San Luis Obispo County, California

Last updated

San Luis Obispo County
County of San Luis Obispo
Cerro San Luis.JPG
Justin vineyard.jpg
Pismo.jpg
MissionSanMiguelArches.JPG
Hearst Castle pool.jpg
Morro Rock 1.jpg
Images, from top down, left to right: Cerro San Luis (Mountain) in San Luis Obispo, a vineyard in Paso Robles, Pismo Beach, Mission San Miguel Arcángel, Neptune Pool at Hearst Castle, Morro Rock
Flag of San Luis Obispo County, California.svg
Seal of San Luis Obispo County, California.svg
Logo of San Luis Obispo County, California.jpg
Motto: 
"Not For Ourselves Alone"
San Luis Obispo County, California
Interactive map of San Luis Obispo County
Map of California highlighting San Luis Obispo County.svg
Location in the state of California
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
Region California Central Coast
Incorporated February 18, 1850 [1]
Named for Saint Louis, Bishop of Toulouse
County seat San Luis Obispo
Largest city (Population)San Luis Obispo
Largest city (Area) Atascadero
Government
  Type Council–Administration
  BodySan Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]
  Chair [7] John Peschong (R)
  Vice Chair [7] Debbie Arnold (R)
  Supervisors [7]
List
  • • John Peschong (R)
    District 1
  • • Bruce Gibson (D)
    District 2
  • • Dawn Ortiz-Legg (D)
    District 3
  • • Jimmy Paulding (D)
    District 4
  • • Debbie Arnold (R)
    District 5
  County Administrator [8] Wade Horton
Area
  Total3,616 sq mi (9,370 km2)
  Land3,299 sq mi (8,540 km2)
  Water317 sq mi (820 km2)
Highest elevation
[9]
5,109 ft (1,557 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total282,424
  Density86/sq mi (33/km2)
Time zone UTC-8 (Pacific Time Zone)
  Summer (DST) UTC-7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area code 805
Congressional district 24th
Website https://www.slocounty.ca.gov/
The entrance lobby and belfry of the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa. A statue of Fray Junipero Serra stands outside the church. MissionSanLuisEntrance.jpg
The entrance lobby and belfry of the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa. A statue of Fray Junípero Serra stands outside the church.
Robert Jack House, built c. 1882 Jack House - Front of House.JPG
Robert Jack House, built c. 1882

San Luis Obispo County ( /sænˌlɪsˈbɪsp/ ), officially the County of San Luis Obispo, is a county on the Central Coast of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 282,424. [10] The county seat is San Luis Obispo. [11]

Contents

Junípero Serra founded the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa in 1772, and San Luis Obispo grew around it. The small size of the county's communities, scattered along the beaches, coastal hills, and mountains of the Santa Lucia range, provides a wide variety of coastal and inland hill ecologies to support fishing, agriculture, and tourist activities.

California Polytechnic State University has almost 20,000 students. Tourism, especially for the wineries, is popular. Grapes and other agriculture products are an important part of the economy. San Luis Obispo County is the third largest producer of wine in California, surpassed only by Sonoma and Napa counties. Strawberries are the largest agricultural crop in the county. [12]

The town of San Simeon is located at the foot of the ridge where newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst built Hearst Castle. Other coastal towns (listed from north to south) include Cambria, Cayucos, Morro Bay, and Los Osos -Baywood Park. These cities and villages are located northwest of the city of San Luis Obispo. To the south are Avila Beach and the Five Cities region. The Five Cities originally were: Arroyo Grande, Grover Beach (then known as Grover City), Oceano, Fair Oaks and Halcyon. Today, the Five Cities region consists of Pismo Beach, Grover Beach, Arroyo Grande, Oceano, and Halcyon (basically the area from Pismo Beach to Oceano). Just south of the Five Cities, San Luis Obispo County borders northern Santa Barbara County. Inland, the cities of Paso Robles, Templeton, and Atascadero lie along the Salinas River, near the Paso Robles wine region. San Luis Obispo lies south of Atascadero and north of the Five Cities region.

History

The prehistory of San Luis Obispo County is strongly influenced by the Chumash people. There has been significant settlement here at least as early as the Millingstone Horizon thousands of years ago. Important settlements existed in coastal areas such as Morro Bay and Los Osos. [13] [14]

Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa was founded on September 1, 1772, in the area that is now the city of San Luis Obispo. The namesake of the mission, city and county is Saint Louis of Toulouse, the young bishop of Toulouse (Obispo and Tolosa in Spanish) in 1297.

