Sanremo Music Festival

Last updated

Italian Song Festival
Festival della canzone italiana
Festival di Sanremo 16 febbraio 2013.JPG
Teatro Ariston in Sanremo during the final night of the festival in 2013
Genre
  • Pop
  • folk
  • rock
  • classical
DatesFebruary
Location(s) Sanremo, Liguria, Italy
Years active1951–present
Website sanremo.rai.it

The Sanremo Music Festival, officially the Italian Song Festival (Italian : Festival della canzone italiana) and commonly known as just Festival di Sanremo (Italian:  [sanˈrɛːmo] ), is the most popular Italian song contest and awards ceremony, held annually in the city of Sanremo, Liguria. [1] [2] [3] [4] It is the longest-running annual TV music competition in the world on a national level (making it one of the world's longest-running television programmes) [5] and it is also the basis and inspiration for the annual Eurovision Song Contest. [6] [7]

Contents

Unlike other awards in Italy, the Sanremo Music Festival is a competition for new songs, not an award to previous successes (like the Premio regia televisiva  [ it ] for television, the Premio Ubu  [ it ] for stage performances, and the Premio David di Donatello for motion pictures).

The first edition of the Sanremo Music Festival, held between 29 and 31 January 1951, was broadcast by RAI's radio station Rete Rossa, and its only three participants were Nilla Pizzi, Achille Togliani, and Duo Fasano. [8] Starting from 1955, all editions of the festival have been broadcast live by the Italian TV station Rai 1. [9] [10]

From 1951 to 1976, the festival took place in the Sanremo Casino, but starting from 1977, all the following editions were held in the Teatro Ariston, [11] except in 1990, which was held at the Nuovo Mercato dei Fiori. [12]

The songs selected in the competition are in Italian (or in an Italian dialect), and the three most voted songs are awarded. Other special awards are also given, including the Critics' Award, created ad hoc by the press in 1982 to reward the quality of Mia Martini's song, and named after the singer in 1996, after her death.

The Sanremo Music Festival has often been used as a method for choosing the Italian entry for the Eurovision Song Contest. [13] [14] It has launched the careers of some of Italy's most successful musical acts, including Gigliola Cinquetti, [15] Laura Pausini, [16] Eros Ramazzotti, [17] Andrea Bocelli, [18] Giorgia, [19] Il Volo, [20] and Måneskin. [21]

Between 1953 and 1971 (except in 1956), in 1990, [22] [23] and 1991, [24] each song was sung twice by two different artists, each one using an individual orchestral arrangement, to illustrate the meaning of the festival as a composers' competition, not a singers' competition. During this era of the festival, it was custom that one version of the song was performed by a native Italian artist while the other version was performed by an international guest artist. [25] This became a way for many international artists to debut their songs on the Italian market, including Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Cher, Gloria Gaynor, Dionne Warwick, Jose Feliciano, Roberto Carlos, Paul Anka, Miriam Makeba, Bonnie Tyler, Shirley Bassey, Mungo Jerry, Kiss, Laura Branigan, and many others.

History

Origin and development

The Sanremo Casino hosted the Sanremo Music Festival between 1951 and 1976. Sanremo0005.jpg
The Sanremo Casino hosted the Sanremo Music Festival between 1951 and 1976.

In the aftermath of World War II, one of the proposals to revitalize the economy and the reputation of Sanremo was to create an annual music festival to be held in the city. [26]

In 1948 and 1949, the first two editions of the Italian Song Festival (Festival della Canzone Italiana) were held in Viareggio, from an idea developed in 1947 by Aldo Valleroni. The competition was discontinued in 1950 due to financial problems, but it became the basis for the future Sanremo Music Festival. [27] [28]

During the summer of 1950, the administrator of the Sanremo Casino, Piero Bussetti, and the conductor of the RAI orchestra, Giulio Razzi, rediscussed the idea, deciding to launch a competition among previously unreleased songs. [29] Officially titled Festival della Canzone Italiana (literally "Festival of the Italian song"), the first edition of the show was held at the Sanremo Casino on 29, 30, and 31 January 1951. [26] The final round of the competition was broadcast by Rete Rossa, the second most important RAI radio station. [30] Twenty songs took part in the competition, performed by three artists only–Nilla Pizzi, Duo Fasano, and Achille Togliani. [25]

Starting from the third edition of the festival, held in 1953, each song was performed by two different artists with different orchestras and arrangements. [31] Two years later, in 1955, the festival made its first appearance on television, since part of the final night was also broadcast by RAI's channel Programma Nazionale. [32] The last night of the show was also broadcast in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. [30]

In 1964, Gianni Ravera, who organized the 14th Sanremo Music Festival, slightly changed the rules of the contest, requiring each song to be performed once by an Italian artist and once by an international singer, [33] who was allowed to perform the song in any language. [25] The same rule was applied in the following year's contest. [34] Between 1967 and 1971, entries were not forced to be interpreted by foreign artists, but double performances were kept. Starting from 1972, each entry was sung by one artist only. [35]

The Teatro Ariston has hosted the Sanremo Music Festival since 1977. The only exception was 1990's contest, hosted at Sanremo's Palafiori. Sanremo0006.jpg
The Teatro Ariston has hosted the Sanremo Music Festival since 1977. The only exception was 1990's contest, hosted at Sanremo's Palafiori.

