Sandefjord

Last updated

Sandefjord kommune
Sandefjord Vestfold 2018.png
Sandefjord kirke1.JPG
Norway Counties Vestfold og Telemark Position.svg
Nickname(s): 
Hvalfangstbyen ("The Whaling City"), Badebyen ("The Bathing City")
NO 3804 Sandefjord.svg
Sandefjord within Vestfold og Telemark
Coordinates: 59°7′50″N10°13′00″E / 59.13056°N 10.21667°E / 59.13056; 10.21667 Coordinates: 59°7′50″N10°13′00″E / 59.13056°N 10.21667°E / 59.13056; 10.21667
Country Norway
County Vestfold og Telemark
District Vestfold
Administrative centreSandefjord
Government
  Mayor (2004–) Bjørn Ole Gleditsch (H)
Area
  Total433.27 km2 (167.29 sq mi)
  Land425.47 km2 (164.27 sq mi)
  Rank#232 [1] in Norway
Population
 (30 September 2020)
  Total64,345 Increase2.svg [2]
  Rank#11th in Norway
  Density338.8/km2 (877/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
Increase2.svg +46%
Demonym(s) Sandefjording [3]
Official language
[4]
   Norwegian form Bokmål
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-3804
Website Official website

Sandefjord ( Loudspeaker.svg pronunciation  ) is a city and the most populous municipality in Vestfold og Telemark county, Norway. The municipality of Sandefjord was established on 1 January 1838. The municipality of Sandar was merged into Sandefjord on 1 January 1969. On 1 January 2017, rural municipalities of Andebu and Stokke were merged into Sandefjord as part of a nationwide municipal reform. This merger was the first one to take place during the reform. [5]

Contents

The city is known for its rich Viking history and the prosperous whaling industry, which made Sandefjord the richest city in Norway. [6] Today, it has built up the third-largest merchant fleet in Norway. [7] It is home to Europe's only museum dedicated to whaling, and is home to Gokstad Mound where the 9th century Gokstad Ship was discovered.

Sandefjord has numerous nicknames, including the Viking, Whaling "capital" of Norway or as the undisputed summer city of Norway. [8] [9] The city is also known as the "whaling capital of the world." [10] [11] [12] [13] It has also been dubbed the "Bathing City" (Badebyen), due to its many beaches and former resort spas. [14] It is still considered a resort town, due to high numbers of visitors during summer months. [15]

Sandefjord has become a transportation hub, home of Torp International Airport, one of Norway's largest airports. Daily ferry connections to Sweden are provided by Fjord Line and Color Line from the city harbor. European Route E18, one of Norway's most important roads, traverses the municipality.

Sandefjord is a stronghold for the Conservative Party; [16] [17] [18] the Conservative coalition received over 70 percent of votes cast in 2011. Current mayor is Bjørn Ole Gleditsch from the Conservative Party, who has been mayor since 2004.

General information

The name originally belonged to the main fjord, now called the Sandefjordsfjord. Sandefjordsfjorden.png
The name originally belonged to the main fjord, now called the Sandefjordsfjord.

Etymology

The name Sandefjord, which dates to 1200 A.D., originates from the ancient farm name Sandar. [20] The first element is the genitive case of the name of the parish and former municipality of Sandar. [21] The name Sandar derives from the Old Norse term "sandar", which is the plural form of "sandr", translating to 'stretch of sand' (sandstrekning). [22] [23]

The name Sandefjord was first mentioned in chapter 169 of Sverris saga from the year 1200. It was then referring to the fjord which is now known as Sandefjordsfjord. [24]

Coat-of-arms

Sandefjord komm.svg
Coat-of-arms 1914–2017
Sandefjord komm 2017.svg
Coat-of-arms 2017–

The coat-of-arms dates from modern times, having been granted on 9 May 1914. [25] The Viking ship symbolizes the famous Gokstad ship, which was found in Sandefjord in 1880, one of the best preserved Viking ships known. The whale symbolizes that in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sandefjord was a main home port for whalers operating in the southern oceans. [26]

On 1 January 2017, Sandefjord received a new coat of arm after the merge with Andebu- and Stokke municipalities. [27] The arms has the title: Courage and Strength, and is created in black and gold. The arms was designed by Erik Raastad from Sandefjord, with minor modification by the heraldic expert Jan Eide from Oslo. The decision to get a new coat of arms was made by the merger committee in Andebu on 24 May 2016. [28]

History

Viking history

The 9th century Gokstad Ship was discovered in Sandefjord. Gokstad viking ship -excavation.jpg
The 9th century Gokstad Ship was discovered in Sandefjord.

Sandefjord has been inhabited for thousands of years. [20] Excavations indicate that people have inhabited Sandefjord for around 3,000 years. Rock carvings at Haugen farm by Istrehågan in Jåberg are dated to 1,500–500 BCE. [29] Haugen farm is home to Vestfold County's largest petroglyph site. [30] In 1961-1962, 78 rock carvings were discovered at the site. They consist of ships, spiral figures, circular hollows, and much more. [31]

The Vikings lived in Sandefjord and surrounding areas about 1,000 years ago, and numerous Viking artifacts and monuments can be found in Sandefjord. [32] One of the most important remains from the Viking Age was found at the grave site Gokstadhaugen (Gokstad Mound) in Sandefjord. The Gokstad ship was excavated by Nicolay Nicolaysen and is now in the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. The Viking , an exact replica of the Gokstad ship, crossed the Atlantic Ocean from Bergen to be exhibited at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. A replica of the Gokstad ship, called Gaia , currently has Sandefjord as home port. [33] [29] Other known replicas include the Munin, (a half scale replica) located in Vancouver, Canada.

The Gokstad Ship, Norway's largest preserved Viking ship, was discovered during an excavation at Gokstad Mound in 1880. The Vikings first settled here due to its speedy route from Sandefjord and along the coast. [34] Viking settlements and grave sites have been discovered in Sandefjord. [35]

Sandefjord functioned as a seaport defined by the twin industries of shipping and shipbuilding throughout the 1600s and 1700s. It was formally recognized as a market town by King Oscar in 1845. Its population at the time was 749 residents. [34]

Health resort

Kurbadet is housed in one of the largest wooden buildings in the Nordics. Sandefjord dom zdrojowy 2.jpg
Kurbadet is housed in one of the largest wooden buildings in the Nordics.

The city became known as a world-renowned health resort destination between 1837 and 1939. Royalty and Prime Ministers from throughout Europe visited the town for its spas in the late 1800s. [38] The city gained its reputation as a health- and pleasure community when Sandefjord sulfur spa and resort ("Sandefjord Kurbad") was established in 1837. It was the first spa in town and functioned as a medical institution focusing on the treatment of symptoms for rheumatic diseases. The original bathhouse has been restored and is now a culture house by the city center. [34] It was one of Europe's most visited baths until its closure in 1939. [39]

Around 50,000 people, mostly Norwegians, visited the bath from 1837 to 1939. Majority of spa visitors were from Norway, but international guests from Germany, Britain and the United States also visited the spas of Sandefjord. [29] Today the bath's building, Kurbadet , has been restored and hosts cultural events and various annual activities. [40]

Town fires

Sandefjord has experienced numerous town fires, including a town fire in 1800 which led to most of the town burning down and subsequently having to be rebuilt. [41] An additional fire in 1900 destroyed 56 houses and caused major damage. [29] Sandefjord's most important capital, its ships, and the shipping industry, remained untouched from the major fire of March 1900. [42] The fire, which started on the night before March 16, 1900, led to the entire city center burning down, including important business offices. Both newspapers in town, Sandefjords Blad and Vestfold, saw their offices burnt down. Six jewelry stores, three watchmakers, eight grocery stores, and a variety of other shops were destroyed. The fire started in the factory Nordmannen. The fire caused the loss of 51 buildings for a total value of NOK 1.5 million in addition to NOK 1 million in loss of store items. [43] Sandefjord Church from 1872 also burnt down during the town fire of 1900. [44]

A new town fire March 27 and 28 in 1915 led to the death of two people and destroyed seven farms. Large parts of the street Storgata were also destroyed. [45] [46]

Whaling and ships

Whaler's Monument is made in style of a compass, and it rotates slowly. Sandefjord Hvalfangstmonumentet.jpg
Whaler's Monument is made in style of a compass, and it rotates slowly.