San Luis Obispo County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood.

The Salinas River Valley, a region that figures strongly in several John Steinbeck novels, stretches north from San Luis Obispo County.

Geography

San Luis Obispo Sanluisobispo.jpg
San Luis Obispo
Sand dunes - Oceano CA Sand dunes - Oceano CA.jpg
Sand dunes - Oceano CA
Morro Bay Docks Morro Bay Docks.jpg
Morro Bay Docks

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,616 square miles (9,370 km2), of which 3,299 square miles (8,540 km2) is land and 317 square miles (820 km2) (comprising 8.8%) is water. [15]

Climate

Koppen climate types of San Luis Obispo County, California, using 1991-2020 climate normals. Koppen Climate Classification of San Luis Obispo County.png
Köppen climate types of San Luis Obispo County, California, using 1991-2020 climate normals.

San Luis Obispo County has three main climate types. BSk climate can mainly be found in the eastern portions of the county, along with certain smaller areas in the north. Csa climate can mainly be found in the central portions of the counties, in communities such as Paso Robles. The rest of the county is made up of the Csb climate type. The Csb warm-summer mediterranean type climate together with the county's varied landscapes reminds visitors of European locales. [16]

Adjacent counties

Areas adjacent to San Luis Obispo County, California

National protected areas

Marine Protected Areas

Piedras Blancas State Marine Reserve and Marine Conservation Area, an elephant seal rookery. Piedras Blancas Seals.jpg
Piedras Blancas State Marine Reserve and Marine Conservation Area, an elephant seal rookery.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1850 336
1860 1,782430.4%
1870 4,772167.8%
1880 9,14291.6%
1890 16,07275.8%
1900 16,6373.5%
1910 19,38316.5%
1920 21,89312.9%
1930 29,61335.3%
1940 33,24612.3%
1950 51,41754.7%
1960 81,04457.6%
1970 105,69030.4%
1980 155,43547.1%
1990 217,16239.7%
2000 246,68113.6%
2010 269,6379.3%
2020 282,4244.7%
2023 (est.)281,639 [17] −0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [18]
1790–1960 [19] 1900–1990 [20]
1990–2000 [21] 2010 [22] 2020 [23]

2020 census

San Luis Obispo County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [22] Pop 2020 [23] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)191,696183,46871.09%64.96%
Black or African American alone (NH)5,1284,3301.90%1.53%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)1,3671,1360.51%0.40%
Asian alone (NH)8,10610,0013.01%3.54%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)3463400.13%0.12%
Some Other Race alone (NH)7841,6140.29%0.57%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH)6,23713,6142.31%4.82%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)55,97367,92120.76%24.05%
Total269,637282,424100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010

The 2010 United States Census reported that San Luis Obispo County had a population of 269,637. The racial makeup of San Luis Obispo County was 222,756 (82.6%) White, 5,550 (2.1%) African American, 2,536 (0.9%) Native American, 8,507 (3.2%) Asian (1.0% Filipino, 0.6% Chinese, 0.4% Japanese, 0.3% Indian, 0.3% Korean, 0.2% Vietnamese), 389 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 19,786 (7.3%) from other races, and 10,113 (3.8%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 55,973 persons (20.8%); 17.7% of San Luis Obispo County is Mexican, 0.3% Puerto Rican, and 0.2% Salvadoran. [31]

2000 Census

As of the census [32] of 2000, there were 246,681 residents, 92,739 households, and 58,611 families in the county. The population density was 75 people per square mile (29 people/km2). There were 102,275 housing units at an average density of 31 units per square mile (12 units/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.6% White, 2.0% Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 2.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 6.2% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. 16.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 13.9% were of German, 11.4% English, 9.7% Irish, 6.1% American and 5.7% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000. 85.7% spoke English and 10.7% Spanish as their first language.