The competing artists were split for the first time into "Big artists" and "Young artists" during the Sanremo Music Festival 1974. The competition had one winner only, but the entries in the "Young artists" category had to go through an elimination round, while "Big artists" were directly admitted to the final round. [25]

In 1977, the Sanremo Casino, which hosted all the previous editions of the contest, was closed for renovations, therefore the show moved to the Teatro Ariston. [36] The theater later became the usual location for the annual contest, [37] hosting it every year except in 1990, when the show was held at the Nuovo Mercato dei Fiori, also known as Palafiori. [38]

In 1980, pre-recorded backing tracks replaced the orchestra, while playback performances were allowed in 1983 during the final round. [39] In 1984 and 1985, all the artists were forced to perform in playback, while live performances with the orchestra were reintroduced in 1990. [39] During the same years, several other changes were introduced in the contest. In 1982, accredited music journalists decided to create an award to recognise the best song competing in the festival. Starting from 1983, the prize was officially awarded during the event. The critics' prize was later named after Mia Martini, who was the first artist receiving it in 1982 for her entry "E non finisce mica il cielo". [40]

Moreover, starting from 1984, the separation between newcomers and established artists was marked, introducing two different competitions with separate winners. [25] In 1989, a third category, the Upcoming Artists Section, was introduced, but it was removed the following year. [41] Only in 1998 were the top three artists in the newcomer section allowed to compete in the main competition. This led to the victory of the debuting Annalisa Minetti, which generated some controversy and led to the reintroduction of completely separate competitions starting from 1999. [42]

The distinction among different categories was abolished again in 2004. [43] The following year, the contest included five different categories—Newcomers, Men, Women, Groups, and Classics. The winner of each category competed for the final victory of the contest. [44] The category Classic was abolished in 2006, [45] while starting from 2007, the festival came back to the rules used in the 1990s, with two completely separate competitions for established artists and newcomers. [46]

In 2009, a new competition, held entirely online, was introduced by the artistic director of the 59th edition of the contest, Paolo Bonolis. Titled Sanremofestival.59, [47] the contest was not held in the following years.

Winners

Big Artists section

1950s

Nilla Pizzi was the winner of the first Sanremo Festival, in 1951. Nilla Pizzi Sanremo 1951.jpg
Nilla Pizzi was the winner of the first Sanremo Festival, in 1951.
Domenico Modugno after winning the 1959 edition. Modugno won the Festival in 1958, 1959, 1962 and 1966. Sanremo 1959 Domenico Modugno.webp
Domenico Modugno after winning the 1959 edition. Modugno won the Festival in 1958, 1959, 1962 and 1966.
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1951 "Grazie dei fiori" [48]
(Saverio Seracini, Gian Carlo Testoni, Mario Panzeri)
Nilla Pizzi
1952 "Vola colomba" [48]
(Carlo Concina, Bixio Cherubini)
Nilla Pizzi
1953 "Viale d'autunno" [49]
(Giovanni D'Anzi)
Carla Boni & Flo Sandon's
1954 "Tutte le mamme" [50] [51]
(Eduardo Falcocchio, Umberto Bertini)
Giorgio Consolini & Gino Latilla
1955 "Buongiorno tristezza" [52]
(Mario Ruccione, Giuseppe Fiorelli)
Claudio Villa & Tullio Pane
1956 "Aprite le finestre" [50]
(Virgilio Panzuti, Giuseppe Perotti)
Franca Raimondi
1957 "Corde della mia chitarra" [49]
(Mario Ruccione, Giuseppe Fiorelli)
Claudio Villa & Nunzio Gallo
1958 "Nel blu dipinto di blu" [53] [54]
(Domenico Modugno, Franco Migliacci)
Domenico Modugno & Johnny Dorelli
1959 "Piove (Ciao, ciao bambina)" [50]
(Domenico Modugno, Dino Verde)
Domenico Modugno & Johnny Dorelli

1960s

Sergio Endrigo (left) with Brazilian singer Roberto Carlos after their win in 1968 Sanremo 1968 Roberto Carlos Sergio Endrigo.jpg
Sergio Endrigo (left) with Brazilian singer Roberto Carlos after their win in 1968
Gigliola Cinquetti and Belgian-Italian Patricia Carli celebrate their victory with the song "Non ho l'eta" at the 14th Sanremo Music Festival, 1 February 1964. Sanremo 1964 Gigliola Cinquetti Patricia Carli.jpg
Gigliola Cinquetti and Belgian-Italian Patricia Carli celebrate their victory with the song "Non ho l'età" at the 14th Sanremo Music Festival, 1 February 1964.
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1960 "Romantica" [55]
(Renato Rascel, Dino Verde)
Tony Dallara & Renato Rascel
1961 "Al di là" [56]
(Carlo Donida, Mogol)
Betty Curtis & Luciano Tajoli
1962 "Addio, addio" [57]
(Domenico Modugno, Franco Migliacci)
Domenico Modugno & Claudio Villa
1963 "Uno per tutte" [58]
(Tony Renis, Alberto Testa, Mogol)
Tony Renis & Emilio Pericoli
1964 "Non ho l'età" [59]
(Nicola Salerno, Mario Panzeri, Giancarlo Colonnello)
Gigliola Cinquetti & Patricia Carli
1965 "Se piangi, se ridi" [60]
(Gianny Marchetti, Bobby Solo, Mogol)
Bobby Solo & The New Christy Minstrels
1966 "Dio, come ti amo" [61]
(Domenico Modugno)
Domenico Modugno & Gigliola Cinquetti
1967 "Non pensare a me" [62]
(Eros Sciorilli, Alberto Testa)
Claudio Villa & Iva Zanicchi
1968 "Canzone per te" [63]
(Sergio Endrigo, Luis Enriquez, Sergio Bardotti)
Sergio Endrigo & Roberto Carlos
1969 "Zingara" [64]
(Enrico Riccardi, Luigi Albertelli)
Bobby Solo & Iva Zanicchi