Sandefjord is perhaps best known as a whaling community. [49] The centre of the world's modern whaling industry was located in town, and Sandefjordians not only made up practically all the crew on the Norwegian whaling fleet, but substantial numbers of Sandefjordians also worked within the whaling industry in nearby countries. For over fifty years in the late 1800s, Sandefjord functioned as the world center for the whaling industry, including the manufacture and equipment of whaling vessels, floating factories, and whale-catchers. [50] The city has also been named the "whaling capital of the world." [10] [11] [12] [13] 25 whaling companies were established in Sandefjord between 1905 and 1914. [51] During the 1911/12 season, Sandefjord had 27 whaling companies with a total of 115 vessels. This made up over 30 percent of the world's whaling firms. [52]

From 1850, a number of ships from Sandefjord were whaling and sealing in the Arctic Ocean and along the coast of Finnmark. The first whaling expedition from Sandefjord to the Antarctic Ocean was sent in 1905. Towards the end of the 1920s, Sandefjord had a fleet of 15 factory ships and more than 90 whalers. In 1954, more than 2,800 men from the district were hired as crew on the whalers, but from the mid-1950s whaling was gradually reduced. The number of southbound expeditions rapidly decreased during the 1960s, and the 1967/68 season became the last for Sandefjord. [51] In 1971, the city’s last whale processing vessel was sold to Japan. [53] The shipping industry was gradually readjusted from whaling to other ship types during this period. The local Framnæs Mekaniske Værksted and Jotun Group Private Ltd. had major roles in this business.

Southern Actor, museum ship at Museum's Wharf Sandefjord Southern Actor.jpg
Southern Actor , museum ship at Museum's Wharf
Christian Radich, full-rigged ship built in Sandefjord Tall ship Christian Radich under sail.jpg
Christian Radich , full-rigged ship built in Sandefjord

Today, the memories of this important period of the city's history are kept alive at the Whaling Museum (Hvalfangstmuseet). This museum is the only museum in Europe specializing in whales and the history of whaling. [32] [54] The history of the whalers can also be explored at the Museum's Wharf with a visit aboard the whale-catcher Southern Actor . Whaling is considered to be the industry which made Sandefjord the richest city in Norway. [6]

Sandefjord also has shipping traditions of tall sailing ships and steam ships. The full-rigged sailing ship Christian Radich , three-masted barquentine Endurance , whale catcher Jason and Viking ship replica Viking were some of the many ships built by Framnæs Mekaniske Værksted.

Hans Albert Grøn of Sandefjord established the first whaling station in the Faroe Islands in 1894, which was located at Gjánoyri on the island of Streymoy. [55] [56] As of 1903, half of all whaling companies in the Faroe Islands were operated out of Sandefjord. [57] Furthermore, Sandefjord was the headquarters of the South African Whaling Company (SAWC), which was established in 1908 and managed by shipowner Johan Bryde of Sandefjord. [58] Sandefjordian whaling firms were also established on the coast of Africa, in Portugal, Mexico, Western Australia, among other places. [59]

Antarctic expeditions

The Norwegian flag was raised at Framnaesodden in Sandefjord Cove on Antarctica's Peter I Island in 1929. Peter I Island 1929A.jpg
The Norwegian flag was raised at Framnæsodden in Sandefjord Cove on Antarctica's Peter I Island in 1929.
Norway achieved sovereignty of Bouvet Island during Nils Larsen's Antarctic expeditions. Bouvet island.jpg
Norway achieved sovereignty of Bouvet Island during Nils Larsen's Antarctic expeditions.

Towards the beginning of World War I, Norwegian whaling spread throughout the world, most and foremost from Sandefjord. Expeditions from Sandefjord went as far as Norwegian Bay in Australia, Stewart Island in New Zealand, Walvis Bay in Namibia, Corral, Chile, and also isolated places such as Kerguelen Islands, South Georgia Island, Bouvet Island, and the Southern Ocean. [61]

In the 1910s, affluent Sandefjordian August F. Christensen was given a grant to practice whaling outside Peru and Ecuador. He was also appointed Ecuador's consul to Norway. He achieved an agreement with Ecuadorian government officials which allowed Norwegians to inhabit the Galápagos Islands, and also receive 200 hectares of land, pay no taxes for ten years, and be allowed to keep their Norwegian citizenship. [62] [63] Christensen created huge local interest of Galápagos, and the local company La Colonia de Floreana A/S was established on 21 March 1925. Its main goal was to exploit the Norwegian fishing rights at the Galápagos Islands. A ship named Floreana departed from Sandefjord on 15 May 1925, equipped with enough men and goods to establish a colony. [64]

Model of Whalers Church in Grytviken, exhibit at Sandefjord Museum. Modell av Grytviken kirke (HS.03422).jpg
Model of Whalers Church in Grytviken, exhibit at Sandefjord Museum.

On 16 November 1904, Carl Anton Larsen of Sandefjord established the whaling community of Grytviken, the largest settlement in South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. [65] [66] South Georgia Island lies a few thousand kilometers east of Cape Horn. [67]

Nils Larsen (1900–76) was a sea captain from Sandefjord, famous for his expeditions of Antarctica in the early 20th century. It was under his expeditions that Norway achieved annexation of Bouvet Island in 1927 and Peter I Island two years after. A cove on Antarctica's Peter I Island is named Sandefjord Cove in honor of Larsen's hometown. [68] [69] Sandefjord Ice Bay in continental Antarctica is also named after Sandefjord. [70] Mount Nils Larsen in Queen Maud Land, Mount Nils in Enderby Land and Nils Larsen Glacier are examples of many geographical names given in honor of Nils Larsen. [71]

World War II

German fortresses were constructed on both West- and East Island. Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-113-0003-15, Nordeuropa, Kustenbatterie, Bunker.jpg
German fortresses were constructed on both West- and East Island.

A week after Operation Weserübung, German forces entered Sandefjord on April 16, 1940. 30-40 men arrived in semi-trucks from Horten under the leadership of Erik von Drydalski. After handing their directives to Sandefjord police chief Kjartan Bruun Hansen, the men left for Hotel Atlantic, where they established their headquarters in the city. German troops in the city soon rose to 200. [72] At the beginning of the German occupation of Norway, a German Hafenkapitän (harbormaster) was placed at Tollboden, and a representative for Admiral Norwegen was placed in an office building at Framnes verft. German soldiers could be seen marching throughout the city. At the beginning of the occupation, over 2,000 German officers visited Socitetsbygningen (today's Park Hotel), which belonged to Sandefjord Spa. The Nazi flag was waving over the building during the visit. Norwegian students were told to learn the German language, and handed out a book, Deutsche Fibel . They were also given a copy of Adolf Hitler's book Mein Kampf translated into the Norwegian language. [73]

Albert Skalsvik of Krokemoa is honored at Minnehallen. Albert-kristoffer-johan-skalsvik.jpg
Albert Skålsvik of Krokemoa is honored at Minnehallen .

German forces constructed two coastal forts in Sandefjord, located at the southern tips of both West- and East Islands. The largest German construction in Sandefjord took place at Folehavna, where a fortress was erected in the spring of 1941. Four cannons with a target range of 14 kilometers were installed at the site, along with a 120-meter tunnel. The four 15 cm cannons were installed in concrete gun pits on the sloping rocks. German construction also took place by Goksjø Lake, and also at Jernbaneallén, where a former garage structure was turned into a prison camp. [74] [75]

Many Sandefjordians were killed during World War II, including a number of seamen. Håkon Andersen of Framnes was killed onboard Arcturus when the ship was attacked by British Beaufighters. Albert K. J. Skålsvik (1921–1944) of Krokemoa, a member of the Norwegian Homefleet ("Hjemmeflåten"), was 18 years when the war broke out. Skålsvik was killed, along with the captain, when the ship DS Kong Bjørn was attacked by allied warplanes by Ryvingen Lighthouse in 1944. He is now commemorated at the Hall of Remembrance in Stavern (Larvik). Skålsvik's younger brother, Bernard, was also a part of the Homefleet and was killed at age 17 in 1945. [76] [77]

Radios were illegal, and Sandefjordians such as Henry Melby of Gokstad was arrested for having a radio in 1942. He was incarcerated at the tanker Inger Johanne, which was attacked by allied warplanes in 1944, killing 15 people, including Henry Melby. [76]

In the fall of 1941, German occupation forces replaced Sandefjord's city manager Finn Sandberg with NS-member Frithjof Holtedahl who was soon appointed mayor. Sandar received its NS mayor in November 1941, Ole Kristian Holtan. [78] Olaf Bøe from Nasjonal Samling was appointed editor for Sandefjords Presse by Anders Beggerud in 1944. [78]

Following World War II, Norway became one of the founding members of NATO and several air bases were constructed in Norway using NATO funds. One of these was Sandefjord Airport Torp, which was to be used by the United States Air Force in case of war. Construction began in 1953 and was completed in July 1956.

SAS merge

Rural municipalities of Andebu and Stokke merged into Sandefjord in 2017. Dalaasen.jpg
Rural municipalities of Andebu and Stokke merged into Sandefjord in 2017.