There were 92,739 households, out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.40% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.7% under the age of 18, 13.6% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 105.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.2 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,428, and the median income for a family was $52,447. Males had a median income of $40,726 versus $27,450 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,864. About 6.8% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Clubhair mariposa lily near SLO city, 2014 Club-haired Calochortus (Calochortus clavatus).jpg
Clubhair mariposa lily near SLO city, 2014

The mainstays of the economy are California Polytechnic State University with its almost 20,000 students, tourism, and agriculture.The economic indicators reveal that San Luis Obispo County aligns closely with California regarding median household income and poverty rates. However, the county distinguishes itself through higher educational attainment and homeownership rates, alongside a distinctive employment sector composition favoring agriculture and related industries. Despite these strengths, the county is not immune to challenges, as evidenced by a housing market that is significantly more expensive than the rest of California and growing income inequality. [33] San Luis Obispo County's economy is primarily a service economy. Service jobs account for 38% of the county's jobs, government jobs accounts for 20.7%, and manufacturing jobs represent 6% of the county's jobs.

San Luis Obispo County is the third largest producer of wine in California, surpassed only by Sonoma and Napa counties. Wine grapes are the second largest agricultural crop in the county (after strawberries), [12] and the wine production they support creates a direct economic impact and a growing wine country vacation industry.

The county led the state in hemp cultivation in 2018 as hundreds of acres of the crop were grown in research partnerships. [34] In 2019, nine agricultural research permits were still active. Sixteen commercial permits were issued before a temporary ban on new applications running through June 2020 was passed by the Board of Supervisors. [35]

Politics

Voter registration

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

San Luis Obispo County leaned toward the Republican Party in presidential and congressional elections during the most of the 20th century; it has, however, become more Democratic starting in the 2000s. In 2008, Barack Obama won the county with 51.2 percent of the vote. [38] Prior to 2008, the last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, although Bill Clinton won a plurality in 1992. In 2012, Obama again won the county, this time with a slim plurality of the vote. Hillary Clinton won with a larger plurality in 2016; and in 2020, Joe Biden won a solid 55% of the vote, the largest for any Democrat since Lyndon Johnson in 1964.

United States presidential election results for San Luis Obispo County, California [39]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 67,43642.22%88,31055.29%3,9682.48%
2016 56,16440.94%67,10748.91%13,93110.15%
2012 59,96747.61%61,25848.63%4,7413.76%
2008 61,05545.85%68,17651.20%3,9242.95%
2004 67,99552.69%58,74245.52%2,3131.79%
2000 56,85952.22%44,52640.89%7,5016.89%
1996 46,73346.50%40,39540.19%13,37213.31%
1992 36,38434.78%40,13638.36%28,09926.86%
1988 46,61355.85%35,66742.73%1,1871.42%
1984 49,03563.72%26,94635.02%9691.26%
1980 38,63155.56%20,50829.50%10,38814.94%
1976 27,78551.17%24,92645.91%1,5872.92%
1972 28,56655.98%20,77940.72%1,6883.31%
1968 19,42051.27%15,82841.78%2,6336.95%
1964 14,90640.08%22,25259.84%280.08%
1960 17,86254.04%14,97545.30%2180.66%
1956 16,22358.47%11,40741.11%1180.43%
1952 17,71665.37%9,17433.85%2130.79%
1948 10,32553.49%8,13542.14%8444.37%
1944 7,79348.90%8,06850.63%750.47%
1940 7,20445.25%8,49953.39%2171.36%
1936 4,81237.28%7,88961.13%2051.59%
1932 3,44928.59%7,93365.77%6805.64%
1928 5,42560.82%3,33637.40%1591.78%
1924 3,80449.01%7319.42%3,22641.57%
1920 4,12361.31%1,60623.88%99614.81%
1916 2,85440.20%3,53949.85%7069.95%
1912 130.23%2,24840.48%3,29259.28%
1908 2,00850.76%1,38134.91%56714.33%
1904 2,01554.95%1,16731.82%48513.23%
1900 1,56445.81%1,71350.18%1374.01%
1896 1,67143.74%2,05653.82%932.43%
1892 1,43338.10%1,19931.88%1,12930.02%
1888 1,68949.68%1,58546.62%1263.71%
1884 1,23351.44%1,06944.60%953.96%
1880 83047.81%72941.99%17710.20%

County voters supported Republican Meg Whitman in 2010 and Democrat Jerry Brown in 2014. The previous Democrat to carry the county in a gubernatorial election was Gray Davis in 1998.