1970s

Adriano Celentano and Claudia Mori won the 1970 edition of the festival. Mori Celentano Sanremo 1970.jpg
Adriano Celentano and Claudia Mori won the 1970 edition of the festival.
Iva Zanicchi during the 1974 edition of the festival Iva Zanicchi Sanremo 1974.jpg
Iva Zanicchi during the 1974 edition of the festival
Matia Bazar won the 1978 edition of the festival. Matia Bazar Sanremo 1978.jpg
Matia Bazar won the 1978 edition of the festival.
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1970 "Chi non lavora non fa l'amore" [65]
(Adriano Celentano, Ferdinando De Luca, Luciano Beretta, Miki Del Prete)
Adriano Celentano & Claudia Mori
1971 "Il cuore è uno zingaro" [66]
(Claudio Mattone, Franco Migliacci)
Nada & Nicola Di Bari
1972 "I giorni dell'arcobaleno" [67]
(Nicola Di Bari, Piero Pintucci, Dalmazio Masini)
Nicola Di Bari
1973 "Un grande amore e niente più" [68]
(Peppino Di Capri, Claudio Mattone, Gianni Wright, Giuseppe Faiella, Franco Califano)
Peppino Di Capri
1974 "Ciao cara, come stai?" [69]
(Cristiano Malgioglio, Italo Ianne, Claudio Fontana, Antonio Ansoldi)
Iva Zanicchi
1975 "Ragazza del sud" [70]
(Rosangela Scalabrino)
Gilda
1976 "Non lo faccio più" [71]
(Salvatore De Pasquale, Fabrizio Berlincioni, Salvatore De Pasquale, Sergio Iodice)
Peppino Di Capri
1977 "Bella da morire" [72]
(Renato Pareti, Alberto Salerno)
Homo Sapiens
1978 "...E dirsi ciao!" [73]
(Piero Cassano, Carlo Marrale, Antonella Ruggiero, Salvatore Stellitta, Giancarlo Golzi)
Matia Bazar
1979 "Amare" [74]
(Sergio Ortone, Piero Soffici, Pietro Finà)
Mino Vergnaghi

1980s

Riccardo Fogli (center), winner of the 1982 edition of the festival, with Drupi (left), Al Bano, and Romina Power (right) Podiosanremo1982.jpg
Riccardo Fogli (center), winner of the 1982 edition of the festival, with Drupi (left), Al Bano, and Romina Power (right)
Ricchi e Poveri won the festival in 1985. Ricchi e Poveri Sanremo 1985.jpg
Ricchi e Poveri won the festival in 1985.
Anna Oxa and Fausto Leali won the Festival in 1989. Anna Oxa e Fausto Leali - Festival di Sanremo 1989.jpg
Anna Oxa and Fausto Leali won the Festival in 1989.
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1980 "Solo noi" [75]
(Toto Cutugno)
Toto Cutugno
1981 "Per Elisa" [76]
(Franco Battiato, Giusto Pio, Alice Visconti)
Alice
1982 "Storie di tutti i giorni" [77]
(Riccardo Fogli, Maurizio Fabrizio, Guido Morra)
Riccardo Fogli
1983 "Sarà quel che sarà" [78]
(Maurizio Fabrizio, Roberto Ferri)
Tiziana Rivale
1984 "Ci sarà" [79]
(Dario Farina, Cristiano Minellono)
Al Bano & Romina Power
1985 "Se m'innamoro" [80]
(Dario Farina, Cristiano Minellono)
Ricchi e Poveri
1986 "Adesso tu" [81]
(Eros Ramazzotti, Piero Cassano, Adelio Cogliati)
Eros Ramazzotti
1987 "Si può dare di più" [82]
(Umberto Tozzi, Giancarlo Bigazzi, Raffaele Riefoli)
Gianni Morandi, Enrico Ruggeri & Umberto Tozzi
1988 "Perdere l'amore" [83]
(Marcello Marrocchi, Giampiero Artegiani)
Massimo Ranieri
1989 "Ti lascerò" [84]
(Franco Fasano, Fausto Leali, Franco Ciani, Fabrizio Berlincioni, Sergio Bardotti)
Anna Oxa & Fausto Leali

1990s

Giorgia won Sanremo in 1995. Giorgia - Anteprima Tour (Roma 21 Gennaio).jpg
Giorgia won Sanremo in 1995.
Ron with Tosca performing in Sanremo, 1996 Ron Tosca Sanremo 1996.jpg
Ron with Tosca performing in Sanremo, 1996
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1990 "Uomini soli" [85]
(Valerio Negrini, Roby Facchinetti)
Pooh & Dee Dee Bridgewater
1991 "Se stiamo insieme" [86]
(Riccardo Cocciante, Mogol)
Riccardo Cocciante
1992 "Portami a ballare" [87]
(Luca Barbarossa)
Luca Barbarossa
1993 "Mistero" [88]
(Enrico Ruggeri)
Enrico Ruggeri
1994 "Passerà" [89]
(Aleandro Baldi)
Aleandro Baldi
1995 "Come saprei" [90]
(Eros Ramazzotti, Vladimiro Tosetto, Adelio Cogliati, Giorgia Todrani)
Giorgia
1996 "Vorrei incontrarti fra cent'anni" [91]
(Rosalino Cellamare)
Ron with Tosca
1997 "Fiumi di parole" [92]
(Fabio Ricci, Alessandra Drusian, Carmela Di Domenico)
Jalisse
1998 "Senza te o con te" [93]
(Massimo Luca, Paola Palma)
Annalisa Minetti
1999 "Senza pietà" [94]
(Alberto Salerno, Claudio Guidetti)
Anna Oxa

