San Bernardino County, California

Last updated

San Bernardino County, California
San Bernardino County Courthouse 2.jpg
Downtown San Bernardino.jpg
Calico view from lookout point.jpg
SanGorgonioWilderness DryLake.jpg
Flag of San Bernardino County, California.svg
Seal of San Bernardino County, California.svg
San Bernardino County, California
Interactive map of San Bernardino County
Map of California highlighting San Bernardino County.svg
Location in California
Country United States
State California
EstablishedApril 26, 1853 [1]
Named for The City of San Bernardino, in turn named for San Bernardino de Sena Estancia, in turn named for Saint Bernardino of Siena
County seat San Bernardino
Largest city (Pop.)San Bernardino
Largest city (Area) Apple Valley
Government
  Type Council–CEO
  BodyBoard of Supervisors [2] [3]
  ChairDawn Rowe (N.P.)
  Vice Chair Paul Cook (R)
  Board of Supervisors [4]
Supervisors
   Chief executive officer Luther Snoke
Area
  Total20,105 sq mi (52,070 km2)
  Land20,057 sq mi (51,950 km2)
  Water48 sq mi (120 km2)
Highest elevation
[5]
11,503 ft (3,506 m)
Population
 (2020) [6]
  Total2,181,654 Increase2.svg [7]
  Density110/sq mi (40/km2)
GDP
[8]
  Total$100.7 billion (2022)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific Time Zone)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area codes 442/760, 909, 951
FIPS code06-071
Congressional districts 23rd, 25th, 28th, 33rd, 35th, 40th
Website www.sbcounty.gov

San Bernardino County ( /sænˌbɜːrnəˈdn/ SANBUR-nə-DEE-noh), officially the County of San Bernardino, is a county located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of California, and is located within the Inland Empire area. As of the 2020 U.S. Census, the population was 2,181,654, [9] making it the fifth-most populous county in California and the 14th-most populous in the United States. The county seat is San Bernardino. [10]

Contents

While included within the Greater Los Angeles area, San Bernardino County is included in the Riverside–San Bernardino–Ontario metropolitan statistical area.

With an area of 20,105 square miles (52,070 km2), San Bernardino County is the largest county in the contiguous United States by area, although some of Alaska's boroughs and census areas are larger. The county is close to the size of West Virginia.

This vast county stretches from where the bulk of the county population resides in three Census County Divisions (Fontana, San Bernardino, and Victorville-Hesperia), counting 1,793,186 people as of the 2010 Census, covering 1,730 square miles (4,500 km2), across the thinly populated deserts and mountains. It spans an area from south of the San Bernardino Mountains in San Bernardino Valley, to the Nevada border and the Colorado River.

With a population that is 53.7% Hispanic as of 2020, it is California's most populous majority-Hispanic county and the second-largest nationwide. [11]

History

Indigenous

Many different Indigenous groups, including the Cahuilla, long inhabited what is now San Bernardino County. Captain of the Agua Caliente Band (1900). Captain of the Agua Caliente Indians, ca.1900 (CHS-3826).jpg
Many different Indigenous groups, including the Cahuilla, long inhabited what is now San Bernardino County. Captain of the Agua Caliente Band (1900).

The indigenous peoples that resided in what is now San Bernardino County were primarily the Taaqtam (Serrano) and ʔívil̃uqaletem (Cahuilla) peoples who lived in the San Bernardino Valley and the San Bernardino Mountains; the Chemehuevi and the Kawaiisu peoples who lived in the Mojave Desert region; and the 'Aha Makhav (Mohave) and the Piipaash (Maricopa) peoples who lived along the Colorado River. These groups established various villages and settlements throughout the region that were interconnected by a series of extensive trails. [12] [13] [14]

Wa'aachnga was a major Tongva village site, also occupied by the Serrano and Cahuilla, located near what is now the city of San Bernardino. The village was part of an extensive trade network along the Mohave Trail that connected villages in San Bernardino County from the Colorado River to the Los Angeles Basin. [15] [16] Wá'peat was a Desert Serrano village located near what is now the city of Hesperia. It was part of a series of villages located along the Mojave River. [17] By the late 1700s, villages in the area were being increasingly encroached upon by Spanish soldiers and missionaries, who were coming into the region from Mission San Gabriel. [18] [13]

Colonial period

Don Antonio Maria Lugo was granted the right to settle the San Bernardino Valley in 1839 by Governor Juan Bautista Alvarado. Antonio Maria Lugo.jpg
Don Antonio María Lugo was granted the right to settle the San Bernardino Valley in 1839 by Governor Juan Bautista Alvarado.

Spanish Missionaries from Mission San Gabriel Arcángel established a church at the village of Wa'aachnga, which would be renamed Politania in 1810. [13] Father Francisco Dumetz named the church San Bernardino on May 20, 1810, after the feast day of St. Bernardino of Siena. The Franciscans also gave the name San Bernardino to the snowcapped peak in Southern California, in honor of the saint and it is from him that the county derives its name. [19] In 1819, they established the San Bernardino de Sena Estancia, a mission farm in what is now Redlands.