With respect to the United States House of Representatives, San Luis Obispo County is mostly in California's 24th congressional district , represented by Democrat Salud Carbajal, with the northern part of the county in California's 19th congressional district , represented by Democrat Jimmy Panetta. [40] From 2003 until 2013, the county was split between the Bakersfield-based 22nd district, which was represented by Republican Kevin McCarthy and included Paso Robles and most of the more conservative inland areas of the county, and Lois Capps' 23rd district, a strip which included most of the county's more liberal coastal areas as well as coastal areas of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

With respect to the California State Senate, the county is in the 17th Senate District , represented by Democrat John Laird. With respect to the California State Assembly, the county is in the 30th Assembly District , represented by Democrat Dawn Addis.

In April 2008, the California Secretary of State reported that there were 147,326 registered voters in San Luis Obispo County. Of those voters, 61,226 (41.6%) were registered Republicans, 52,586 (35.7%) were registered Democratic, 8,030 (5.4%) are registered with other political parties, and 25,484 (17.3%) declined to state a political preference. The cities of Grover Beach, Morro Bay, and San Luis Obispo had pluralities or majorities of registered Democratic voters, whereas the rest of the county's towns, cities, and the unincorporated areas have a plurality or majority of registered Republican voters.[ citation needed ]

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates

Fire protection

San Luis Obispo County Fire Department
Agency overview
Annual callsApproximately 20,000
Annual budget25 million
Facilities and equipment
Battalions5
Stations 21
Engines 17 - first run
5 - reserve
Rescues 2
Tenders 3
HAZMAT 1
USAR 2
Airport crash 2
Wildland 2 - type 3
Light and air 1
Website
Official website

In unincorporated parts of the county, fire protection and emergency response services have been provided by the San Luis Obispo County Fire Department, a division of CAL FIRE, since 1930. The county fire department also serves Los Osos, Pismo Beach and Avila Beach. [44] The city of San Luis Obispo is served by the San Luis Obispo City Fire Department.

Transportation

Major highways

Public transportation

San Luis Obispo County is served by Amtrak trains and Greyhound Lines buses. The San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority provides countywide service along US 101 as well as service to Morro Bay, Los Osos, Cambria and San Simeon.

The cities of San Luis Obispo, Atascadero and Paso Robles operate their own local bus services; all of these connect with SLORTA routes.

Oceano County Airport in 2013 Oceano County Airport 2013.jpg
Oceano County Airport in 2013

Intercity service is provided by Amtrak trains, Greyhound Lines and Orange Belt Stages buses.

The Amtrak Thruway 18 provides a daily connection to Visalia on the east, and Santa Maria on the west, with several stops in between. [45]

FlixBus boards from the San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum at 1940 Santa Barbara Avenue.

Airports

Future

In the future, SR 46 may be considered for a possible westward expansion of Interstate 40 via SR 58 from Barstow to Bakersfield, from Bakersfield to I-5 via Westside Parkway, and then following SR 46 to Paso Robles. [46] SR 46 is slowly being upgraded to Interstate standards, minus overpasses between Interstate 5 and US Route 101.

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated communities

Pair of Bat stars near Los Osos Pair of Asterina miniatas Bat stars.jpg
Pair of Bat stars near Los Osos

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of San Luis Obispo County. [47]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2020 Census)
1 San Luis Obispo City47,063
2 Paso Robles(El Paso de Robles) City31,490
3 Atascadero City29,773
4 Arroyo Grande City18,441
5 Nipomo CDP18,176
6 Los Osos CDP14,465
7 Grover Beach City12,701
8 Morro Bay City10,757
9 Templeton CDP8,386
10 Pismo Beach City8,072
11 Oceano CDP7,183
12 Cambria CDP5,678
13 San Miguel CDP3,172
14 Lake Nacimiento CDP2,956
15 Cayucos CDP2,505
16 Woodlands CDP1,933
17 Avila Beach CDP1,576
18 Los Ranchos CDP1,516
19 Santa Margarita CDP1,291
20 Callender CDP1,282
21 Shandon CDP1,168
22 Blacklake CDP1,016
23 Los Berros CDP623
24 Garden Farms CDP449
25 San Simeon CDP445
26 Whitley Gardens CDP325
27 Oak Shores CDP316
28 Edna CDP184
29 Creston CDP98

See also

Notes

  1. Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  2. Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. 1 2 Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 For statistical purposes, defined by the United States Census Bureau as a census-designated place (CDP).