2000s

Elisa was the winner of the Sanremo Festival in 2001, with the song "Luce (Tramonti a nord est)". Italian singer Elisa.jpg
Elisa was the winner of the Sanremo Festival in 2001, with the song "Luce (Tramonti a nord est)".
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2000 "Sentimento" [95]
(Fausto Mesolella, Giuseppe D'Argenzio, Ferruccio Spinetti, Domenico Ciaramella, Giuseppe Servillo)
Piccola Orchestra Avion Travel
2001 "Luce (Tramonti a nord est)" [96]
(Elisa Toffoli, Adelmo Fornaciari)
Elisa
2002 "Messaggio d'amore" [97]
(Giancarlo Golzi, Piero Cassano)
Matia Bazar
2003 "Per dire di no" [98]
(Alberto Salerno, Alessia Aquilani)
Alexia
2004 "L'uomo volante" [99]
(Marco Masini)
Marco Masini
2005 "Angelo" [100]
(Francesco Renga, Maurizio Zapatini)
Francesco Renga
2006 "Vorrei avere il becco" [101]
(Giuseppe Povia)
Povia
2007 "Ti regalerò una rosa" [102]
(Simone Cristicchi)
Simone Cristicchi
2008 "Colpo di fulmine" [103]
(Gianna Nannini)
Giò Di Tonno & Lola Ponce
2009 "La forza mia" [104]
(Paolo Carta)
Marco Carta

2010s

Francesco Gabbani won the 2017 edition of the festival, earning the right to represent Italy in the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest. Francesco Gabbani a Sanremo 2017.jpg
Francesco Gabbani won the 2017 edition of the festival, earning the right to represent Italy in the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest.
Mahmood won in the 2019 edition of the festival. Mahmood 3.jpg
Mahmood won in the 2019 edition of the festival.
List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2010 "Per tutte le volte che..." [105]
(Pierdavide Carone)
Valerio Scanu
2011 "Chiamami ancora amore" [106]
(Roberto Vecchioni, Claudio Guidetti)
Roberto Vecchioni
2012 "Non è l'inferno" [107]
(Francesco Silvestre, Enrico Palmosi, Luca Sala)
Emma
2013 "L'essenziale" [108]
(Marco Mengoni, Roberto Casalino, Francesco De Benedittis)
Marco Mengoni
2014 "Controvento" [109]
(Giuseppe Anastasi)
Arisa
2015 "Grande amore" [110]
(Francesco Boccia, Ciro Esposito)
Il Volo
2016 "Un giorno mi dirai"
(Saverio Grandi, Gaetano Curreri, Luca Chiaravalli)
Stadio
2017 "Occidentali's Karma"
(Francesco Gabbani, Filippo Gabbani, Fabio Ilacqua, Luca Chiaravalli)
Francesco Gabbani
2018 "Non mi avete fatto niente"
(Ermal Meta, Fabrizio Moro, Andrea Febo)
Ermal Meta & Fabrizio Moro
2019 "Soldi"
(Mahmood, Dardust, Charlie Charles)
Mahmood

2020s

List of winners of the Big Artists section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2020 "Fai rumore"
(Diodato, Edwyn Roberts)
Diodato
2021 "Zitti e buoni"
(Damiano David, Ethan Torchio, Thomas Raggi, Victoria De Angelis)
Måneskin
2022 "Brividi"
(Alessandro Mahmoud, Riccardo Fabbriconi, Michele Zocca)
Mahmood & Blanco

Newcomers section

Eros Ramazzotti was the first winner of the Newcomers section in 1984. He then won the Festival in 1986 competing in the Big Artists section. Ramazzotti Sanremo 1984.jpg
Eros Ramazzotti was the first winner of the Newcomers section in 1984. He then won the Festival in 1986 competing in the Big Artists section.

1980s

List of winners of the Newcomers section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1984"Terra promessa" [79]
(Eros Ramazzotti, Alberto Salerno, Renato Brioschi)
Eros Ramazzotti
1985"Niente di più" [80]
(Pietro Magnini, Cavaros)
Cinzia Corrado
1986"Grande grande amore" [81]
(Stefano D'Orazio, Maurizio Fabrizio)
Lena Biolcati
1987"La notte dei pensieri" [82]
(Luigi Albertelli, Luigi Lopez, Michele Zarrillo)
Michele Zarrillo
1988"Canta con noi" [83]
(Marco Battistini, Franco Sacco, Mino Reitano, Riccardo Bolognesi)
Future
1989"Canzoni" [84]
(Amedeo Minghi)
Mietta

1990s

Laura Pausini started her career in 1993, when she won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival with "La solitudine". LauraPausini2.jpg
Laura Pausini started her career in 1993, when she won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival with "La solitudine".
Andrea Bocelli won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival in 1994 with "Il mare calmo della sera". Bocelli.jpg
Andrea Bocelli won the Newcomers section of the Sanremo Music Festival in 1994 with "Il mare calmo della sera".
List of winners of the Newcomers section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
1990"Disperato" [111]
(Marco Masini, Giancarlo Bigazzi, Giuseppe Dati)
Marco Masini
1991"Le persone inutili" [112]
(Giuseppe Dati, Paolo Vallesi)
Paolo Vallesi
1992"Non amarmi" [113]
(Aleandro Baldi, Giancarlo Bigazzi, Marco Falagiani)
Aleandro Baldi & Francesca Alotta
1993"La solitudine" [114]
(Pietro Cremonesi, Angelo Valsiglio, Federico Cavalli)
Laura Pausini
1994"Il mare calmo della sera" [115]
(Giampietro Felisatti, Gloria Nuti, Adelmo Fornaciari)
Andrea Bocelli
1995"Le ragazze" [116]
(Claudio Mattone)
Neri per Caso
1996"Non ci sto" [117]
(Claudio Mattone)
Syria
1997"Amici come prima" [118]
(Paola Iezzi, Chiara Iezzi)
Paola e Chiara
1998"Senza te o con te" [119]
(Massimo Luca, Paola Palma)
Annalisa Minetti
1999"Oggi sono io" [120]
(Alex Britti)
Alex Britti