Following Mexican independence from Spain in 1821, Mexican citizens were granted land grants to establish ranchos in the area of the county. Rancho Jurupa in 1838, Rancho Cucamonga and El Rincon in 1839, Rancho Santa Ana del Chino in 1841, Rancho San Bernardino in 1842 and Rancho Muscupiabe in 1844.

Agua Mansa was the first town in what became San Bernardino County, settled by immigrants from New Mexico on land donated from the Rancho Jurupa in 1841.

Establishment

San Bernardino County horticulture exhibit at World Columbian Exposition, Chicago 1893. World's Columbian Exposition- Horticultural Building, Chicago, United States, 1893..jpg
San Bernardino County horticulture exhibit at World Columbian Exposition, Chicago 1893.

Following the purchase of Rancho San Bernardino, and the establishment of the town of San Bernardino in 1851 by Mormon colonists, San Bernardino County was formed in 1853 from parts of Los Angeles County. Some of the southern parts of the county's territory were given to Riverside County in 1893.

In the 1980s, Northern San Bernardino County proposed to create Mojave County due to the abysmal service levels the county provided. Ultimately, the vote for county secession failed. The proposed county was from the Cajon Pass to the city of Needles. [20]

In 1998, County administrator James Hlawek resigned after being subject to an FBI investigation for bribery, but only after Harry Mays, county Treasurer-Tax Collector Thomas O'Donnell, County Investment Officer Sol Levin and three businessmen had agreed to plead guilty to federal bribery charges. [21] [22]

In 2004, County Supervisor Geral Eaves Pleaded guilty to bribery for accepting gifts from businesses for allowing billboards on county land. [23]

From 2004 to 2016, the county was embroiled in a corruption scandal over the Colonies housing development in Upland with real estate developer Jeff Burum. The scandal resulted in $102 million being paid to Burum's real estate company. Supervisor Bill Postmus pleaded guilty to 10 felonies in regard to his previous post as county assessor. In 2020, Burum sued the county again and the county reached for a $69 million settlement. 2022, the county's insurance company, Ironside, balked at paying the settlement, claiming that the county willfully "retaliate[d] against the Colonies II Plaintiffs as part of a decades-long dispute over land and water rights in Upland, California, culminating in a malicious prosecution of Burum." [24] [25] [26] [27] [28]

In 2020, voters approved Measure K, which limited county supervisors to one term instead of three, while reducing pay from 250 thousand dollars to 60 thousand dollars. County Supervisors appealed the decision, only to lose in the state's appeals court. [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] By 2022, term limits were restored and pay was restored to 80% of the annual base compensation for San Bernardino Superior Court judges under a supervisor lead ballot measure [34] [35] [36]

In 2022, The Board of supervisors were pushed by a major supervisor campaign contributor Jeff Burum to vote for secession from the State of California to form the state of Empire. [37] [38] [39] [40] [41]

Geography

Arrowhead, San Bernardino Mountains.jpg
The Arrowhead natural feature is the source of many local names and icons, such as Lake Arrowhead and the county's seal.
JTCA 20140905.jpg
Central Joshua Tree with the mountains of Joshua Tree National Park on the horizon.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 20,105 square miles (52,070 km2), of which 20,057 square miles (51,950 km2) is land and 48 square miles (120 km2) (0.2%) is water. [42] It is the largest county by area in California and the largest in the United States (excluding boroughs in Alaska). [43] It is slightly larger than the states of New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware and Rhode Island combined, and is also slightly larger than Switzerland. It borders both Nevada and Arizona.

The bulk of the population, nearly two million, live in the roughly 480 square miles south of the San Bernardino Mountains adjacent to Riverside and in the San Bernardino Valley in the southwestern portion of the county. About 390,000 residents live just north of the San Bernardino Mountains, in and around the roughly 280 square-mile area that includes the Victor Valley. Roughly another 100,000 people live scattered across the rest of the sprawling county.

The Mojave National Preserve covers some of the eastern desert, especially between Interstate 15 and Interstate 40. The desert portion also includes the cities of Needles next to the Colorado River and Barstow at the junction of Interstate 15 and Interstate 40. Trona is at the northwestern part of the county, west of Death Valley. This national park, mostly within Inyo County, also has a small portion of land within San Bernardino County. The largest metropolitan area in the Mojave Desert part of the county is the Victor Valley, with the incorporated localities of Adelanto, Apple Valley, Hesperia, and Victorville. Further south, a portion of Joshua Tree National Park overlaps the county near the High Desert area, in the vicinity of Twentynine Palms. The remaining towns make up the remainder of the High Desert: Pioneertown, Yucca Valley, Joshua Tree, Landers, and Morongo Valley.

The mountains are home to the San Bernardino National Forest, and include the communities of Crestline, Lake Arrowhead, Running Springs, Big Bear City, Forest Falls, and Big Bear Lake.

The San Bernardino Valley is at the eastern end of the San Gabriel Valley. The San Bernardino Valley includes the cities of Ontario, Chino, Chino Hills, Upland, Fontana, Rialto, Colton, Grand Terrace, Montclair, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino, Loma Linda, Highland, Redlands, and Yucaipa.