The municipalities of Sandefjord (S), Andebu (A) and Stokke (S) merged on 1 January 2017. The merge was the first of numerous nationwide merges following a municipal reform by the Solberg Cabinet. [79] [80] The "new" municipality is 425.47 km2, including freshwater lakes and rivers. [81] It is 11th most populated municipality in Norway, and the most populous in Vestfold County. [1] Proposed names for the "new" municipality were Gokstad, Sandar and Torp, however, the name Sandefjord was ultimately kept. [82]

A poll conducted by Sandefjords blad in January 2015 called 600 residents in Andebu, 750 in Stokke, and 1,000 in Sandefjord. All were given the question "Do you think Stokke, Andebu, and Sandefjord should establish one single municipality?". 69% of Sandefjord residents answered "yes", while 64% (Andebu) and 61% (Stokke) answered "yes" in Stokke and Andebu. [83]

Few Stokke residents read Sandefjords Blad , the main newspaper of Sandefjord, and relatively few residents commute to Sandefjord proper for work. However, Sandefjord's wealth and its international airport have been seen as key factors as to why Stokke residents decided to merge. [84] 77.8 percent of Stokke residents ultimately voted to merge into Sandefjord during the September 2015 elections. [85]

Historical population

Postcard of Sandefjord - about 1970 Norge Sandefjord (7998937239).jpg
Postcard of Sandefjord − about 1970
Ommestadkollen Ommestadkollen, Sandefjord, Vestfold, Norway - panoramio.jpg
Ommestadkollen
Sandefjord in 1947 Sandefjord (14547787946).jpg
Sandefjord in 1947

The city experienced a 98.6 percent population growth from 1875 to 1900. Even not including Sandar's merge into Sandefjord in 1888, this population increase was substantially higher than most Norwegian cities. Sandar experienced the largest population growth of any Norwegian town, and over twice the growth of other towns in Vestfold County. [86]

From 1875 to 1900, the disposable income of Sandefjordians increased by over 200 percent. [87] Total assets in local banks also increased, and in 1895–1900, total assets went from 0.6 to 1.9 million in Aktiekreditbanken and from 1.1 million to 1.3 million in Sandefjords Sparebank. [88] Even after whaling lost its importance, Sandefjord remained Norway's richest city, and from 1913 to 1917, the median income increased by over 350 percent. [89]

Population of Sandefjord
YearPopulationNotes
1801373 [90]
1825590 [91]
1845749
18651,796 [90]
18752,484 [90]
19005,180 [90]
19516,717 [92]
19606,696
197031,752Sandefjord and Sandar merged on 1 January 1969 [25]
198034,758
199035,888
200039,317
201043,126 [93]
201761,218Sandefjord, Stokke and Andebu merged on 1 January 2017 [94]
202164,816 [95]

Geography

The bridge to Natholmen, one of 116 islands in Sandefjord. Brua til Natholmen.jpg
The bridge to Natholmen, one of 116 islands in Sandefjord.
The Stauper Islands Stauper - panoramio (2).jpg
The Stauper Islands

Sandefjord is a coastal city on the western shore of the Oslo Fjord. It can be described as a suburb of Oslo, situated 110 kilometres (68 mi) southwest of the capital. [98] It is the largest city in Vestfold og Telemark County. Its 93-mile long coastline has various beaches and sheltered coves, and several forests are also within city limits. [32] The two peninsulas called Østerøya ("East Island") and Vesterøya ("West Island") contribute to a total coastline of 146 kilometres (91 mi), and form the Sandefjordsfjord and Mefjord. The coastline offers a wide variety of sandy beaches, skerries, and islets (116 in total), along with bays and sloping rocks. Forested areas are often laced with paths and lighted for trails for summer hikes and winter skiing. [99] Of Sandefjord's total area, 37.7 square kilometres (14.6 sq mi) (31%) is agricultural and 36.2 square kilometres (14.0 sq mi) (26%) is forest. 2 percent is made up of lakes and rivers. [100] Neighbouring towns are Tønsberg and Larvik.

124 [101] -116 islands are within city limits. Small island bays give shelter for overnight campers, and many islets have relatively accessible beaches. [96] [102] Sandefjord is home to several peninsulas, including West Island (12 km²), East Island (8 km²), Engø (1 km²), Marøy, and Årø. Langøya (Langø) is the largest island at 0.55 km², while other islands include Ravnø (0.40 km²), Skogøy/Storøya (0.25 km²), Natholmen (0.2 km²), Storholmen (0.13 km²), Ormestadholmen (0.1 km²), Grindholmen (0.08 km²), and Granholmen (12 acres). Despite its location in-between Flautangen and Lindholmen (Tjøme) in the Tønsbergfjord, the archipelago of Stauper belongs to Sandefjord. It consists of ten large islands and a number of smaller skerries and islets. [103]

There were two natural lakes in Sandefjord prior to the 2017 merge: Goksjø, which is the third-largest in Vestfold County, and the smaller Napperødtjern (2,000 square metres (22,000 sq ft)). [104] Napperødtjern lies a few hundred meters north of Goksjø and is a nature preserve surrounded by swamp forests and wetland. [105] Artificial ponds include Bugårdsdammen, Brydedammen, Virikdammen, Kroksjø, Veradammen, Svarttjern, and others. Local wildlife such as moose, deer, and avifauna can often be observed near freshwater lakes and rivers. [106]

Sandefjord has four fjords: Sandefjordsfjord, Lahellefjord, Mefjord, and Tønsbergfjord, which it shares with neighboring Tønsberg. [107]

The highest point in the municipality is Brånafjell at 398.9 metres (1,309 ft), which lies northwest of Høyjord. [108] Hjertås at 148 metres (486 ft) above sea level is the highest point in the city of Sandefjord. From the peak are surrounding views of the Oslofjord, Vealøs by Skien, Skrim and Torp. [109] [110]

Climate

Bytunet in Byparken (City Park), spring 2008. Bytunet2.JPG
Bytunet in Byparken (City Park), spring 2008.
Sandefjord during winter. Sandefjord.jpg
Sandefjord during winter.
Tangen Beach during summer. Sandefjord Tangen north.JPG
Tangen Beach during summer.

The climate of the entirety of Norway is extremely affected by the Gulf Stream. Were it not for the warming effects of the Gulf Stream, coastal cities by Oslo Fjord would be up to 4 °C (7 °F) colder. [111] This means that the climate, the summers especially, are warmer than in other regions at the same latitude, i.e. the State of Alaska or Siberia. [112] [113] Sandefjord has a higher latitude than Juneau, Alaska; Sandefjord is at 59°08′N, while the capital of Alaska is at 58°18′N. Sandefjord experiences more sun than any other Norwegian city during the summer months. [114]

Warm breezes from Skagerrak cause a mild climate, and Sandefjord experiences the highest annual number of cloud-free days in Norway. [98] The climate is relatively mild for its latitude. Fields become green in early May, but the air remains slightly cold. The summer seldom begins before the end of May, when temperatures often rapidly increase. The whole month of June and most of July experience little darkness during night and songbirds are silent for only 2–3 hours at most. [115] July is the warmest month of the year in Sandefjord when temperatures often rise above 20 °C (68 °F). [116]

Sandefjord has a relatively humid continental climate (Dfb) with warm summers, no dry season, and relatively much precipitation year long. During the colder season, which is from the end of November until early March, there is a 56 percent average chance that precipitation will be observed during a given day. The likelihood of snow falling is highest in late January and the season in which it is likely to snowfall spans from early November until early April. The coldest day of the year in Sandefjord is 4 February, with an average low temperature of −6 °C (21 °F) and average high of only −1 °C (30 °F). [117]

Climate data for Sandefjord
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Mean maximum °C (°F)6
(43)
6
(43)
11
(52)
18
(64)
24
(75)
26
(79)
28
(82)
26
(79)
22
(72)
16
(61)
10
(50)
7
(45)
28
(82)
Average high °C (°F)1
(34)
1
(34)
4
(39)
10
(50)
16
(61)
20
(68)
22
(72)
21
(70)
16
(61)
11
(52)
5
(41)
1
(34)
11
(51)
Daily mean °C (°F)−0.6
(30.9)
−0.7
(30.7)
1.6
(34.9)
6.2
(43.2)
11
(52)
14.7
(58.5)
17.3
(63.1)
16.5
(61.7)
13.4
(56.1)
8.4
(47.1)
4.4
(39.9)
0.9
(33.6)
7.8
(46.0)
Average low °C (°F)−4
(25)
−5
(23)
−2
(28)
2
(36)
7
(45)
11
(52)
13
(55)
13
(55)
9
(48)
5
(41)
1
(34)
−3
(27)
4
(39)
Mean minimum °C (°F)−14
(7)
−14
(7)
−10
(14)
−4
(25)
1
(34)
5
(41)
9
(48)
8
(46)
2
(36)
−2
(28)
−6
(21)
−11
(12)
−14
(7)
Average precipitation mm (inches)75
(3.0)
53
(2.1)
52
(2.0)
52
(2.0)
52
(2.0)
57
(2.2)
60
(2.4)
76
(3.0)
64
(2.5)
93
(3.7)
83
(3.3)
68
(2.7)
785
(30.9)
Average precipitation days1310.810.41010.510.110.412.29.912.913.812.9136.9
Average snowy days6.65.74.51.2000000.12.25.325.6
Average relative humidity (%)82797673696974767681838277
Mean daily sunshine hours 3.34.57.09.011.312.912.210.27.54.93.33.07.4
Source 1: Meteoblue [118]
Source 2: climate-data.org [119]

Villages

Hoyjord Stave Church is the only stave church left in Vestfold County. Hoyjord stavkirke, MIS.jpg
Høyjord Stave Church is the only stave church left in Vestfold County.