2000s

Jenny B won the Sanremo Music Festival in the Newcomers section in 2000. Jenny B 002.JPG
Jenny B won the Sanremo Music Festival in the Newcomers section in 2000.
Arisa, winner of the Newcomers section, performing in Sanremo in 2009. Arisa a Sanremo 2009.jpg
Arisa, winner of the Newcomers section, performing in Sanremo in 2009.
List of winners of the Newcomers section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2000"Semplice sai" [121]
(Frank Minoia, Giovanna Bersola)
Jenny B
2001"Stai con me (Forever)" [122]
(Stefano Borzi, Enzo Caterini, Sandro Nasuti)
Gazosa
2002"Doppiamente fragili" [123]
(Marco Del Freo, David Marchetti)
Anna Tatangelo
2003"Siamo tutti là fuori" [124]
(Emanuela Trane)
Dolcenera
2005"Non credo nei miracoli" [125]
(Laura Bonometti, Mario Natale)
Laura Bono
2006"Sole negli occhi" [126]
(Riccardo Maffoni)
Riccardo Maffoni
2007"Pensa" [127]
(Fabrizio Mobrici)
Fabrizio Moro
2008"L'amore" [128]
(Luca Fainello, Roberto Tini, Diego Fainello)
Sonohra
2009"Sincerità" [129]
(Giuseppe Anastasi, Maurizio Filardo, Giuseppe Mangiaracina)
Arisa

2010s

Ultimo at Sanremo in 2018 UltimoIMG 4813 (cropped).JPG
Ultimo at Sanremo in 2018
List of winners of the Newcomers section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2010"Il linguaggio della resa" [130]
(Tony Maiello, Fio Zanotti, Fabrizio Ferraguzzo, Roberto Cardelli)
Tony Maiello
2011"Follia d'amore" [131]
(Raphael Gualazzi)
Raphael Gualazzi
2012"È vero (che ci sei)" [132]
(Matteo Bassi, Emiliano Bassi)
Alessandro Casillo
2013"Mi servirebbe sapere" [133]
(Antonio Maggio)
Antonio Maggio
2014"Nu juorno buono"
(Rocco Pagliarulo, Alessandro Merli, Fabio Clemente)
Rocco Hunt
2015"Ritornerò da te" [134]
(Giovanni Caccamo)
Giovanni Caccamo
2016"Amen"
(Fabio Illacqua, Francesco Gabbani)
Francesco Gabbani
2017"Ora mai" [135]
(Raffaele Esposito, Rory Di Benedetto, Rosario Canale)
Lele
2018"Il ballo delle incertezze"
(Niccolò Moriconi)
Ultimo

2020s

List of winners of the Newcomers section, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSongArtist(s)
2020"Vai bene così"
(Leo Gassmann, Matteo Costanzo)
Leo Gassmann
2021"Polvere da sparo"
(Luca Gaudiano, Francesco Cataldo)
Gaudiano
2022 [136] "Mille Notti"
(Yuman, Francesco Cataldo)
Yuman [137]
2023"La città che odi"
(Antonio Filipelli, Bcroma, Gianmaria Volpato) [138] [139]
gIANMARIA

Other sections

List of winners of other sections, with the title of the performed song and its composers
YearSectionSongArtist(s)
1989Upcoming Artists"Bambini" [140]
(Roberto Righini, Alfredo Rizzo)
Paola Turci
2009Sanremofestival.59 (Web contest)"Buongiorno gente" [141]
(Annamaria Lequile, Luca Rustici)
Ania

"Mia Martini" Critics Award

The "Mia Martini" Critics Award, originally named the Critics Award of the Italian Song Festival and, more informally, simply the Critics Award, is a recognition given to the best song, selected by music experts (journalists and music critics) at the Sanremo Music Festival. The prize was created in 1982 specifically to award Mia Martini's interpretation of her song "E non finisce mica il cielo". [142]

Since 1996, the award has been named after Mia Martini, following her sudden death. A petition was launched by the founder of Mia Martini's official club, Chez Mimi, alongside Alba Calia and Dori Ghezzi and supported by numerous Italian artists, including Mina, Luciano Pavarotti, Fabrizio De André, Lucio Dalla, and Franco Battiato. Pippo Baudo, then-artistic director of the Sanremo Festival and the Critics Award jury, decided to name the prize after the Calabrian artist, specifically because she was the artist who, until then, had won the award the most frequently (three times), as well as having been its first winner. [143] [144]