Adjacent counties

Counties adjacent to San Bernardino County, California
As shown by the map on the left, San Bernardino County is bordered on the north by Inyo County; on the northeast by Clark County, Nevada; on the east by Mohave County, Arizona; on the southeast by La Paz County, Arizona; on the south by Riverside County; on the southwest by Orange County; on the west by Los Angeles County; and on the northwest by Kern County.

National protected areas

Cadiz Dunes Wilderness Cadiz Dunes Wilderness.jpg
Cadiz Dunes Wilderness

More than 80% of the county's land is owned by the federal government. [44] There are at least 35 official wilderness areas in the county that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. This is the largest number of any county in the United States (although not the largest in total area). The majority are managed by the Bureau of Land Management, but some are integral components of the above listed national protected areas. Most of these wilderness areas lie entirely within the county, but a few are shared with neighboring counties (and two of these are shared with the neighboring states of Arizona and Nevada).

Except as noted, these wilderness areas are managed solely by the Bureau of Land Management and lie within San Bernardino County:

Demographics

2020

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1860 5,551
1870 3,988−28.2%
1880 7,78695.2%
1890 25,497227.5%
1900 27,9299.5%
1910 56,706103.0%
1920 73,40129.4%
1930 133,90082.4%
1940 161,10820.3%
1950 281,64274.8%
1960 503,59178.8%
1970 684,07235.8%
1980 895,01630.8%
1990 1,418,38058.5%
2000 1,709,43420.5%
2010 2,035,21019.1%
2020 2,181,6547.2%
2023 (est.)2,195,611 [45] 0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [46]
1790–1960 [47] 1900–1990 [48]
1990–2000 [49] 2010 [50] 2020 [51]
San Bernardino County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [50] Pop 2020 [51] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)677,598566,11333.29%25.95%
Black or African American alone (NH)170,700173,3228.39%7.94%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)8,5238,4120.42%0.39%
Asian alone (NH)123,978176,2046.09%8.08%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)5,8456,1730.29%0.28%
Other race alone (NH)4,05512,1170.20%0.56%
Mixed race or Multiracial (NH)43,36668,4002.13%3.14%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)1,001,1451,170,91349.19%53.67%
Total2,035,2102,181,654100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

Ethnic origins in San Bernardino County Ethnic Origins in San Bernardino County, CA.png
Ethnic origins in San Bernardino County

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census reported that San Bernardino County had a population of 2,035,210. The racial makeup of San Bernardino County was 1,153,161 (56.7%) White, 181,862 (8.9%) African American, 22,689 (1.1%) Native American, 128,603 (6.3%) Asian, 6,870 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 439,661 (21.6%) from other races, and 102,364 (5.0%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,001,145 persons (49.2%). [59]

2000

As of the census [60] of 2000, there were 1,709,434 people, 528,594 households, and 404,374 families residing in the county. The population density was 85 inhabitants per square mile (33/km2). There were 601,369 housing units at an average density of 30 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 58.9% White, 9.1% African American, 1.2% Native American, 4.7% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 20.8% from other races, and 5.0% from two or more races. 39.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 8.3% were of German, 5.5% English and 5.1% Irish ancestry. 66.1% spoke English, 27.7% Spanish and 1.1% Tagalog as their first language.

There were 528,594 households, out of which 43.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 14.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.5% were non-families. 18.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.6% had someone 65 years of age or older living alone. The average household size was 3.2 people, and the average family size was 3.6 people.

The number of homeless in San Bernardino County grew from 5,270 in 2002 to 7,331 in 2007, a 39% increase. [61]

In the county, the population was spread out—with 32.3% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,066, and the median income for a family was $46,574. Males had a median income of $37,025 versus $27,993 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,856. About 12.6% of families and 15.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government and policing

County government

As of 2021, the Board of Supervisors oversees a $7.9 billion annual budget [62] and 25,430 employees.

The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors has 5 members elected from their districts: [63]

Other County of San Bernardino Elected Officials [64]

State and federal representation

In the United States House of Representatives, San Bernardino County is split among 6 congressional districts: [68]

In the California State Assembly, San Bernardino County is split among 10 assembly districts: [69]

In the California State Senate, San Bernardino County is split among 7 districts: [70]

Safety

Fire

Department logo San Bernardino County Fire Department Logo.png
Department logo

The San Bernardino County Fire Protection District (SBCoFD) or the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District provides fire protection and emergency medical services to the unincorporated parts of the county and 24 incorporated cities. [71] [72] The department annexed the Crest Forest Fire Protection District on July 1, 2015; [73] [74] [75] the San Bernardino City and Twentynine Palms Fire Departments on July 1, 2016; [76] [77] [78] [79] and the Upland Fire Department in July 2017. [80] As of April 2019 the City of Victorville declined to renew their contract with The San Bernardino County Fire Department. [81]

Sheriff

The San Bernardino County Sheriff provides court protection, jail administration, and coroner services for all of San Bernardino County. It provides police patrol, detective, and marshal services for the unincorporated areas of the county.