Sandefjord Municipality consists of Sandefjord proper and an additional six villages: [101]

A small part of Sandefjord – the Himberg farm – is lying as an exclave inside the borders of the municipality of Larvik. [120] [121] All efforts at annexing Himberg into surrounding Larvik have been met with massive protests from local residents. A 1995 annexation attempt was ultimately canceled due to large protests from Himberg residents. Himberg is a rural agricultural community consisting of no more than ten households. [122] There are only four similar exclaves in Norway, and Himberg is the most populous exclave in the nation, with a population of around 40. It is 1.4 square kilometres (0.54 sq mi). [123]

Townscape

The elementary school Byskolen in city centre. ByskolenSandefjord.jpg
The elementary school Byskolen in city centre.
Gaia ship, replica of the Gokstad Ship given to the city in 1993. Gaia innsegling Kyststevnet 2014 (04).jpg
Gaia ship, replica of the Gokstad Ship given to the city in 1993.

Whaler's Monument, a Sandefjord trademark, is located at the end of the city's main street, Jernbanealléen, in the harbour area. [125] Nearby are the oceanfront restaurants Kokeriet and La Scala, two of the relatively few places where whale meat is regularly served. [126] [127] The Train- and nearby bus stations are approximately 800 metres (0.50 mi) up Jernbanealléen from the waterfront. [128] The main commercial areas are found on Jernbanealléen (main street), Storgata, Kongensgate and Hvaltorvet Shopping Centre. [129]

Sandefjord has a city centre, consisting of a mixture of old and modern buildings and a selection of shops. [130] It has a good selection of restaurants and cafés. According to the renowned restaurant guide, Salt & Pepper, Sandefjord holds what is possibly Norway's best gourmet restaurant which is located in a modern building near the harbour, known as Brygga11, run by Bocuse d'Or winner Geir Skeie. [131] [29] [132] Other restaurants include Chili, Kismat, Restaurant La Scala, Peppes Pizza , Kokeriet, Zorba, Lady og Landstryker'n, and others. Also located at the harbour, is the fishmonger well known for the quality of its goods and delicacies, including freshly caught shrimp, crab and fish. [130] The fishmonger, known as Brødrene Berggren, was established in 1911 and is among the oldest in Norway. [131] [133] [134] [135] It processed 1,000 tons of fish and shellfish per year as of year 2000. [136]

In the Bakgaarden (backyard) area are numerous cafés, boutiques, and art shops, as well as occasional summer concerts. Restaurants are found throughout the city and offer local specialties such as smoked salmon, dry-cured salmon, moose, reindeer, grouse, and deer. Sandar Haandverksbryggeri is a popular microbrewery, while wine tastings are offered at SMAK Winebar. Bars include Draaben Bar, James Clark Pub, Brygga Bar, and Pir 4. [116]

Street names are named for notable women in the Krokemoa area, such as Lauras vei (named for Laura Konstanse Jensen in 1993 [137] ), planets (Mosserød), bird species (Lystad), plant species (Unneberg), rock species (Nygård), insects (Gjekstad), and Norse mythology (Breidablikk), which has streets named for Freyja, Odin, Thor, Týr, Baldr, Frigg, Mjölnir, Bragi, Urðr, Loki, Þrymr, Jötunheimr, and various Norse gods. [138] [139] Streets are also named for notable people with ties to the city, including Wilhelm Wetlesen, Johan Bryde, Carl Anton Larsen, Christen Christensen, Jørgen Tandberg Ebbesen, Heinrich Arnold Thaulow, Nils Vibe Stockfleth, Peter Hersleb Harboe Castberg, Magnus Brostrup Landstad, and others. [140]

Architecture

Art Nouveau style in architecture is richly represented in Sandefjord. Sandefjord Privatbanken 3.jpg
Art Nouveau style in architecture is richly represented in Sandefjord.
Kirkegata 8 is an example of Jugend style architecture in Sandefjord. Sandefjord kamienica Kirkegata 8.jpg
Kirkegata 8 is an example of Jugend style architecture in Sandefjord.

Sandefjord's architecture varies from smaller tree homes to large modern complexes. [143] Sandefjord is one of few Art Nouveau towns in Norway; it is the town with the second-most Art Nouveau buildings in Norway. The major town fires of 1882, 1900 and 1915 devastated much of town and paved the way for new architecture. While neighboring towns mostly consist of wooden clapboard houses, Sandefjord is home to pastel-painted fronts, spires, turrets, and gargoyles. Jugend style structures include Saint John the Baptist's Church, Privatbanken, Gunilla's (Kongens gate 18), and an award-receiving 1915 structure at Stockfleths gate 9. [144] [145] Noble examples are also found at Christopher Hvidts Plass, including the bakery Ivar Halvorsen (built in 1900) and the former Methodist Church (1918). [141] [146]

Certain parts were left untouched by the town fires, including the street known as Bjerggata. Bjerggata is the oldest or one of the oldest parts of Sandefjord. It consists mostly of white wooden homes and is an indicator of how Sandefjord looked until the 1950s. [147] [148] Most of the homes at Bjerggata are dated to the early 1800s. [149]

Other architecture includes the Viking-inspired dragon style complex from 1899, which housed Sandefjord Spa. [147] [150] It is one of Scandinavia's largest wooden buildings. [36] [151]

Politics and government

Sandefjord is a stronghold for the Conservative Party. [152] In the Norwegian local elections of 2011, 47.9% of voters voted for the Conservative Party. The right-wing parties received a total of 70.4% of the vote in Sandefjord, compared to 51.2% nationwide. [153] [154] [155] [156] [157] The current mayor, Bjørn Ole Gleditsch, was elected in 2004 with the support of the Progress Party. Gleditsch is the wealthiest mayor to ever be elected in Norway. [158] [159] Cathrine Andersen from the Progress Party has been deputy mayor since 2015. [160]

Municipal council

With assets of nearly half a billion kroner, Bjorn Ole Gleditsch (H) is the richest mayor in Norway. Bjorn Ole Gleditsch.JPG
With assets of nearly half a billion kroner, Bjørn Ole Gleditsch (H) is the richest mayor in Norway.

The municipal council of Sandefjord is made up of 57 representatives that are elected to four-year terms. Each representative from Sandefjord proper is represented by 1,160 inhabitants, representatives from Stokke by 1,045, and Andebu by 837 residents per municipal council member. [162]

The party breakdown as of 2017 is: [163]

Sandefjord Kommunestyre 20152019
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)6
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)23
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:57

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1845749    
19516,717+796.8%
19606,984+4.0%
197031,752+354.6%
198034,758+9.5%
199035,888+3.3%
200039,317+9.6%
201043,126+9.7%
201762,622+45.2%
Sandar was annexed in 1970, while Andebu and Stokke were added in 2017. Source: Statistics Norway

According to Statistics Norway in 2017, the municipality is home to 62,622 residents. There were 2,797 vacation homes in Sandefjord as of 2018, and 2,19 people per housing unit. 69.2% are members of Church of Norway, 18% are unaffiliated and 12.8% are members of other religious communities. [2] In addition to State Churches, the city also houses various minor congregations, including an Adventist- and Methodist Church. [141]

Religious minorities with congregations in town include Pentecostals (Salem), Catholics (St. Johannes Døperen), Methodists (Metodistkirken), Seventh-day Adventists (Adventkirken), Baptists (Baptistkirken), Norwegian Lutheran Mission (Den lille gren), Jehovas Witnesses (Rikets Sal) and Muslims (Alkawther Islam Center and Sandefjord Islamic Center). [164] Baptists first established a congregation in town in the 1880s and Methodists in the 1890s. [165]

Brunstad Conference Center in Stokke. Konferansesenter1.jpg
Brunstad Conference Center in Stokke.