Big Artists section and Newcomers section

Mia Martini in Sanremo, 1990. She was the first winner of the Critics Award, in 1982, and she won it again in 1989 and 1990. The award was later dedicated to her memory. Mia Martini.jpg
Mia Martini in Sanremo, 1990. She was the first winner of the Critics Award, in 1982, and she won it again in 1989 and 1990. The award was later dedicated to her memory.
Fiorella Mannoia and Paola Turci in Sanremo, 1988 Mannoia Turci Sanremo 1988.jpg
Fiorella Mannoia and Paola Turci in Sanremo, 1988
Daniele Silvestri is a three-time winner of the Critics Award. He received it in 1999, 2002, and 2019, with the songs "Aria", "Saliro", and "Argentovivo". Daniele Silvestri @ Ippodromo delle Capannelle, Roma, 2772010.jpg
Daniele Silvestri is a three-time winner of the Critics Award. He received it in 1999, 2002, and 2019, with the songs "Aria", "Salirò", and "Argentovivo".
Malika Ayane won the Critics Award in 2010 and in 2015, singing "Ricomincio da qui" and "Adesso e qui (nostalgico presente)", respectively. Malika Ayane 2.jpg
Malika Ayane won the Critics Award in 2010 and in 2015, singing "Ricomincio da qui" and "Adesso e qui (nostalgico presente)", respectively.
Raphael Gualazzi won the Critics Award in the Newcomers section in 2011, with the song "Follia d'amore". Raphael Gualazzi cropped.jpg
Raphael Gualazzi won the Critics Award in the Newcomers section in 2011, with the song "Follia d'amore".
Diodato won both the Critics Award and the Sanremo Festival first place, with the song "Fai rumore". Rocking with Antonio Diodato (cropped).jpg
Diodato won both the Critics Award and the Sanremo Festival first place, with the song "Fai rumore".
List of winners, with the title of the performed song and its composers [145]
YearBig Artists sectionNewcomers section
1982"E non finisce mica il cielo" – Mia Martini [146]
(Ivano Fossati)
1983"Vacanze romane" – Matia Bazar
(Carlo Marrale, Giancarlo Golzi)
1984"Per una bambola" – Patty Pravo
(Maurizio Monti)
"La fenice" – Santandrea
(Riccardo Cocciante, Rodolfo Santandrea)
1985"Souvenir" – Matia Bazar
(Aldo Stellita, Carlo Marrale, Sergio Cossu)
"Il viaggio" – Mango
(Giuseppe Mango)
"Bella più di me" – Cristiano De André
(Roberto Ferri, Cristiano De André, Franco Mussida)
1986"Rien ne va plus" – Enrico Ruggeri
(Enrico Ruggeri)
"Grande grande amore" – Lena Biolcati
(Stefano D'Orazio, Maurizio Fabrizio)
1987"Quello che le donne non dicono" – Fiorella Mannoia
(Enrico Ruggeri, Luigi Schiavone)
"Primo tango" – Paola Turci
(Gaio Chiocchio, Mario Castelnuovo, Roberto Righini)
1988"Le notti di maggio" – Fiorella Mannoia
(Ivano Fossati)
"Sarò bellissima" – Paola Turci
(Gaio Chiocchio, Roberto Righini)
1989"Almeno tu nell'universo" – Mia Martini
(Bruno Lauzi, Maurizio Fabrizio)
"Canzoni" – Mietta
(Amedeo Minghi)
1990"La nevicata del '56" – Mia Martini
(Carla Vistarini, Franco Califano, Massimo Cantini, Luigi Lopez)
"Disperato" – Marco Masini
(Marco Masini, Giancarlo Bigazzi, Giuseppe Dati)
1991"La fotografia" – Enzo Jannacci & Ute Lemper
(Enzo Jannacci)
"L'uomo che ride" – Timoria
(Omar Pedrini)
1992"Pe' dispietto" – Nuova Compagnia di Canto Popolare
(Corrado Sfogli, Paolo Raffone, Carlo Faiello)
"Zitti zitti (Il silenzio è d'oro)" – Aereoplanitaliani
(Alessio Bertallot, Roberto Vernetti, Francesco Nemola)
1993"Dietro la porta" – Cristiano De André
(Daniele Fossati, Cristiano De André)
"A piedi nudi" – Angela Baraldi
(Angela Baraldi, Marco Bertoni, Enrico Serotti)
1994"Signor tenente" – Giorgio Faletti
(Giorgio Faletti)
"I giardini d'Alhambra" – Baraonna
(Fulvio Caporale, Vito Caporale)
1995"Come saprei" – Giorgia
(Eros Ramazzotti, Giorgia Todrani, Vladimiro Tosetto, Adelio Cogliati)
"Le voci di dentro" – Gloria
(Giovanni Nuti, Celso Valli, Paolo Recalcati)
1996"La terra dei cachi" – Elio e le Storie Tese
(Stefano Belisari, Rocco Tanica, Cesareo, Faso)
"Al di là di questi anni" – Marina Rei [147]
(Frank Minoia, Marina Rei)
1997"E dimmi che non vuoi morire" – Patty Pravo
(Vasco Rossi, Gaetano Curreri, Roberto Ferri)
"Capelli" – Niccolò Fabi [148]
(Cecilia Dazzi, Niccolò Fabi, Riccardo Sinigallia)
1998"Dormi e sogna" – Piccola Orchestra Avion Travel
(Domenico Ciaramella, Giuseppe D'Argenzio, Fausto Mesolella, Mario Tronco, Ferruccio Spinetti, Francesco Servillo)
"Senza confini" – Eramo & Passavanti [149]
(Pino Romanelli, Bungaro)
1999"Aria" – Daniele Silvestri
(Daniele Silvestri)
"Rospo" – Quintorigo [150]
(Andrea Costa, Massimo De Leonardis, Valentino Bianchi, Gionata Costa)
2000"Replay" – Samuele Bersani
(Samuele Bersani, Giuseppe D'Onghia)
"Noël" – Lythium [151]
(Stefano Piro)
"Semplice sai" – Jenny B [151]
(Frank Minoia, Giovanna Bersola)
2001"Luce (Tramonti a nord est)" – Elisa
(Elisa Toffoli, Adelmo Fornaciari)
"Raccontami" – Francesco Renga [152]
(Francesco Renga, Umberto Iervolino)
"Il signor domani" – Roberto Angelini [152]
(Roberto Angelini)
2002"Salirò" – Daniele Silvestri [153]
(Daniele Silvestri)
"La marcia dei santi" – Archinuè [154]
(Francesco Sciacca)
2003"Tutto quello che un uomo" – Sergio Cammariere
(Roberto Kunstler, Sergio Cammariere)
"Lividi e fiori" – Patrizia Laquidara [124]
(Giuseppe Romanelli, Patrizia Laquidara)
2004"Crudele" – Mario Venuti
(Mario Venuti, Kaballà)
2005"Colpevole" – Nicola Arigliano
(Franco Fasano, Gianfranco Grottoli, Andrea Vaschetti)
2006"Un discorso in generale" – Noa, Carlo Fava & Solis String Quartet
(Carlo Fava, Gianluca Martinelli)
2007"Ti regalerò una rosa" – Simone Cristicchi
(Simone Cristicchi)
"Pensa" – Fabrizio Moro [155]
(Fabrizio Mobrici)
2008"Vita tranquilla" – Tricarico
(Francesco Tricarico)
"Para parà rara" – Frank Head [128]
(Francesco Testa, Domenico Cardella)
2009"Il paese è reale" – Afterhours
(Manuel Agnelli, Giorgio Ciccarelli, Rodrigo D'Erasmo, Enrico Gabrielli, Giorgio Prete, Roberto Dell'Era)
"Sincerità" – Arisa [156]
(Giuseppe Anastasi, Maurizio Filardo, Giuseppe Mangiaracina)
2010"Ricomincio da qui" – Malika Ayane [105]
(Malika Ayane, Pacifico, Ferdinando Arnò)
"L'uomo che amava le donne" – Nina Zilli [157]
(Maria Chiara Fraschetta, Giuseppe Rinaldi)
2011"Chiamami ancora amore" – Roberto Vecchioni [158]
(Roberto Vecchioni, Claudio Guidetti)
"Follia d'amore" – Raphael Gualazzi [159]
(Raphael Gualazzi)
2012"Un pallone" – Samuele Bersani [160]
(Samuele Bersani)
"Nella vasca da bagno del tempo" – Erica Mou [161]
(Erica Musci)
2013"La canzone mononota" – Elio e le Storie Tese [162]
(Stefano Belisari, Sergio Conforti, Davide Civaschi, Nicola Fasani)
"Il postino (amami uomo)" – Renzo Rubino [163]
(Renzo Rubino, Andrea Rodini)
2014"Invisibili" – Cristiano De André [109]
(Fabio Ferraboschi, Cristiano De André)
"Senza di te" – Zibba [164]
(Sergio Vallarino, Andrea Balestrieri)
2015"Adesso e qui (nostalgico presente)" – Malika Ayane [165]
(Malika Ayane, Pacifico, Giovanni Caccamo, Alessandra Flora)
"Ritornerò da te" – Giovanni Caccamo [166]
(Giovanni Caccamo)
2016"Cieli immensi" – Patty Pravo [167]
(Fortunato Zampaglione)
"Amen" – Francesco Gabbani [168]
(Fabio Ilacqua, Francesco Gabbani)
2017"Vietato Morire" – Ermal Meta
(Ermal Meta)
"Canzone per Federica" – Maldestro
(Antonio Prestieri)
2018"Almeno pensami" – Ron
(Lucio Dalla)
"Specchi rotti" – Alice Caioli
(Alice Caioli, Paolo Muscolino)
2019"Argentovivo" – Daniele Silvestri
(Daniele Silvestri, Tarek Iurcich, Manuel Agnelli, Fabio Rondanini)
2020"Fai rumore" – Diodato
(Antonio Diodato, Edwyn Roberts)
"Tsunami" – Eugenio in Via Di Gioia
(Eugenio Cesaro, Emanuele Via, Paolo Di Gioia, Lorenzo Federici, Dario "Dardust" Faini)
2021"Mai dire mai" – Willie Peyote
(Guglielmo "Willie Peyote" Bruno, Daniel Bestonzo, Carlo Cavalieri D'Oro, Giuseppe Petrelli)
"Lezioni di volo" – Wrongonyou
(Marco "Wrongonyou" Zitelli, Adel Al Kassem, Riccardo Sciré)
2022"Lettera di là dal mare" – Massimo Ranieri [169]
(Fabio Ilacqua)

