Samuel Smith (Connecticut politician)

Last updated
Samuel Smith
Deputy of the
General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk [1]
In office
May 1691 October 1691
Servingwith Andrew Messenger
Preceded by Christopher Comstock, Thomas Seamer
Succeeded by John Belding, James Olmsted
Personal details
Bornca. 1646
Diedca. 1735
New Canaan, Connecticut Colony
Resting place East Norwalk Historical Cemetery, Norwalk, Connecticut
Spouse(s)Rachael Marvin, daughter of Matthew Marvin, Sr. (m. 1670) [2]
ChildrenRachel Smith Benedict, Sarah Smith, Lydia Smith Lockwood (m. James Lockwood), Hannah Smith, Nehemiah Smith, Ruth Smith, Samuel Smith, Jr. [2]
Residence Norwalk, Connecticut Colony

Samuel Smith (ca. 1646 – ca. 1735) was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1691 session.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk lies within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Connecticut U.S. state in the United States

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Due to the commonality of the name, and conflicting records, it is difficult to determine the exact origins of Samuel Smith. He was, perhaps, the son of Captain William Smith, a magistrate in Weymouth, Massachusetts Bay Colony. He moved to Norwalk as a young man, and he listed among its earliest settlers. [3] His father-in-law, Matthew Marvin, Sr. gave Smith half of his home lot and orchard. [3]

Weymouth, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Weymouth is a city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, one of 13 Massachusetts municipalities with city forms of government while retaining "town of" in their official names. It is named after Weymouth, Dorset, a coastal town in England, and is the second-oldest settlement in Massachusetts. It is one of the South Shore's more affordable towns and offers a short commute into Boston, MBTA bus and rail service, and a town beach.

Massachusetts Bay Colony English possession in North America between 1628 and 1684

The Massachusetts Bay Colony was an English settlement on the east coast of America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the Province of Massachusetts Bay. The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land about 15.4 miles (24.8 km) apart—the areas around Salem and Boston.

In 1672, he owned "a parcel of land in Indian Field," not far from the Norwalk-Westport boundary.

He was named a freeman in 1674. In 1679, he served as town treasurer. He was on a committee, along with Matthew Marvin, Sr., and John Bowton to obtain a minister for the settlement, which appointed Reverend Thomas Hanford. He served as a deputy of the Connecticut General Court in 1691. He was a townsman in 1698, 1702, 1706, and 1712. In 1702, he was selectman.

During the American colonial period, a freeman was a person who was not a slave. The term originated in 12th-century Europe.

John Bowton was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1671, October 1673, May 1674, May 1675, October 1676, May and October 1677, May 1678, October 1679, May 1680, May 1681, May and October 1682. May 1683, and May and October 1685.

Thomas Hanford was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the first minister in Norwalk, and continued in charge of the settlement's church for forty-one years, until his death in 1693. In addition to his spiritual leadership, he also served as the civic leader and school teacher of the settlement.

In 1680 or 1681 he owned a home-lot of four acres adjacent to Strawberry Hill.


Related Research Articles

Richard Olmsted was a founding settler of both Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served in the General Court of the Connecticut Colony in the sessions of May 1653, October 1654, May 1658, October 1660, May 1662, May and October 1663, May and October 1664, October 1665, May and October 1666, May 1667, May and October 1668, May 1669, May 1671, and May 1679.

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W.

Matthew Canfield was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut and Newark, New Jersey. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the sessions of May 1654, May 1655, May 1656, May 1657, May 1658, May 1659, May 1660, May 1661, May and October 1662, October 1663, May and October 1664, May and October 1665, and May and October 1666.

Matthew Marvin Sr. was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1654 session. He served as a magistrate in 1659.

Samuel Hale was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of 1656, 1657 and 1660.

Isaac Moore was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in the October 1657 session.

Nathaniel Richards (1604–1681) was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in October 1658.

Walter Hoyt was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk between 1658 and 1662, and, when it was renamed, as a deputy of the Connecticut General Assembly between 1662 and 1681. He was a Norwalk selectman in 1672.

Christopher Comstock was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1686, May 1689, and May 1690.

Matthew Marvin may refer to:

Matthew Marvin Jr. was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1694, and May and October 1697.

Jonathan Marsh (1621–1672) was a founding settler of the New Haven Colony, and of Norwalk, Connecticut. He came to Norwalk from New Haven sometime prior to March 1656. He was the settlement's miller.

Matthias Sention Sr. was a founding settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts, of Windsor, Connecticut, of Wethersfield, Connecticut and of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Thomas Seamer was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Assembly of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk in the May 1690 session.

John Belding was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a member of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1691 and May 1705.

James Olmsted was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1691, October 1692, October 1693, and May 1699.

Andrew Messenger was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1691, and October 1696, and a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives in the sessions of October 1700, October 1701, and May 1702.

Matthew Seymour was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1712, and October 1713. He was one of the founding settlers of Ridgefield, Connecticut.

Samuel Marvin (1664–1754) was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk, Connecticut Colony in the May 1718 session. He served as a townsman in 1702, 1707, 1710, 1712, 1714, 1717, 1724, and 1727.

John Marvin was a member of the House of Representatives of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1734, and May 1738.

References

Preceded by
Christopher Comstock
Thomas Seamer
Deputy of the
General Assembly
of the
Colony of Connecticut
from Norwalk

May 1691
With: Andrew Messenger
Succeeded by
John Belding
James Olmsted