was returned again as MP for Cambridge. [3]

Malmesbury was a parliamentary borough in Wiltshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1275 until 1832, and then one member from 1832 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

1708 British general election

The 1708 British general election was the first general election to be held after the Acts of Union had united the Parliaments of England and Scotland.

Cambridge (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Cambridge is a parliamentary constituency created in 1295 represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament.

Shepheard died of an apoplectic stroke at Hampton Court on his way back from Bath on 24 April 1748. [3] He never married but left an illegitimate daughter Frances who inherited his estate and married Charles Ingram, 9th Viscount of Irvine in 1758.

Charles Ingram, 9th Viscount of Irvine Scottish Viscount

Charles Ingram, 9th Viscount of Irvine, known as Charles Ingram until 1763, was a British landowner, politician and courtier. He succeeded his uncle to the Viscountcy and the Temple Newsam estate in Leeds in 1763.

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References

  1. 1 2 "SHEPHEARD, Samuel II (1677-1748), of London, and Exning, Suff". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  2. House and Heritage – Exning House
  3. 1 2 "SHEPHEARD, Samuel II (1677-1748), of London, and Exning, Suff". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 18 August 2018.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Michael Wicks
Edward Pauncefort
Member of Parliament for Malmesbury
1701
With: Edward Pauncefort
Succeeded by
Sir Charles Hedges
Edward Pauncefort
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Anthony Thompson
Sir John Cotton, Bt
Member of Parliament for Cambridge
17081715
With: Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Thomas Sclater
Preceded by
Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Thomas Sclater
Member of Parliament for Cambridge
1715–1722
With: Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Thomas Bacon
Preceded by
Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt
Lord Harley
Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire
1724–1747
With: Sir John Hynde Cotton, Bt 1724-1727
Henry Bromley 1727-1741
Soame Jenyns 1741-1747
Succeeded by
Soame Jenyns
Viscount Royston
Preceded by
Viscount Dupplin
Christopher Jeaffreson
Member of Parliament for Cambridge
1747–1748
With: Viscount Dupplin
Succeeded by
Viscount Dupplin
Christopher Jeaffreson