Notable foreign duet singers

Dalida and Luigi Tenco at the Sanremo Festival, 1967 Dalida Luigi Tenco Keystone 1967.jpg
Dalida and Luigi Tenco at the Sanremo Festival, 1967
Louis Armstrong participated in the festival in 1968. Louis Armstrong restored.jpg
Louis Armstrong participated in the festival in 1968.

Notable guest artists of that time were, among others:

International successes

With the song "Nel blu dipinto di blu", Modugno won the Grammy for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year in 1959. Domenico Modugno (1958), Bestanddeelnr 909-4001.jpg
With the song "Nel blu dipinto di blu", Modugno won the Grammy for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year in 1959.

Various songs presented during the Sanremo Music Festival over the years have become international hits, including "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" and "Piove (Ciao, ciao bambina)" by Domenico Modugno. "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" spent five non-consecutive weeks atop the US Billboard Hot 100 in August and September 1958 and subsequently became Billboard's number-one single for the year. In 1959, at the inaugural Grammy Awards, "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" became the first-ever Grammy winner for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year. [172] The song "Io che non vivo (senza te)", sung at the fifteenth edition of the Sanremo Festival by Pino Donaggio, was recorded in English by Dusty Springfield under the title "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me". It became Springfield's most successful single, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart [173] and number four on the Billboard Hot 100. Elvis Presley recorded a cover version in 1970, which was a hit in both the US and the UK. Other covers have charted in the UK, Ireland, Italy, and Finland. [174] [175] The song "Non amarmi" by Aleandro Baldi and Francesca Alotta won the Newcomers section at the Sanremo Festival in 1992. It became an international hit, being covered as "No Me Ames" by American singers Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony. The song peaked at number one in the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart. [176] [177] It received a Latin Grammy nomination for Best Pop Performance by a Duo/Group with Vocals. [178] At the Billboard Latin Music Awards of 2000, the song received an award for Hot Latin Track of the Year by a Vocal Duo and two nominations for Tropical/Salsa Track of the Year and Hot Latin Track of the Year. [179] The song "Che sarà" was sung by Ricchi e Poveri and José Feliciano at the Sanremo Festival in 1971. Feliciano's recorded version was successful in Europe, the Middle East, Japan, and Latin America. [180] The Spanish version of "Che sarà" peaked at number one in Spain and Latin America. [181] The winning song of the 1982 Sanremo Festival, "Storie di tutti i giorni" by Riccardo Fogli, was sung by Dutch singer Marco Borsato, with the title "Dromen zijn deception"; his version became one of the most successful Dutch-language singles of all time. It remained at number one in the Dutch Top 40 for twelve weeks. [182] The song "Quando quando quando" by Tony Renis competed in the Sanremo Festival in 1962 and was covered by many international artists, becoming a best-selling single: Bobby Curtola's version charted at number ten in Canada, [183] Engelbert Humperdinck's reached number forty in the UK, [184] and Pat Boone's version achieved number 95 on the Billboard Hot 100. [185] [186]