Brunstad Christian Church (Smith's Friends) is an evangelical non-denominational church which was established in neighboring Horten in 1905. Brunstad Conference Center is the denomination's headquarters and is located in Stokke. It is the only worldwide denomination which was established in Norway. [166] [167]

The largest minority groups in 2017 (first- and second generation immigrants) are Lithuanians (1.95%), Polish (1.93%), Iraqis (1.24%), Vietnamese (0.80%), Germans (0.71%), Swedes (0.69%), Kosovans (0.67%), Bosnians (0.64%), and Danes (0.51%). [168]

Sandefjord has a high population density of 339 people per square kilometre. The population density is particularly high in Sandefjord proper, and between E18 and the coast, the city has an equivalent population density to that of the Netherlands. The population increases significantly during summer months due to tourism. [169]

After the merge with Stokke and Andebu in 2017, Sandefjord has a population of over 63,000. This makes Sandefjord to the 11th most populous municipality in Norway. [1] [170] It is the most populous city in Vestfold County; [171] One in four people from Vestfold County are from Sandefjord, or 25.2 percent of the county population. [172]

Economy

Jotun is one of the world's largest manufacturers of paints and coating products. Jotun malingsfabrikk (77754127).jpg
Jotun is one of the world's largest manufacturers of paints and coating products.

Sandefjord is the wealthiest city in Norway. [6] [173] Important industries in Sandefjord are information technology, chemical production, tourism, navigation, ship building and fishing. [115] [174] It is home to the international airport Torp Airport, paint producer Jotun, the brewery Grans Bryggeri, the chocolate factory Hval Sjokoladefabrikk, and the engineering company Ramboll Oil & Gas. High-tech and information technology have become important industries in recent times, [175] represented by some of Norway's largest web shops: Komplett, mpx.no, and netshop.no.

The largest employer, besides the city itself, is Jotun, which was established in Sandefjord in 1926. Jotun is now one of the world's largest manufacturers of paints and coating products. [176] [177] As of February 2017, Jotun has a presence in over 100 countries and employed 9,500 employees worldwide. The Jotun Group operates four divisions, while its head office is located in Sandefjord. [29] As of 2016, Jotun had 9,800 employees including one thousand employees within Norway. It operated 37 factories in 21 countries and is represented in 120 countries through distributors, offices, and agents. It is owned by the Gleditsch family and Orkla ASA. [178]

While Jotun by far is the largest company in Vestfold County, the second-biggest company is Komplett. A web shop operating in all of Scandinavia, Komplett had a 7.3 billion NOK revenue in 2015 and had 800 employees. [179]

Seaside homes at Asnes by Sandefjordsfjord Asnes - panoramio.jpg
Seaside homes at Åsnes by Sandefjordsfjord

Sandefjord had Norway's most expensive seaside vacation homes as of 2011, with an average price of 7.2 million crowns. [180] General property values in Sandefjord appreciated 25.7 percent between 2010 and 2015. [181]

Sandefjord Whaling Museum has had over one million visitors as of 1994. Sandefjord Muzeum Wielorybnictwa 3.jpg
Sandefjord Whaling Museum has had over one million visitors as of 1994.
The bilingual interpretive sign at Gokstad Mound measures 23.5 meters, symbolizing the Gokstad Ship's length. Gokstad.jpg
The bilingual interpretive sign at Gokstad Mound measures 23.5 meters, symbolizing the Gokstad Ship's length.

Largest companies in Sandefjord based on operating income in 2015: [184]

No.Company nameOperating income
in 2015 (in NOK)
1 Jotun 16,844,327,000
2 Komplett 7,256,700,000
3Skjeggerød AS4,523,277,000
4ALSO AS2,457,643,000
5Carlsen Fritzøe AS1,543,189,000

Tourism

Sandefjord is dubbed a resort town due to its many summer visitors. [15] Sandefjord is also nicknamed the "Bathing City" due to its many beaches, islands and minor archipelagos. Beaches such as Vøra and nearby Langeby on West Island attract summer visitors from Oslo and other larger Norwegian cities. [14] Sandefjord became a bathing destination when sulphur was discovered in waters and gyttja in 1837. [171] [185]

Sandefjord is home to over two thousand vacation homes, most of which are built along the seaside. [101] Sandefjord had Norway's most expensive vacation homes as of 2012; the mean vacation home price was 7.1 million crowns in 2012. [186]

Vora attracts tourists from all of Norway, and can be crowded during summer. Sandefjord Voera.JPG
Vøra attracts tourists from all of Norway, and can be crowded during summer.

The city of Sandefjord may be best known for its bathing and many beaches. [189] [190] It is first and foremost known as a summer community. [98] [191] [192] The city lies on a low, slightly inclined strand, protected on three sides by hills, and only open towards the south where the Sandefjordsfjord is located. It is known for its great bathing and pure sea water quality. It has a country-like appearance with clean streets and quaint roads. The city is dependent on the bathing establishment during the summer season when many tourists arrive in Sandefjord. [115] The bathing season in Sandefjord generally begins on 1 June, while it ends on the last day of August. [193]

Visitors to Sandefjord Spa in the 19th century were the city's first tourists, and made Sandefjord into a popular holiday destination. [194] The city's fame as a seaside mecca dates back to 1837, when sulphur springs first were discovered in town. [150] Sandefjord has been nicknamed "Eastern Norway's vacation paradise." A majority of current tourists and vacation homeowners are from the capital of Oslo. [98]

Sandefjord is home to four hotels: Scandic Park Hotel, Hotel Kong Carl, Torp Hotel, and Clarion Collection Hotel Atlantic. [195] [196]

Skjellvika Beach Skjellvika Sandefjord.jpg
Skjellvika Beach

Culture

Number of immigrants (1st and 2nd generation) in Sandefjord by country of origin in 2017 [197]
AncestryNumber
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 1,121
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1,111
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 733
Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 504
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 429
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 423
Flag of Kosovo.svg  Kosovo 408
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 394
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 319
Flag of Syria.svg  Syria 298
Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia 250
Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines 207
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 191
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 189
Flag of the Taliban.svg  Afghanistan 182
Hjertnes Civic and Theater Center HjertnesKulturhusSandefjord.jpg
Hjertnes Civic and Theater Center
Former villa of Anders Jahre at Midtasen Villa Midtas, Anders Jahres hjem, Sandefjord kommune, Vestfold.jpg
Former villa of Anders Jahre at Midtåsen

The 9th century Gokstad Ship was discovered in Sandefjord during an 1880 excavation led by Nicolay Nicolaysen. The ship itself, which is now at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo, was built around year 910. It is the largest preserved Viking ship in Norway. [51] [198] [199] A Viking chieftain was buried at the Gokstad Mound (Gokstadhaugen), along with the 23.5-meter Gokstad Ship. Interpretive signs have been put up at the Gokstad Mound on Helgerødveien. [200] [201]

Sandefjord has four churches remaining from the Middle Ages: Høyjord Stave Church, Kodal Church, Skjee Church, and Andebu Church. While Andebu Church has Norway's oldest parish register (dated 1623), Høyjord stave church is the only stave church left in Vestfold County. Its chancel dates to the year 1100 and is the oldest part of the church. Burial mounds dating to the Viking Age can be seen around the church. [101] [202] Sandar Church by Sandefjord Station was constructed atop of the ruins of a Medieval church dated to the 13th century. The present church, however, was erected in 1792. [203] [204] [205]

Harbour Chapel a floating church Sandefjord Bryggekapellet.jpg
Harbour Chapel a floating church

Midtåsen Sculpture Park contains a collection of bronze- and marbleworks by sculptor Knut Steen, which is housed in a pine forest pavilion overlooking Sandefjord and its fjord. [206] The former estate of shipping magnate Anders Jahre is located at Midtåsen, and is now owned by the municipality. Guided tours of the villa are available. [207] The 1200 km2 (23,916 sq. ft.) villa was designed by architect Arnstein Arneberg. It is located in a 60-decare (15 acre) park. [208]

Hjertnes Civic and Theater Center is home to three auditoriums and an outdoor amphitheater. A movie theater, City Hall and library are found at Hjertnes. Concerts, opera, and other cultural events also take place at Hjertnes Civic Center. [209]

Art

The Sculpture pavilion at Midtasen Sculpture Park. Midtasen skulpturpaviljong.png
The Sculpture pavilion at Midtåsen Sculpture Park.