Footnotes

  1. "Chronology". California State Association of Counties. Retrieved February 6, 2015.
  2. "John Peschong, Supervisor, District 1 from San Luis Obispo County, California".
  3. "Bruce Gibson, Supervisor, District 2 from San Luis Obispo County, California".
  4. "Dawn Ortiz-Legg, Supervisor, District 3 from San Luis Obispo County, California".
  5. "Lynn Compton, Supervisor, District 4 from San Luis Obispo County, California".
  6. "Debbie Arnold, Supervisor, District 5 from San Luis Obispo County, California".
  7. 1 2 3 "Board of Supervisors - County of San Luis Obispo".
  8. "Contact - County of San Luis Obispo".
  9. "Caliente Mountain". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  10. "San Luis Obispo County, California". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  11. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  12. 1 2 Settevendemie, Marty. "2020 Crop Report" (PDF). San Luis Obispo County Department of Agriculture.
  13. Terry L. Jones and Kathryn Klar (2007) California Prehistory: Colonization, Culture, and Complexity, Published by Rowman Altamira ISBN   0-7591-0872-2, 408 pages
  14. C. Michael Hogan (2008) Morro Creek, ed. by A. Burnham
  15. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  16. "Places in San Luis Obispo County that look like Europe, Africa, & South America". www.slocal.com. March 2, 2021. Archived from the original on April 4, 2024. Retrieved April 4, 2024.
  17. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2023". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 26, 2024.
  18. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  19. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  20. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  21. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  22. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - San Luis Obispo County, California". United States Census Bureau .
  23. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - San Luis Obispo County, California". United States Census Bureau .
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  25. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  26. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  27. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  28. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  29. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  30. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  31. "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  32. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  33. "The Economy of San Luis Obispo County". WealthCareLawyer. April 2, 2024. Archived from the original on April 4, 2024. Retrieved April 4, 2024.
  34. Vaughan, Monica (June 18, 2019). "Hemp could be big money for SLO County farmers. Did politicians scare away investors?". San Luis Obispo Tribune . Retrieved June 24, 2019.
  35. Wilson, Nick (October 31, 2019). "SLO County hemp harvest is in full swing, but here's why it's not as big as it could be". San Luis Obispo Tribune. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  36. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration Archived July 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  37. https://elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov/ror/15day-recall-2021/county.pdf [ bare URL PDF ]
  38. Map of Election Results, County-by-County: The New York Times
  39. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  40. "California's 24th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  41. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  42. Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  43. 1 2 3 United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  44. "San Luis Obispo County Fire Department". calfireslo.org. Retrieved April 5, 2023.
  45. https://amtraksanjoaquins.com/route18/
  46. Report on the Status of the Federal-Aid Highway Program. United States Senate. April 15, 1970. p. 89.
  47. "Explore Census Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 27, 2021.

Further reading

35°23′N120°27′W / 35.38°N 120.45°W / 35.38; -120.45

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kings County, California</span> County in California, United States

Kings County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. The population was 152,486 at the 2020 census. The county seat is Hanford.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Monterey County, California</span> County in California, United States

Monterey County, officially the County of Monterey, is a county located on the Pacific coast in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, its population was 439,035. The county's largest city and county seat is Salinas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Santa Barbara County, California</span> County in California, United States

Santa Barbara County, officially the County of Santa Barbara, is located in Southern California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 448,229. The county seat is Santa Barbara, and the largest city is Santa Maria.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ventura County, California</span> County in California, United States

Ventura County is a county located in the southern part of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 843,843. The largest city is Oxnard, and the county seat is the city of Ventura.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Atascadero, California</span> City in California, United States

Atascadero is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States, located on U.S. Route 101. Atascadero is part of the San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles metropolitan statistical area, which encompasses the extents of the county. Atascadero is farther inland than most other cities in the county, and as a result, usually experiences warmer, drier summers, and cooler winters than other nearby cities such as San Luis Obispo and Pismo Beach. The main freeway through town is U.S. 101. The nearby State Routes 41 and 46 provide access to the Pacific Coast and the Central Valley of California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Morro Bay, California</span> City in California, United States

Morro Bay is a seaside city in San Luis Obispo County, California. Located on the Central Coast of California, the city population was 10,757 as of the 2020 census, up from 10,234 at the 2010 census. The town overlooks Morro Bay, a natural embayment with an all-weather small craft commercial and recreational harbor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oceano, California</span> Census designated place in California, United States