Municipal police

Municipal police departments in the county are: Fontana, San Bernardino, Rialto, Ontario, Upland, Montclair, Chino, Redlands, Colton, and Barstow. The San Bernardino County Sheriff provides contract law enforcement services to 14 incorporated cities and towns: Adelanto, Apple Valley, Big Bear, Chino Hills, Grand Terrace, Hesperia, Highland, Loma Linda, Needles, Rancho Cucamonga, Twentynine Palms, Victorville, Yucaipa, and Yucca Valley. Also for the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. The Sheriff's Commanders assigned to these stations acts as each municipality's Chief of Police.[ citation needed ]

Politics

Voter registration

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

San Bernardino County is a county in which candidates from both major political parties have won in recent elections. Democrat Hillary Clinton carried the county by a majority and by double digits in 2016. The Democratic Party also carried the county in 2008 and 2012, when Barack Obama won majorities of the county's votes, and in 1992 and 1996, when Bill Clinton won pluralities. Republican George W. Bush took the county in 2000 by a plurality and in 2004 by a majority. The county is split between heavily Latino, middle-class, and Democratic areas and more wealthy conservative areas. The heavily Latino cities of Ontario and San Bernardino went for John Kerry in 2004, but with a relatively low voter turnout. In 2006, San Bernardino's population exceeded 201,000, and in 2004, only 42,520 votes were cast in the city; in 2006, strongly Republican Rancho Cucamonga had over 145,000 residents, of whom 53,054 voted.

According to the California Secretary of State, as of February 2020, there were 1,016,190 registered voters in San Bernardino County. Of those, 410,197 (40.37%) were registered Democrats, 298,234 (29.35%) were registered Republicans, with the remainder belonging to minor political parties or declining to state. [83]

On November 4, 2008, San Bernardino County voted 67% for Proposition 8, which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages. [84]

Public safety

Law enforcement

SBC Sheriff's department operates a sizable fleet of helicopters. Shown here are a Bell 212 (foreground) and a Sikorsky S-61 at the air unit's Rialto Airport headquarters. Sbcsd-040422-03cr.jpg
SBC Sheriff's department operates a sizable fleet of helicopters. Shown here are a Bell 212 (foreground) and a Sikorsky S-61 at the air unit's Rialto Airport headquarters.

The current district attorney is Jason Anderson, who was elected in March 2018 and took office on January 1, 2019.

The county's primary law enforcement agency is the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. The department provides law enforcement services in the unincorporated areas of the county and in 14 contract cities, operates the county jail system, provides marshal services in the county superior courts, and has numerous other divisions to serve the residents of the county.

Fire rescue

The county operates the San Bernardino County Consolidated Fire District (commonly known as the San Bernardino County Fire Department). The department provides "all-risk" fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to all unincorporated areas in the county except for several areas served by independent fire protection districts, and several cities that chose to contract with the department.

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

On December 2, 2015, in the city of San Bernardino, terrorists attacked a staff meeting being held in the Inland Regional Center, murdering 14 people and wounding 22.

Cities by population and crime rates

Education

Colleges and universities

K-12 education

School districts are: [87]

Unified:

Secondary:

Elementary:

Libraries

The San Bernardino County Library System consists of 32 branches across the county. [88] Library services offered vary from branch to branch, but include internet access, children's story times, adult literacy services, book clubs, classes, and special events. [89] The library system also offers e-books, digital music and movie downloads, free access to online learning through Lynda.com, and many other digital services. [90]

City-sponsored public libraries also exist in San Bernardino County, including A. K. Smiley Public Library in Redlands, California, which was built in 1898. [91] Other public libraries in the County include: The San Bernardino City Public Library System, Rancho Cucamonga Public Library, Upland Public Library, Colton City Library, Victorville City Library [92] and the Ontario City Library. [93] These libraries are separate from the county system and do not share circulation privileges.

Arts and culture

Keys Desert Queen Ranch, in Joshua Tree National Park, has ranger-led tours to learn about the cultural history of Keys Ranch, Native American history, mining, ranching, homesteading, the Keys family, and the site's transition into a protected historical site. [94]

Kimberly Crest House & Gardens is a 6-acre estate in Redlands, CA with a Victorian Chateau and Italian Renaissance styled gardens. The gardens are open to the public and the house serves as a museum offering guided tours. [95]

The San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands CA is a multidisciplinary museum offering a look at the area’s past with an Inland Southern California regional focus. Its exhibits and collections draw from the cultural and natural history of San Bernardino County. [96]

The Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art at Chaffey College, Rancho Cucamonga, CA is a non-collecting institution that features temporary exhibitions of contemporary art, education and community programming. [97]

Transportation

Major highways

Public transportation

Airports

Environmental quality

California Attorney General Jerry Brown sued the county in April 2007 under the state's environmental quality act for failing to account for the impact of global warming in the county's 25-year growth plan, approved in March. The Center for Biological Diversity, the Sierra Club and the Audubon Society also sued in a separate case. According to Brendan Cummings, a senior attorney for the plaintiffs: "San Bernardino has never seen a project it didn't like. They rubber-stamp development. It's very much of a frontier mentality." The plaintiffs want the county to rewrite its growth plan's environmental impact statement to include methods to measure greenhouse gases and take steps to reduce them. [99]