Sandefjord is the city in Norway with the most sculptures per inhabitant. The city is home to around 100 sculptures from over 50 artists and sculptors including Ørnulf Bast, Nils Aas, Dagfin Werenskiold, Knut Steen, Per Krogh, and others. Notable sculptures include the Whaler's Monument and the Sea Queen (“Havdronningen”) by Arnold Haukeland, which is located outside Hjertnes Civic and Theater Center. [210] Midtåsen Sculpture Park contains a collection of bronze and marble works by Knut Steen in a park and villa designed by Arnstein Arneberg. Poseidon Sculpture Park, which is located in Badeparken, features Greek mythology sculptures by Nina Sundbye. Arne Durban’s sculpture "Mother and Child" is located in the City Park (“Byparken”), while a sculpture of priest Magnus Brostrup Landstad made by Hans Holmen can be seen at Landstads plass by Sandar Church. A polar bear sculpture by Skule Waksvik is located outside Sandefjord Museum, while a whale jawbone arch is placed outside Scandic Park Hotel. A memorial to fallen sailors (Sjømannsminnesmerket) was placed outside Sandefjord Church in 1920 and was made by sculptor Gustav Lærum. [211]

The fountain at Christopher Hvidts Plass, the Thaulow fountain, was donated to the city in 1875 by Heinrich Arnold Thaulow, the city's first physician and founder of Sandefjord Spa. It is the city's oldest sculpture and its first donation. [212]

In 2017, the NGO Art for All in the World conducted a project where seven mural artists contributed. A mural by Eduardo Kobra, “Peace between nations”, can be seen behind Peter Grøns gate 2B. Street art by graffiti artist Victor Ash can be seen at Stockfeldsgate 6-8. [142]

Museums

Sandefjord is home to Europe's only museum dedicated to whaling, which is located in the city center. [32] [213] The museum was one of the first original museums in Norway when established in 1917. Today it boasts over 150,000 photographs as well as exhibits of marine animals, a restored whale catcher, and more. [54] [214] A whale catcher named Southern Actor is docked at Museum's Wharf and is a part of the Maritime Museum. It is the only whale catcher from the Modern Whaling Epoch still to be in its original working order. It was constructed by Sevilla Whaling Co. in 1950 and brought to Sandefjord in 1989. [215] [216] Museum's Wharf ("Museumsbrygga") was established in 1995 and both the Gaia ship and Southern Actor were placed at the wharf. [217]

There are six protected buildings in Sandefjord as of 2008: City Museum (Bymuseet), Maritime Museum (Sjøfartsmuséet), and the three farms Elverhøy-, Nordby-, and Auve farms. The city's oldest house, which is located at Skippergaten 6 and was built in 1667, is also one of the city's protected structures. [218] The City Museum and Maritime Museum, along with Sandefjord Museum, are the three museums found in Sandefjord. Sandefjord Museum is among the world's largest whaling museums. [182] [219] It was established in 1917 and was a gift to the city from Lars Christensen. [220]

Transportation

The NOK 1.1 billion MS Color Hybrid is the world's largest hybrid ship. Color Hybrid 2.jpg
The NOK 1.1 billion MS Color Hybrid is the world's largest hybrid ship.
Dakota Norway, Norway's only Douglas DC-3. Douglas C-53D Dakota LN-WND Dakota Norway (7450550318).jpg
Dakota Norway , Norway's only Douglas DC-3.

Sandefjord Airport Torp is one of Norway's largest airports, and is particularly known for its high number of international flights. [225] [226] Torp is Norway's second-largest airport in terms of international flights in 2003. As of 2003, Torp had over one million annual passengers, of which around 50% were for international flights. [227] Despite being located 74 miles south of Oslo, Torp is sometimes called Oslo Airport Torp. It is reached with a free shuttle bus from Sandefjord Airport Station on Vestfoldbanen.

Sandefjord Airport is a budget airline hub for airlines such as Widerøe, Ryanair, and Wizz Air. [228] Torp offers direct routes to over 30 international and domestic destinations, [229] including daily flights to European cities such as London and Amsterdam. [176] The city is served by frequent intercity trains to Oslo and onwards to Oslo Airport.

Daily ferries connect Sandefjord to Sweden. [29] [230] Color Line ferries MS Color Hybrid and Color Viking connect the town to Strömstad in Sweden. [230] Fjord Line is another ferry service connecting Sandefjord and Sweden. [231] Neighboring town of Larvik is home to daily ferry operations between Norway and Hirtshals, Denmark. [232] Scandi Line was a former ferry service operating ferries between Sandefjord and Sweden. [233] [234] Sandefjord is also home to a domestic ferry route: MF Jutøya transports people and goods to Veierland Island from Engø peninsula several times per day. [235] [236] Sandefjord is also a cruise ship destination. [129] [237]

European route E18 traverses the municipality. It is one of Norway's most important main roads, and makes the drive to Oslo approximately 90 minutes. [194]

Public transit

Only Bergen- and Oslo Airports have more international flights than Torp Airport. Sandefjord Airport, Torp from the air cropped.jpg
Only Bergen- and Oslo Airports have more international flights than Torp Airport.

Sandefjord Station is the central train station and is served by regional trains operated by Vy. The main bus station is also located by Sandefjord Station. Fast and frequent express buses from Sandefjord shuttle along E18, connecting to Kristiansand and linking key resorts in Southern Norway. [128] Trains and buses for Sandefjord leave Oslo Central Station (Oslo S) every 30 minutes, and the journey takes two hours. [239] The public transportation system in Sandefjord is known as Vestfold Kollektivtrafikk (VKT). [240]

Besides Sandefjord Station, additional railway stations include Sandefjord Airport Station and Stokke Station. Torp Express Bus Service operates buses from Sandefjord Airport to Oslo. There are free shuttle buses between Sandefjord Airport Station and Sandefjord Airport. [241]

Sandefjord Airport Torp is one of Norway's largest airports. Panoramic view of Sandefjord Lufthavn Torp Norway 2015-05-27 darker.JPG
Sandefjord Airport Torp is one of Norway's largest airports.

Sports

Sandefjord Fotball at Storstadion. Storstadion 05-july-2006.JPG
Sandefjord Fotball at Storstadion.

Bugårds Park is home to the city's largest sporting grounds and facilities, including areas for soccer, tennis, frisbee golf, handball, badminton, archery, rollerskating, horseback-riding, water sports, ice hockey, and ice skating. The 60-acre park sits by Sandefjord High School and is also home to a walking path, duck pond and designated picnic areas. The swimming center with its 2,500 m2 public pool is also located in Bugårds Park. Indoor handball courts are housed in Jotunhallen, while tennis courts are found in Pingvinhallen. [209] [242]

Sandefjord Golfbane is an 18-hole golf course located at Jåberg, 5 km (3.1 mi.) from the city center. It was designed by Peter Chamberlin. It was established in August 2009. [243] [244]

Professional sports

Sandefjord Fotball is a professional football club which plays in Tippeligaen/Eliteserien (Norwegian Premier League). The team previously played home games at Storstadion, but has played at Komplett Arena since its opening in 2007. The club reached the Norwegian First Division in 1999, the year after its foundation.

Sandefjord is noted for its strong performance in professional handball. The city is home to two top league handball teams: Sandefjord TIF and IL Runar. [245] From 1991 to 2008 Sandefjord TIF won nine Men's Premier League and another local team, Runar Håndball, won four. [246] Sandefjord TIF Handball won the Men's Premier League again in 2005–06.

In professional ice skating, Sandefjord has been the location of Norwegian Allround Championships in 1928, 1958, and 1961. [247]

Education

Sandefjord High School is the largest in Norway. SandefjordVGS2.jpg
Sandefjord High School is the largest in Norway.
Framnes Elementary School FramnesSkoleSandefjord.jpg
Framnes Elementary School

Sandefjord High School (SVGS) has about 2,000 students and is Norway's largest high school. [248] [249] It is a result of the merge between Sandefjord's four former high schools. [250] Skagerak International School is also located in town and offers English-speaking kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school. Other private schools include Moe- and Mokollen schools. Skiringssal folkehøyskole is a folk high school in Sandefjord, which is owned by Vestfold County. [171] There are six public middle schools in Sandefjord: Andebu-, Breidablikk-, Bugården-, Ranvik-, Stokke- and Varden middle schools. There are 21 public elementary schools in town. [251]

Sandefjord High School (SVGS) and its two-story 32,000 m2 (344,000 sq. ft.) facilities are located at Krokemoa near the Bugårds Park. It is a public International Baccalaureate World School, [252] [253] but also offers general academics (the college preparatory studiespesialisering of the Norwegian school system), as well as elite sports, vocational education, and more. [248] [249]

Skagerak International School is a private, English-language, International Baccalaureate World School at Framnes. [254] [255] Its education is offered to both international- and Norwegian students. Established as a High School in 1991, the school expanded to include a kindergarten as well as Primary- and Middle schools in 2000. The basis of the education is formed by the International Baccalaureate Primary Years (PYP), Middle Years (MYP) and Diploma (DP) programs. Skagerak is located in a renovated shipyard on the waterfront at Framnes. Camps and excursions are offered for all Primary- and Middle School students, as well as two or more annual trips abroad. High School students travel abroad for cultural and service-oriented trips, mostly to areas in Europe, Central Asia, and Africa. The High School is a member of UNESCO's SOUL project. [256] [257]

As of 2018, 250 students are enrolled at Pilot Flight Academy at Torp Airport. [258]

Points of interest

Whaler's Monument with Scandic Park Hotel seen on the left Hvalfangstmonumentet1.JPG
Whaler's Monument with Scandic Park Hotel seen on the left
Sandar Church was consecrated in 1792. Sandar kirke.jpg
Sandar Church was consecrated in 1792.

