Sanirajak

Last updated

Sanirajak
ᓴᓂᕋᔭᒃ
Hall Beach 1997-08-01.jpg
Hall Beach 1997
Canada Nunavut location map-lambert proj3.svg
Red pog.svg
Sanirajak
Canada location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Sanirajak
Coordinates: 68°47′25″N081°14′15″W / 68.79028°N 81.23750°W / 68.79028; -81.23750 Coordinates: 68°47′25″N081°14′15″W / 68.79028°N 81.23750°W / 68.79028; -81.23750
CountryCanada
Territory Nunavut
Region Qikiqtaaluk
Electoral district Amittuq
Settled1953
Government
  MayorJaypeetee Audlakiak
   MLA Amittuq Joelie Kaernerk
Area
[3]
  Total16.82 km2 (6.49 sq mi)
Elevation
[4]
8 m (26 ft)
Population
 (2016) [3]
  Total848
  Density50.4/km2 (131/sq mi)
Time zone UTC−05:00 (EST)
  Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
Canadian Postal code
Area code(s) 867

Sanirajak (Inuktitut meaning the shoreline [5] ), Syllabics: ᓴᓂᕋᔭᒃ), formerly known as Hall Beach until 27 February 2020, [6] is an Inuit settlement within the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut, Canada, approximately 69 km (43 mi) south of Igloolik.

Contents

History

It was established in 1957 during the construction of a Distant Early Warning (DEW) site. Currently the settlement is home to a North Warning System ( 68°45′44″N081°13′44″W / 68.76222°N 81.22889°W / 68.76222; -81.22889 (Hall Beach North Warning System (FOX MAIN)) ) radar facility and the Hall Beach Airport.

In 1971, seven sounding rockets of the Tomahawk Sandia type were launched from Sanirajak, some reaching altitudes of 270 km (170 mi). [7]

Demographics

Federal census population history of Sanirajakh
YearPop.±%
1976287    
1981349+21.6%
1986451+29.2%
1991 526+16.6%
1996 543+3.2%
2001 609+12.2%
2006 654+7.4%
2011 736+12.5%
2016 848+15.2%
2021 891+5.1%
Source: Statistics Canada
[8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [3] [15]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Sanirajak (Hall Beach) recorded a population of 891 living in 197 of its 205 total private dwellings, a change of

Geography

Climate

The climate is tundra (Köppen: ET), without the presence of trees and ice for most of the year. [16] Summers are very short and cool, with chilly nights. Winters are long and extremely cold, lasting most of the year with little chance of a thaw.

Climate data for Hall Beach Airport
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high humidex 0.00.4−0.62.24.021.127.928.014.04.30.3−0.928.0
Record high °C (°F)1.3
(34.3)
0.4
(32.7)
−0.5
(31.1)
3.3
(37.9)
4.4
(39.9)
21.1
(70.0)
23.3
(73.9)
24.8
(76.6)
13.5
(56.3)
4.2
(39.6)
−0.1
(31.8)
0.4
(32.7)
24.8
(76.6)
Average high °C (°F)−27.9
(−18.2)
−28.4
(−19.1)
−24.2
(−11.6)
−15.0
(5.0)
−4.9
(23.2)
3.2
(37.8)
10.1
(50.2)
7.7
(45.9)
2.1
(35.8)
−5.2
(22.6)
−14.9
(5.2)
−22.5
(−8.5)
−10.0
(14.0)
Daily mean °C (°F)−31.9
(−25.4)
−32.5
(−26.5)
−28.7
(−19.7)
−19.9
(−3.8)
−8.8
(16.2)
1.0
(33.8)
6.7
(44.1)
5.0
(41.0)
0.3
(32.5)
−8.0
(17.6)
−19.0
(−2.2)
−26.6
(−15.9)
−13.6
(7.5)
Average low °C (°F)−35.8
(−32.4)
−36.6
(−33.9)
−33.3
(−27.9)
−24.8
(−12.6)
−12.7
(9.1)
−1.3
(29.7)
3.3
(37.9)
2.2
(36.0)
−1.5
(29.3)
−10.9
(12.4)
−23.1
(−9.6)
−30.7
(−23.3)
−17.1
(1.2)
Record low °C (°F)−50.0
(−58.0)
−54.1
(−65.4)
−52.5
(−62.5)
−44.1
(−47.4)
−31.1
(−24.0)
−20.6
(−5.1)
−3.3
(26.1)
−5.1
(22.8)
−16.7
(1.9)
−33.6
(−28.5)
−42.2
(−44.0)
−53.9
(−65.0)
−54.1
(−65.4)
Record low wind chill −72.8−71.7−66.6−58.0−44.7−32.7−7.8−11.7−25.1−49.6−61.4−64.6−72.8
Average precipitation mm (inches)6.1
(0.24)
4.8
(0.19)
7.1
(0.28)
12.0
(0.47)
15.7
(0.62)
18.2
(0.72)
25.7
(1.01)
44.0
(1.73)
28.9
(1.14)
24.4
(0.96)
19.2
(0.76)
9.3
(0.37)
215.4
(8.48)
Average rainfall mm (inches)0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.2
(0.01)
2.2
(0.09)
11.2
(0.44)
25.6
(1.01)
41.3
(1.63)
17.2
(0.68)
1.5
(0.06)
0.1
(0.00)
0.0
(0.0)
99.3
(3.91)
Average snowfall cm (inches)7.3
(2.9)
6.0
(2.4)
9.2
(3.6)
14.4
(5.7)
15.4
(6.1)
7.2
(2.8)
0.1
(0.0)
3.1
(1.2)
12.0
(4.7)
27.6
(10.9)
24.0
(9.4)
10.6
(4.2)
136.8
(53.9)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm)6.75.47.49.09.78.910.613.511.014.511.68.4116.4
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm)0.00.00.00.20.85.810.612.86.10.90.30.137.5
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm)7.25.77.69.49.84.60.11.36.714.512.69.088.5
Average relative humidity (%)66.667.069.575.783.486.977.781.183.786.178.271.377.3
Source: Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010 [17] [18]

See also

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References

  1. Nunavummiut elect new municipal leaders
  2. Results for the constituency of Amittuq Archived 2013-11-13 at the Wayback Machine at Elections Nunavut
  3. 1 2 3 "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  4. Elevation at airport. Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901Z 16 July 2020 to 0901Z 10 September 2020.
  5. Hall Beach Archived 2008-10-02 at the Wayback Machine at the Atlas of Canada
  6. Tranter, Emma (February 28, 2020). "Nunavut minister signs off on name changes for two communities". Nunatsiaq News. Nortext Publishing Corporation. Nunatsiaq News. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
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  9. "1986 Census: Population - Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions" (PDF). Statistics Canada. September 1987. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
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  11. "96 Census: A National Overview - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1997. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  12. "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. August 15, 2012. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  13. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. August 20, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  14. "Corrections and updates: Population and dwelling count amendments, 2011 Census". Statistics Canada. March 4, 2014. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  15. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Nunavut". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 19, 2022.
  16. "Hall Beach, Nunavut Köppen Climate Classification (Weatherbase)". Weatherbase. Retrieved 2020-03-24.
  17. "Hall Beach A" (CSV (4222 KB)). Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment Canada. Climate ID: 2402350. Retrieved 2013-11-27.[ permanent dead link ]
  18. "Almanac Averages and Extremes for July 26". climate.weather.gc.ca. Environment and Climate Change Canada. 31 October 2011. Retrieved October 6, 2020.

Further reading