According to county spokesman David Wert, only 15% of the county is controlled by the county[ clarification needed ]; the rest is cities and federal and state land. However, the county says it will make sure employment centers and housing are near transportation corridors to reduce traffic and do more to promote compact development and mass transit. The county budgeted $325,000 to fight the lawsuit. [99]

The state and the county reached a settlement in August 2007. [100] The county agreed to amend its general plan to include a Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan, including an emission inventory and reduction targets. According to the LA Times in 2015, San Bernardino County had the highest levels of ozone in the United States, averaging 102 parts per billion. [101]

Communities

Cities

CityYear
incorporated
Population,
2018 [102]
Median income,
2019 [103]
Land area
sq mi (km2)
Adelanto 197034,160$45,38056.009 (145.062)
Apple Valley 198873,508$51,31473.193 (189.57)
Barstow 194723,972$40,63341.385 (107.186)
Big Bear Lake 19815,281$51,0606.346 (16.435)
Chino 191091,583$87,09029.639 (76.766)
Chino Hills 199183,447$103,47344.681 (115.723)
Colton 188754,741$53,83815.324 (39.689)
Fontana 1952213,739$80,80042.432 (109.899)
Grand Terrace 197812,584$71,7883.502 (9.07)
Hesperia 198895,274$50,27173.096 (189.316)
Highland 198755,406$64,86818.755 (48.575)
Loma Linda 197024,382$55,6077.516 (19.467)
Montclair 195639,437$62,0245.517 (14.289)
Needles 19134,982$33,71730.808 (79.793)
Ontario 1891181,107$75,26649.941 (129.345)
Rancho Cucamonga 1977177,751$92,77339.851 (103.212)
Redlands 188871,586$72,41036.126 (93.565)
Rialto 1911103,440$70,18822.351 (57.889)
San Bernardino 1854215,941$49,72159.201 (153.33)
Twentynine Palms 198726,418$44,22659.143 (153.179)
Upland 190677,000$82,42615.617 (40.448)
Victorville 1962122,312$60,39173.178 (189.529)
Yucaipa 198953,682$69,10427.888 (72.231)
Yucca Valley 199121,726$44,75740.015 (103.639)

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Indian reservations

Ghost towns

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of San Bernardino County. [104]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2020 Census)
1 San Bernardino City222,101
2 Fontana City208,393
3 Ontario City175,265
4 Rancho Cucamonga City174,453
5 Victorville City134,810
6 Rialto City104,026
7 Hesperia City99,818
8 Chino City91,403
9 Upland City79,040
10 Chino Hills City78,411
11 Apple Valley Town75,791
12 Redlands City73,168
13 Highland City56,999
14 Yucaipa City54,542
15 Colton City53,909
16 Adelanto City38,046
17 Montclair City37,865
18 Twentynine Palms City28,065
19 Barstow City25,415
20 Loma Linda City24,791
21 Bloomington CDP24,339
22 Yucca Valley Town21,738
23 Phelan CDP13,859
24 Grand Terrace City13,150
25 Big Bear City CDP12,738
26 Lake Arrowhead CDP12,401
27 Crestline CDP11,650
28 Muscoy CDP10,719
29 Spring Valley Lake CDP9,598
30 Mentone CDP9,557
31 Oak Hills CDP9,450
32 Fort Irwin CDP8,096
33 Piñon Hills CDP7,258
34 Joshua Tree CDP6,489
35 Silver Lakes CDP6,317
36 Lucerne Valley CDP5,331
37 Running Springs CDP5,268
38 Big Bear Lake City5,046
39 Needles City4,931
40 Wrightwood CDP4,720
41 Lenwood CDP3,623
42 Morongo Valley CDP3,514
43 San Antonio Heights CDP3,441
44 Mountain View Acres CDP3,337
45 Homestead Valley CDP2,789
46 Searles Valley CDP1,565
47 Colorado River Indian Reservation [105] AIAN 1,395
48 Big River CDP1,084
49 Lytle Creek CDP725
50 Oak Glen CDP602
51 Baker CDP442
52 Chemehuevi Reservation [106] AIAN464
53 Fort Mojave Indian Reservation [107] AIAN253
54 San Manuel Reservation [108] AIAN137
55 Bluewater CDP116
56 Twenty-Nine Palms Reservation [109] AIAN5

Places of interest

See also

Newspapers, past and present

Notes

  1. Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  2. Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. 1 2 Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  4. Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Inyo County, California</span> County in California, United States

Inyo County is a county in the eastern central part of the U.S. state of California, located between the Sierra Nevada and the state of Nevada. In the 2020 census, the population was 19,016. The county seat is Independence. Inyo County is on the east side of the Sierra Nevada and southeast of Yosemite National Park in Central California. It contains the Owens River Valley; it is flanked to the west by the Sierra Nevada and to the east by the White Mountains and the Inyo Mountains. With an area of 10,192 square miles (26,400 km2), Inyo is the second-largest county by area in California, after San Bernardino County. Almost one-half of that area is within Death Valley National Park. However, with a population density of 1.8 people per square mile, it also has the second-lowest population density in California, after Alpine County.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mohave County, Arizona</span> County in Arizona, United States