Notable points of interest include: [29] [261]

Rock settings at Istrehagan resemble a ship. Nearby Haugen farm is home to Vestfold's largest petroglyph site. Istrehagan, Tjolling (14550732106).jpg
Rock settings at Istrehågan resemble a ship. Nearby Haugen farm is home to Vestfold's largest petroglyph site.

Recreation

View from Tonsberg Barrel, a seamark known since the days of King Sverre. Utsikt fra Tonsberg tonne.jpg
View from Tønsberg Barrel, a seamark known since the days of King Sverre.
Entry to Knattholmen Campground on Natholmen Island. Knattholmen leirsted.jpg
Entry to Knattholmen Campground on Natholmen Island.

Sandefjord has some of Eastern Norway's largest preserved coastal recreation areas. [279] [194] This includes Yxnøy, which is one of the largest preserved nature areas along Vestfold's coast. [280] There are 20 km (12.4 mi) of coastal hiking trails on Østerøya peninsula, including to its southern tip where Tønsberg Barrel is located. Tønsberg Barrel is an old beacon mentioned in Sverris saga . The 20 km coastal path at Østerøya (East Island) is an extension of the 25 km (15.5 mi) coastal path on Vesterøya (West Island). [281] These 45 kilometers (28 mi.) of hiking trails are part of the international North Sea Trail. [282] [283] Additional hiking trails are found at Preståsen, Hjertnes Forest, Fjellvikåsen, Mokollen, Midtås, as well as the Culture Walk. [284] 100 km of hiking trails are attached to trailheads by Heisetra in rural Andebu. [285] [286] [287] Sandefjord is home to ten cross-country skiing trails (loipes). [288]

Goksjø is a 3.47 km2 (2.15 mi2) lake on the border between Sandefjord, Larvik, and Andebu. It is the third-largest lake in Vestfold County. [289] Goksjø is popular for swimming, kayaking and fishing; some of the fish species found here are Northern pike, European perch, Ide, Common dace, European eel, Salmon and Brown trout. [290] Freshwater fishing is also common by rivers such as Svartåa in Andebu and the Hagenes River in Kodal. Numedalslågen, which is considered one of Norway's best salmon fishing rivers, is located in neighboring town of Larvik. [174] [291] [292]

Sandefjord is home to numerous campgrounds, all which are located along the seaside. Campgrounds include Asnes, Langeby, Vøra, Sjøbakken, Strand Leirsted, Solløkka, and islands such as Granholmen and Natholmen. [293] [194] [294] Langeby is considered Sandefjord's best beach by Frommer's [295] and Fodor's Travel Guides, [190] and is home to Langeby Camping which offers boat- and kayak rentals. Tent camping is permitted on numerous nearby islands, including the 11-acre (4.5 ha) Hellesøya [296] and 12-acre (5 ha) Buerøya. [297] [298] Langeby lies adjacent to Vøra, a neighboring beach and campground. Vøra tends to get crowded during warm summer days due to tourism. It attracts summer vacationers from throughout Norway during warm summer months. [187] [188]

The archipelago of Stauper in the Tønsbergfjord, in-between Tjøme and Østerøya, is particularly popular during summer months. These islands are popular for swimming, kayaking, boating, and camping. It consists of four larger islands, four small islands, and a number of islets. [299] [300]

Tent camping is permitted in forests, minimum 150 meters (492 ft.) from nearest settlement. [301] [302]

Beaches

Langeby Beach attracts thousands of visitors every summer. Sandefjord Langeby.JPG
Langeby Beach attracts thousands of visitors every summer.
Camping at Langeby Beach, 1966 Langeby Camping, Sandefjord. - no-nb digifoto 20160511 00221 NB NKF P 02 E 026.jpg
Camping at Langeby Beach, 1966

Sandefjord's 146 km (90.7 mi.) of coastline is home to various beaches: [303] [304] [305]

Goksjo Lake is used for ice-skating, swimming, kayaking, and fishing. Goksjo.jpg
Goksjø Lake is used for ice-skating, swimming, kayaking, and fishing.
Between 116 -124 islands and minor islets are within city limits. Sandefjord, Norwegia 15.JPG
Between 116 -124 islands and minor islets are within city limits.

Additional beaches include Bogen (Nallberg), Brunstad, Kleivern, Korsvik, Kulerødvannet, Sandbånn and Rossnesodden (Melsomvik), Storevar, Stålerødvannet, Ertsvika, Strandvika, Albertstranda, Ormestadvika, Trollsvann, and Vårnes. [307]

Several islands with beaches are only accessible by boat, including Gokstadholmen, Lindholmen, Gåsø, Furuholmen, Gåsøkalven, Ravnø, Buerøya and Hellesøya. [304] [308]

The lake Goksjø is home to beaches such as Gubbetangen and Sandtangen. [309]

In the early 1940s, the city, under the leadership of mayor Frithjof Holtedahl, acquired the beaches Asnes on Vesterøya and Skjellvika on Østerøya. Mayor Holtedahl was also instrumental in acquiring the beach Vøra in 1943. [310]

Nature preserves

The early 1980s saw the establishment of several nature preserves in Sandefjord, including at Fokserød, Strandvika, Hemskilen, and Vøra. [311]

Sandefjord is home to 16 nature preserves as of 2017: [101] [312]

Public parks

Public parks in Sandefjord include: [313]

Poseidon Sculpture Park Badeparken Sandefjord 2.JPG
Poseidon Sculpture Park
Byparken Sandefjord, Norway - panoramio (3).jpg
Byparken

Notable residents

Business & Public Service

Lars Christensen, 1934 Lars Christensen.jpg
Lars Christensen, 1934
Bjorn Ole Gleditsch, 2010 Bjorn Ole Gleditsch.JPG
Bjørn Ole Gleditsch, 2010

The Arts

Dag Solstad, 2010 Dag Solstad.jpg
Dag Solstad, 2010
Ina Wroldsen, 2016 Ina Wroldsen (cropped).jpg
Ina Wroldsen, 2016
and Jazz musicians (and brothers)

Sport

Ronny Johnsen, 2017 Ronny Johnsen (2017-07-29 img05).jpg
Ronny Johnsen, 2017
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) was directed by two Sandefjordians. Johnny Depp in Queensland, Australia (June 2015).JPG
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) was directed by two Sandefjordians.

The city is mentioned in a number of songs, including "Ola var fra Sandefjord" (by Einar Rose, later recorded by the Johnny Band and others), "I Sandefjord by  [ no ]" (Anita Hegerland), "En sang om en sjømann" (Lillebjørn Nilsen), "Oasen 2014" (Tix), "Medvind" (Erik og Kriss), "Vanvittig Utopi II" (Gatas Parlament), "Så Det På TV" (Postgirobygget), and "Helt om natten, helt om dagen" (Lars Vaular).

Fauna

Eurasian lynx is rare but occasionally observed in Sandefjord. Lynx Nationalpark Bayerischer Wald 01.jpg
Eurasian lynx is rare but occasionally observed in Sandefjord.

Wildlife includes the Mountain hare, European badger, European beaver, Roe deer, Red deer, Moose, Red fox, European hedgehog, European pine marten, and Norway lemming. More rare but occasionally encountered are the Gray wolf, Eurasian lynx, Wolverine and Brown bear.

Wolves are extremely rare in Sandefjord, although they have been observed on numerous occasions. [341] [342] A wolf shot in neighboring Lardal in 2013 was the first wolf killed in Vestfold County in over 100 years. [343]

Common European Viper is the only venomous snake found in Norway. [344] There are an additional two non-venomous snake species found in Vestfold County: European grass snake and European smooth snake. The Slowworm is considered a lizard. [345]

See also

Related Research Articles

Vestfold Former county of Norway

Vestfold[ˈvɛ̂stfɔɫ](listen) is a traditional region, a former county and a current electoral district in Eastern Norway. In 2020 the county became part of the much larger county of Vestfold og Telemark. Located on the western shore of the Oslofjord, it bordered the previous Buskerud and Telemark counties. The county administration was located in Tønsberg, Norway's oldest city, and the largest city is Sandefjord. With the exception of the city-county of Oslo, Vestfold was the smallest county in Norway by area. Vestfold was the only county in which all municipalities had declared Bokmål to be their sole official written form of the Norwegian language.