Oceano is a census-designated place (CDP) in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States. The population was 7,183 at the 2020 census, down from 7,286 at the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pismo Beach, California</span> City in California, United States

Pismo Beach is a city in the southern portion of San Luis Obispo County, in the Central Coast area of California, United States. Its estimated population was 8,072 at the 2020 census, up from 7,655 in the 2010 census. It is part of the Five Cities area, a cluster of cities in that area. The Five Cities area historically is made up of Arroyo Grande, Grover City, Halcyon, Fair Oaks, and Nipomo. Now most people refer to the Five Cities as Grover Beach, Pismo Beach, Shell Beach, Arroyo Grande, and Oceano.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Luis Obispo, California</span> City in California, United States

San Luis Obispo is a city and county seat of San Luis Obispo County, in the U.S. state of California. Located on the Central Coast of California, San Luis Obispo is roughly halfway between the San Francisco Bay Area in the north and Greater Los Angeles in the south. The population was 47,063 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Templeton, California</span> Census-designated place in California, United States

Templeton is a census-designated place (CDP) in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States. The population was 7,674 at the 2010 census, up from 4,687 at the 2000 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Central Coast (California)</span> Region of California in the United States

The Central Coast is an area of California, roughly spanning the coastal region between Point Mugu and Monterey Bay. It lies northwest of Los Angeles and south of the San Francisco Bay Area, and includes the rugged, rural, and sparsely populated stretch of coastline known as Big Sur.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">California State Route 46</span> Highway in California

State Route 46 is an east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California. It is a major crossing of the Coast Ranges and it is the southernmost crossing of the Diablo Range, connecting SR 1 on the Central Coast near Cambria and US 101 in Paso Robles with SR 99 at Famoso in the San Joaquin Valley.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Area codes 805 and 820</span> Area codes in central California, United States

Area codes 805 and 820 are telephone area codes in the North American Numbering Plan (NANP) for the U.S. state of California. The numbering plan area (NPA) includes most or all of the counties of San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, and the southernmost portions of Monterey County. 805 was split from area code 213 in 1957, and area code 820 was added to the NPA in 2018, creating an area code overlay.

California Valley is an unincorporated community located in the eastern part of San Luis Obispo County, California, in the northern portion of the Carrizo Plain.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">California State Route 41</span> Highway in California

State Route 41 is a state highway in the U.S. State of California, connecting the Central Coast with the San Joaquin Valley and the Sierra Nevada. Its southern terminus is at the Cabrillo Highway in Morro Bay, and its northern terminus is at SR 140 in Yosemite National Park. It has been constructed as an expressway from near SR 198 in Lemoore north to the south part of Fresno, where the Yosemite Freeway begins, passing along the east side of downtown and extending north into Madera County.

California's 19th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California, currently represented by Democrat Jimmy Panetta.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Creston, California</span> Census-designated place in California, United States

Creston is a census-designated place in San Luis Obispo County, California, about 10 miles east of Atascadero.

The San Luis Obispo Regional Transit Authority is the provider of intercity mass transportation in San Luis Obispo County, California, with service between most cities in the county: Arroyo Grande, Atascadero, Paso Robles, Grover Beach, Morro Bay, Pismo Beach, Cambria, San Simeon, Los Osos, Cayucos, and San Luis Obispo. Hourly routes operate Monday - Friday, with limited Saturday & Sunday service. The base travel fare is $1.75-$3.25 each way, or a Regional day pass may be purchased for $5.50, good for unlimited trips on all fixed-routes in the county. Five routes are branded as part of the SLORTA. RTA also operates fixed route transit service in Paso Robles and the Five Cities Area for South County Transit and the Avila Beach Trolley on a seasonal/summer runs.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paso Robles, California</span> City in California, United States

Paso Robles, officially El Paso de Robles, is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California, United States. Located on the Salinas River about 30 mi (48 km) north of San Luis Obispo, the city is known for its hot springs, abundance of wineries, production of olive oil, almond orchards, and playing host to the California Mid-State Fair. At the 2020 census, the population was 31,490.

<i>Paso Robles Press</i>

The Paso Robles Press began in June 1889, and has published continually since. The publication is currently a weekly printed newspaper and daily online publication based in Paso Robles, California, United States that serves the residents of northern San Luis Obispo County. It is operated by 13 Stars Media, with a readership primarily in Paso Robles and surrounding communities, including Templeton, San Miguel and Shandon.