Mohave County is a county in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2020 census, its population was 213,267. The county seat is Kingman, and the largest city is Lake Havasu City. It is the fifth largest county in the United States.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Adelanto, California</span> Incorporated city in the state of California, United States

Adelanto is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. It is approximately 9 miles (14 km) northwest of Victorville in the Victor Valley area of the Mojave Desert, in the northern region of the Inland Empire. The population was 38,046 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Apple Valley, California</span> City in California, United States

Apple Valley is an incorporated town in the Victor Valley of San Bernardino County, in the U.S. state of California. Its population was 75,791 as of the 2020 United States Census. The town is east of and adjoining to the neighboring cities of Victorville and Hesperia, 35 miles (56 km) south of Barstow, and 49 miles (79 km) north of San Bernardino through the Cajon Pass. It was incorporated on November 14, 1988, and is one of the 22 incorporated municipalities in California that use "town" in their names instead of "city".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hesperia, California</span> City in California, United States

Hesperia is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. It is located 35 miles (56 km) north of downtown San Bernardino in Victor Valley and surrounded by the Mojave Desert. Because of its relatively high elevation and the unique and moderate weather patterns of the region, Hesperia is part of what is locally called the High Desert. The name "Hesperia" means "western land". The 2019 census report estimates that the city has a population of 95,750.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Rancho Cucamonga, California</span> City in California, United States

Rancho Cucamonga is a city located just south of the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains and Angeles National Forest in San Bernardino County, California, United States. About 37 mi (60 km) east of Downtown Los Angeles, Rancho Cucamonga is the 28th most populous city in California. The city's seal, which centers on a cluster of grapes, alludes to the city's agricultural history including wine-making. The city's proximity to major transportation hubs, airports, and highways has attracted the business of several large corporations, including Coca-Cola, Frito-Lay, Big Lots, Mercury Insurance Group, Southern California Edison, and Amphastar Pharmaceuticals.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Victorville, California</span> City in California, United States

Victorville is a city in Victor Valley in San Bernardino County, California. Its population as of the 2020 census was 134,810.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yucaipa, California</span> City in California, United States

Yucaipa is a city located 10 miles (16 km) east of San Bernardino, in San Bernardino County, California, United States. The population was 54,542 at the 2020 census, up from 51,367 at the 2010 census. Yucaipa has the distinction of being the longtime home to a large population of Serrano Native Americans.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Bernardino Mountains</span> Mountain range of the Transverse Ranges in California, United States

The San Bernardino Mountains are a high and rugged mountain range in Southern California in the United States. Situated north and northeast of San Bernardino and spanning two California counties, the range tops out at 11,503 feet (3,506 m) at San Gorgonio Mountain – the tallest peak in Southern California. The San Bernardinos form a significant region of wilderness and are popular for hiking and skiing.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Victor Valley</span> Arid valley in southern California, United States

The Victor Valley is a valley in the Mojave Desert and subregion of the Inland Empire, in San Bernardino County in Southern California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eastern California</span> Region of California in the United States

Eastern California is a region defined as either the strip to the east of the crest of the Sierra Nevada or as the easternmost counties of California.

Phelan is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in San Bernardino County, California, in the Victor Valley of the Mojave Desert, north of the San Gabriel Mountains. The population was 14,304 in the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lucerne Valley, California</span> Census-designated place in California, USA

Lucerne Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) and valley landform in the southern Mojave Desert, in western San Bernardino County, California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">California's 41st congressional district</span> U.S. House district for California

California's 41st congressional district is a congressional district in Riverside County, in the U.S. state of California. The district is currently represented by Republican Ken Calvert.

California's 23rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California. The district is represented in the 118th United States Congress by Jay Obernolte.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">High Desert (California)</span> Geographic area of southern California

High Desert is a vernacular region with non-discrete boundaries covering areas of the western Mojave Desert in Southern California. The region encompasses various terrain with elevations generally between 2,000 and 4,000 ft above sea level, and is located just north of the San Gabriel, San Bernardino, and Little San Bernardino Mountains.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department</span> Law enforcement agency in California, United States

The San Bernardino County Sheriff-Coroner's Department (SBSD) serves San Bernardino County, California, which is geographically the largest county in the continental United States and is headquartered in San Bernardino. SBSD provides law enforcement services to the unincorporated areas of the county and contract law enforcement services to 14 of the county's cities, including Rancho Cucamonga and Chino Hills, serving a total of 1,029,466 of the county's 2 million residents. The department also operates the county jail system, provides marshal services for the county superior courts, and has other specialized divisions to serve the citizens of San Bernardino County.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Riverside County, California</span> County in California, United States

Riverside County is a county located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 2,418,185, making it the fourth-most populous county in California and the 10th-most populous in the United States. The name was derived from the city of Riverside, which is the county seat.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Snowline Joint Unified School District</span> School district in California

The Snowline Joint Unified School District (SJUSD) is the school district for part of the Victor Valley in the Mojave Desert and northeastern San Gabriel Mountains, located within San Bernardino County, California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Bernardino County Transportation Authority</span> Planning and operating agency in California

The San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) is the successor to San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG). They are responsible for administering the Measure I half-cent tax which voters in San Bernardino County, California, passed most recently in 2004. The SBCTA conducts transportation planning, construction, and operation in San Bernardino County. The SBCTA is a joint powers authority comprising the entire county and its cities. Every city and county supervisor is provided one seat on the board, and it also includes a nonvoting member from the California Department of Transportation's (Caltrans) District 8.