Larvik Municipality in Vestfold og Telemark, Norway

Larvik is a town and municipality in Vestfold in Vestfold og Telemark county, Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality is the city of Larvik. The municipality of Larvik has about 46,364 inhabitants. The municipality has a 110 km coastline, only shorter than that of neighbouring Sandefjord.

Andebu Former Municipality in Vestfold, Norway

Andebu is a village in Sandefjord municipality, Vestfold County, and a former municipality. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Andebu. The village is surrounded by forests, mountains, and hills. Its nearest cities are Sandefjord and Tønsberg. The parish of Andebo was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838. On 1 January 2017, the municipality became a part of Sandefjord municipality, along with Stokke. The former municipality now makes up the northernmost part of Sandefjord municipality.

Stokke Former Municipality

Stokke is a town in Sandefjord municipality in Vestfold County, Norway. It lies in-between Sandefjord and Tønsberg, two of Vestfold's largest cities. It was a municipality from 1838 to 2016. The administrative centre of the municipality was the village of Stokke, while minor villages were Vear, Melsomvik, Storevar, and Valberg.

Østerøya Peninsula in Sandefjord, Norway

Østerøya is one of two peninsulas outside Sandefjord, Norway. It borders in west to the Mefjord and east to the Tønsbergfjord. Tønsberg Barrel is located on the southern end of the peninsula. Tønsberg Barrel is an old beacon mentioned in Sverris saga. It has been described as one of the most beautiful sites in Sandefjord.

Vesterøya

Vesterøya is one of two peninsulas outside Sandefjord, Norway. It is primarily known for its many beaches and idyllic coastal landscape, but there are also numerous trails used for hiking and biking. During the Viking Age, ocean water levels were 3–4 meters higher than today. Vesterøya was, therefore, an island surrounded by waters, but became a peninsula as water levels decreased. Vesterøya was previously known as Velløy, which derives from Vadill-øy.

Høyjord

Høyjord is a minor village in the municipality of Sandefjord, Norway, with a population of 379 as of 2005. It is famous for the Høyjord Stave Church. Høyjord, which was part of the former municipality of Andebu, was transferred along with Andebu into Sandefjord on 1 January 2017. Some Høyjord residents wanted the village transferred to neighbouring Re, but the village was ultimately merged into Sandefjord. The village is home to an elementary school, kindergarten, and various sports and youth organizations. Illestadvannet Lake is used for recreation and swimming. It is also home to the only stave church still found in Vestfold County.

Fokserød Area in Norway

Fokserød is a residential- and statistical area (grunnkrets) in Sandefjord municipality, Norway. Fokserød was originally the name of three former farms located near the current Coop Obs! megastore, relatively near Sandefjord Airport Torp. Former written forms were Foxarôyru (1346), Faxerrudt (1575), Fuxáeröd (1625), and Foxeröed (1664). It is home of Fokserød Nature Preserve, a preserved birch tree forest located by the main entry road from E18 to Torp Airport. In the 1960s, it was one of the first places in Norway where nesting Hawfinch were recorded. The nature preserve was established on June 13, 1980, and it occupies 38 decares. The nature preserve is divided in two by the road Torpveien that leads to Torp Airport and Kullerød.

Lahelle is a neighborhood and statistical area (grunnkrets) in Sandefjord municipality, Norway. It is the innermost part of the 5 km Lahellefjord. It was formerly spelled Ladhella, which includes the word lada, translating to loading or unloading vessels. The last section, -hella, most likely referred to the flat mountains. Boats were previously constructed at Lahelle, including Verven in Søndre- and Nordre Lahelle. The oldest remaining house at Lahelle is dated to 1853. A shipyard was previously located here and was utilized for repair and construction of sailing ships. The area is now made up of a mixture of homes and vacation homes. There are several piers here along with sandy beaches.

Sandefjord Station

Sandefjord Station is a railway station on the Vestfold Line in Sandefjord, Norway. The station is served with regional trains operated by Vy. The station opened as part of the Vestfold Line in 1881. Norsk Spisevognselskap took over operations of the restaurant on 1 January 1940. The first train came to Sandefjord in 1881, on its way to neighboring Larvik. In the 1950s, the steam locomotive was replaced by the less noisy electric run train.

Scandic Park Hotel Building in Sandefjord, Norway

Scandic Park Hotel is a large hotel in Sandefjord, Norway. The Park Hotel was completed in 1960 and was the largest and most luxurious hotel in Vestfold County when established. Park Hotel was built on a site that previously belonged to Sandefjord Spa. It is located next to the harbor and near the city center. It caters for conferences, business functions, and courses. Most rooms overlook the Sandefjordsfjord. The hotel houses three restaurants: Parkstuen, Kosmos, and Vinstuen. It has spa facilities, gyms, solariums, saltwater swimming pools, saunas, conference halls, and a banquet hall.

Sandar Church Church in Sandefjord, Norway

Sandar Church is the oldest church in Sandefjord, Norway in Vestfold og Telemark. The church was erected at the ruins of a mediaeval stone church from the 13th century. The current church was built in 1792 in the style of Louis XV of France. Sandar Church originally had a half-circle dome top, but the roofing was changed to the current spire in 1868.

Gokstad Mound Burial mound in Norway

The Gokstad Mound is a large burial mound at Gokstad Farm in Sandefjord in Vestfold County, Norway. It is also known as the King's Mound (Kongshaugen) and is where the 9th century Gokstad Ship was found.

Bugårdsparken

Bugårdsparken is a 60-acre park and the main sports center in Sandefjord, Norway. It is also home to a 20-acre duck pond, Bugårdsdammen, as well as designated picnic areas and hiking trails. The park is organized for 18 different sports, including ice skating, ice hockey, soccer, swimming, archery, rollerskating, golf, badminton, and more. Besides an indoor 2,500 m.2 public pool, other buildings include Jotunhallen, which is used for handball, and Pingvinhallen, which houses tennis courts. Storstadion is also located here, current home of Sandefjord BK and former home of Sandefjord Fotball (1999-2007).

Langeby

Langeby is a beach at West Island (Vesterøya) in Sandefjord, Norway. It is described as the city’s best beach by both Frommer's- and Fodor's Travel Guides. Besides its 150 metres (490 ft) sandy beach, it is home to Langeby Camping which offers boat- and kayak rentals. Langeby has a convenience store and piers used for fishing and boats. The beach has sloping rocks, a floating platform, diving boards, and showers. There is also a playground as well as a soccer field and volleyball court.

Skjellvika is a lagoon and one of the most visited beaches in Sandefjord municipality, Vestfold og Telemark, Norway. It has the most shallow waters of any beach in town, furthermore, it has one of the city’s purest sea water quality. It is situated at East Island. It lies by the Lahellefjord and is owned and maintained by the municipality of Sandefjord. It lies one kilometer south of Lahelle. The oceans off Skjellvika are used for ice-fishing during winter months.

Sandefjord Spa Spa in Norway

Sandefjord Spa, was a spa in Sandefjord, Norway, established by Heinrich Arnold Thaulow in 1837. The main building from 1899 is one of the largest wooden buildings in Norway and in the Nordic countries overall. Kurbadet was one of Europe's most visited baths in the late 1800s. Royalty and Prime Ministers from throughout Europe visited the spa in the late 1800s. It was the first spa in Sandefjord and functioned as a medical institution focusing on the treatment of symptoms for rheumatic diseases. A majority of spa visitors were from Norway, but international guests from Germany, Britain and the United States also visited Kurbadet.

Istrehågan

Istrehågan is an ancient monument at Jåberg on the Sandefjord-Larvik border in Vestfold og Telemark, Norway. It is home to some of the largest stone settings in the Nordic countries. Nearby Haugen farm in Sandefjord is home to Vestfold County's largest petroglyph site. The rock carvings at Haugen farm are Vestfold County's oldest ancient monument. It is an ancient burial ground which dates to the time of the Roman Iron Age around 1500-500 BCE. It is located two kilometers northwest of Hemskilen Nature Preserve in a forest known as Marumskogen.

Gaia ship Replica of the Gokstad ship

The Gaia ship is a replica of the 9th century Viking ship Gokstad ship. It was built in 1990 and departed Bergen for North America on 17 May 1991. It was named Hav-Cella prior to departing but was renamed Gaia by Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, President of Iceland, during a stopover in Iceland. Gaia is the name for the goddess of the Earth in Greek mythology. The Gaia Ship reached Newfoundland on 2 August and Washington DC on Leif Erikson Day, 9 October 1991. It further sailed to the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit via the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and North America.

Yxney

Yxnøy is the southernmost part of Østerøya in Sandefjord, Norway. It stretches from Nordre Truber to Ertsvika. It is one of the largest undeveloped areas found along the Vestfold coast. It is a recreational area home to several beaches, steep cliffs, forests, sloping rocks, glacial potholes, hiking trails, and Tønsberg Barrel.

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