References

  1. "San Bernardino County". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  2. "Janice Rutherford, Supervisor, District 2 from San Bernardino County, California".
  3. "Dawn Rowe, Supervisor, District 3 from San Bernardino County, California".
  4. "San Bernardino County - Board of Supervisors".
  5. "San Gorgonio Mountain". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved February 16, 2015.
  6. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 21, 2016. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  7. "Explore Census Data".
  8. "Gross Domestic Product by County and Metropolitan Area, 2022" (PDF). www.bea.gov. Bureau of Economic Analysis.
  9. "San Bernardino County, California". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  10. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  11. "P2:: Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino by Race". 2020 Census. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 10, 2021.
  12. Sutton, Mark Q.; Earle, David D. (2017). The Desert Serrano of the Mojave River (PDF). Pacific Coast Archaeological Society Quarterly. p. 8.
  13. 1 2 3 Crafts, E. P. R. (1906). Pioneer Days in the San Bernardino Valley. Redlands, California: Kingsley, Moles & Collins Co. pp. 12–13. ISBN   9783849680169.
  14. Zappia, Natale A. (2014). Traders and raiders : the indigenous world of the Colorado Basin, 1540-1859. Chapel Hill. p. 77. ISBN   978-1-4696-1585-1. OCLC   883632043.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  15. Zappia, Natale A. (2014). Traders and raiders : the indigenous world of the Colorado Basin, 1540-1859. Chapel Hill. p. 77. ISBN   978-1-4696-1585-1. OCLC   883632043.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  16. Hernandez, Kelly Lytle (2017). City of inmates : conquest, rebellion, and the rise of human caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965. Chapel Hill. p. 18. ISBN   978-1-4696-3119-6. OCLC   974947592.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link)
  17. Sutton, Mark Q.; Earle, David D. (2017). The Desert Serrano of the Mojave River (PDF). Pacific Coast Archaeological Society Quarterly. p. 8.
  18. Sutton, Mark Q.; Earle, David D. (2017). The Desert Serrano of the Mojave River (PDF). Pacific Coast Archaeological Society Quarterly. p. 8.
  19. Van de Grift Sanchez, Nellie (1914). Spanish and Indian place names of California: their meaning and their romance. A.M. Robertson. p.  74 . Retrieved June 25, 2017.
  20. "Needles/Havasu Lake Service Reviews" (PDF). San Bernardino County LAFCO. San Bernardino County. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  21. "The Hlawek Era: County's top manager exposes web of corruption". Daily Bulletin. July 25, 2009. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  22. "Former County Chief Sentenced in Bribery Case". Los Angeles Times. November 30, 2005. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  23. "San Bernardino County Remains King of Corruption". www.cp-dr.com.
  24. Yarbrough, Beau. "Insurance firm doesn't want to pay for San Bernardino County's settlement with Colonies developer". MSN. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  25. Content, Neil Derry Contributed. "Colonies corruption case: The inside story". Victorville Daily Press. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  26. Nelson, Joe (August 28, 2017). "3 of 4 Colonies corruption defendants found not guilty on all charges". Press Enterprise. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  27. "Trial Begins in Colonies Corruption Case". IE VOICE. January 6, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  28. Nelson, Joe (January 4, 2017). "'A dirty deal': Opening statements in Colonies corruption case". Press Enterprise. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  29. Estrada, Jene. "Appeals court says one-term limit, salary cap for San Bernardino County leaders is legal". High Desert Star. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  30. Estacio, Martin. "Court tentatively upholds measure which caps San Bernardino County supervisors' pay at $60k". Victorville Daily Press. Gannet. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  31. "A look at the Colonies corruption case through the years in San Bernardino County". San Bernardino Sun. December 31, 2016. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  32. "Colonies Corruption Case Now a Real Scandal". IE Business Daily. July 29, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  33. "Colonies Corruption Trial: Defendants Found Not Guilty on All Charges | California County News". californiacountynews.org. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  34. Harmatz, Jef (October 30, 2022). "San Bernardino County Measure D - What You Need To Know". Z107.7 FM Joshua Tree. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  35. "San Bernardino County voters approve Measure D, extending supervisor term limits". Daily Bulletin. November 10, 2022. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  36. "San Bernardino County's deceitful Measure D campaign: Jon Coupal". Orange County Register. October 21, 2022. Retrieved February 14, 2023.
  37. "Supervisors Make Hurried Buy-In Of Burum's Call For County Secession | SBCSentinel". San Bernardino County Sentinel. August 5, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  38. "Could San Bernardino County secede from California? Voters may have a say in November". Los Angeles Times. August 6, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  39. "San Bernardino County secession measure advances to November 2022 ballot". San Bernardino Sun. August 4, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  40. "'Welcome to Empire?': San Bernardino County urged to secede from California". East Bay Times. July 27, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  41. "County Supervisors urged to secede from California and form new state, "empire"". The Sacramento bee. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  42. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  43. "DataSet.txt". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved November 16, 2012. (See "Download the Database Archived November 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine " for an explanation of this data set.)
  44. "COUNTY of SAN BERNARDINO PUBLIC LANDS AT A GLANCE" (PDF). Retrieved April 7, 2020.
  45. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2023". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 26, 2024.
  46. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  47. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  48. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  49. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  50. 1 2 "P2: Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino by Race – 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - San Bernardino County, California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 26, 2024.
  51. 1 2 "P2: Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino by Race – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - San Bernardino County, California". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 26, 2024.
  52. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  53. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  54. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  55. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  56. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  57. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  58. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  59. "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  60. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  61. Quan, Douglas (September 25, 2007). "S.B. County steps up fight against homelessness". Press Enterprise. Archived from the original on May 20, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2007.
  62. "Budget". CAO Finance and Administration. San Bernardino County. Retrieved September 24, 2022.
  63. "San Bernardino County - Board of Supervisors". www.sbcounty.gov.
  64. "Elections Office of the Registrar of Voters > Elected Officials & Candidates > County". www.sbcountyelections.com. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  65. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved May 24, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  66. "San Bernardino County supervisors appoint Christopher Wilhite assessor for next 2 years". December 7, 2022.
  67. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 6, 2021. Retrieved September 6, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  68. "Counties by County and by District". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved September 24, 2014.
  69. "Members California State Assembly". California State Assembly. Archived from the original on May 27, 2023. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  70. "SENATE COUNTIES REPRESENTED" (PDF). California State Senate. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 5, 2023. Retrieved June 16, 2023.
  71. "San Bernardino County Fire Protection District". San Bernardino County Fire Protection District. Retrieved April 17, 2023.
  72. "San Bernardino County Firefighters – IAFF Local 935" . Retrieved April 17, 2023.
  73. "LAFCO Cert of Completion" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on February 1, 2017. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  74. "San Bernardino County Fire Department Annual Report 2014-2015" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on December 22, 2016. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  75. "Fire Board Holds Last Meeting". m.mountain-news.com. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  76. "LAFCO SB City Annexation Proposal" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  77. "29 Palms Revamping Fire Station | SBCSentinel". sbcsentinel.com. July 9, 2016. Archived from the original on July 5, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  78. "County OKs fire takeover: City of 29 Palms offers to buy, then lease station". Hi-Desert Star. Archived from the original on April 27, 2016. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  79. "San Bernardino County Fire Department Annual Report 2015-2016" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on February 25, 2017. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  80. "Upland gets OK to disband fire department, annex to San Bernardino County Fire Department". Daily Bulletin. July 12, 2017. Archived from the original on March 26, 2018. Retrieved March 15, 2018.
  81. "Victorville Fire Chief chosen to lead new city-run fire department". Victor Valley News Group | VVNG.com. March 21, 2018. Archived from the original on May 16, 2021. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  82. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration Archived July 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  83. "Report of Registration as of May 4, 2009 - Registration By County" (PDF). sos.ca.gov. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 13, 2010. Retrieved November 30, 2010.
  84. "Gay marriage ban: A tale of two votes". Los Angeles Times. ISSN   0458-3035 . Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  85. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  86. 1 2 3 United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  87. "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Imperial County, CA" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau . Retrieved July 25, 2022. - Text list
  88. "Library Locations". San Bernardino County Library. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  89. "Courses and Events". San Bernardino County Library. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  90. "Research and e-Content". San Bernardino County Library. Retrieved December 31, 2017.
  91. "A.K. Smiley Public Library history". Archived from the original on August 29, 2011.
  92. Victorville City (May 28, 2024). "Victorville City Library - About Us". Victorville City. Retrieved May 28, 2024.
  93. "Public libraries in San Bernardino County, CA". Google Maps. January 1, 1970. Retrieved November 5, 2011.
  94. "Keys Ranch Guided Walking Tour - Joshua Tree National Park". U.S. National Park Service. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  95. "About - Kimberly Crest House & Gardens". July 10, 2023. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  96. "SOCAL MUSEUMS | San Bernardino County Museum" . Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  97. "About Us | Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art | Chaffey College". www.chaffey.edu. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  98. Site L26 List of airports in California
  99. 1 2 Ritter, John (June 5, 2007). "Inland Empire's 25-year growth targeted". USA Today . Retrieved November 10, 2007.
  100. Office of the Attorney General, State of California, Brown Announces Landmark Global Warming Settlement, August 21, 2007.
  101. Barboza, Tony (October 1, 2015). "New attack on California's dirty air". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 1, 2023.
  102. Bureau, U.S. Census. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved October 6, 2019.
  103. "American Community Survey 1-Year and 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 22, 2022.
  104. "Explore Census Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  105. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov.
  106. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov.
  107. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov.
  108. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov.
  109. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov.
  110. "County Highpoints - Regional Lists". www.cohp.org.

34°50′N116°11′W / 34.83°N 116.19°W / 34.83; -116.19