The song "Con te partirò" was first performed by Andrea Bocelli at the 1995 Sanremo Festival, topping the charts in several European countries. [187] A partial English version, released in 1996 as "Time to Say Goodbye", achieved greater success, selling more than twelve million copies worldwide and making it one of the best-selling singles of all time. [188] "Non ho l'età" by Gigliola Cinquetti (1964), "Sarà perché ti amo" by Ricchi e Poveri (1981), "Maledetta Primavera" by Loretta Goggi (1981), "Felicità" by Al Bano and Romina Power (1982), "L'Italiano" by Toto Cutugno (1983), "Adesso tu" by Eros Ramazzotti (1986), "La solitudine" by Laura Pausini (1993), and "Il Mare Calmo della Sera" by Andrea Bocelli (1994) also became international hits. [189] [190] In 1994, the song "La mia storia tra le dita", which Gianluca Grignani sang at Sanremo, became a hit in South America, selling two million copies. [191] Nek sang "Laura non c'è" at the Sanremo Festival in 1997, with the song becoming a hit in Europe and Latin America; the Spanish version charted in the US and peaked at number 21 in the Billboard Hot Latin Songs Chart. [192] "Soldi" by Mahmood won the 69th Sanremo Festival and placed second in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, topping the charts in Greece, Israel, and Lithuania, and reaching the top ten in five more countries. [193] "Zitti e buoni" by Måneskin won both the Sanremo Festival and the Eurovision Song Contest in 2021, topping the charts in several European countries. It peaked at number seventeen on the UK Singles Chart and reached top ten on the Billboard Global Excl. U.S. chart. [194]

In 1966, Adriano Celentano sang "Il ragazzo della via Gluck" at the Sanremo Festival. American singer Verdelle Smith sang an English version of the song, titled "Tar and Cement", which made it to number one in Australia and became one of the year's biggest sellers. [195] The song also reached number 32 in Canada. [196] In the US, it peaked at number 38. [197] In Sweden, Anna-Lena Löfgren sang it with Swedish lyrics as "Lyckliga gatan", making the biggest hit of her career. The song was on the Svensktoppen weekly chart for fourteen weeks and won a Gold record in Sweden; in Norway, the song achieved Diamond and subsequently Platinum status. [198] The song became successful in France when it was covered by Françoise Hardy, under the title "La maison où j'ai grandi". [199]

Hosts

Pippo Baudo (center) with Claudia Koll and Anna Falchi at Sanremo 1995. Baudo hosted thirteen editions of the festival. Baudo Koll Falchi Sanremo 1995.jpg
Pippo Baudo (center) with Claudia Koll and Anna Falchi at Sanremo 1995. Baudo hosted thirteen editions of the festival.
Mike Bongiorno (center) at Sanremo 1963. Bongiorno hosted eleven editions of the festival. Presentatori Festival di Sanremo 1963.webp
Mike Bongiorno (center) at Sanremo 1963. Bongiorno hosted eleven editions of the festival.
Miguel Bose, host of the Sanremo Festival in 1988 Presentatori Festival di Sanremo 1988.jpg
Miguel Bosé, host of the Sanremo Festival in 1988
Paolo Bonolis, host of the Sanremo Festival in 2009 Paolo Bonolis a Sanremo 2009.jpg
Paolo Bonolis, host of the Sanremo Festival in 2009

The first edition of the Sanremo Music Festival was hosted by Nunzio Filogamo. He also hosted the next three editions of the musical event. In 2003, Pippo Baudo hosted for the eleventh time, matching the record previously held by Mike Bongiorno. [200] He later overtook this record, hosting the Sanremo Music Festival in 2007 and in 2008. [201] Only seven women have hosted the festival as main presenters. The first women ever to host the event alone were Lilly Lembo and Giuliana Calandra in 1961, followed by Maria Giovanna Elmi in 1978, Loretta Goggi in 1986, Raffaella Carrà in 2001, Simona Ventura in 2004, and Antonella Clerici in 2010. [202]

Full list of festival hosts: [203]

YearMain presenter(s)Co-host(s)
1951 Nunzio Filogamo
1952
1953
1954
1955 Armando PizzoMaria Teresa Ruta
1956 Fausto Tommei
1957 Nunzio Filogamo Marisa Allasio, Fiorella Mari and Nicoletta Orsomando
1958 Gianni Agus Fulvia Colombo
1959 Enzo Tortora Adriana Serra
1960 Paolo Ferrari and Enza Sampò
1961 Lilli Lembo and Giuliana Calandra
1962 Renato Tagliani Laura Efrikian and Vicky Ludovisi
1963 Mike Bongiorno Rosanna Armani, Edy Campagnoli, Giuliana Copreni and Maria Giovannini
1964 Giuliana Lojodice
1965 Grazia Maria Spina
1966 Paola Penni and Carla Maria Puccini
1967 Renata Mauro
1968 Pippo Baudo Luisa Rivelli
1969 Nuccio Costa Gabriella Farinon
1970 Enrico Maria Salerno and Ira von Fürstenberg
1971 Carlo Giuffré and Elsa Martinelli
1972 Mike Bongiorno Sylva Koscina and Paolo Villaggio
1973 Gabriella Farinon
1974 Corrado
1975 Mike Bongiorno Sabina Ciuffini
1976 Giancarlo Guardabassi
1977 Mike Bongiorno Maria Giovanna Elmi
1978 Maria Giovanna Elmi Beppe Grillo, Stefania Casini and Vittorio Salvetti
1979 Mike Bongiorno Anna Maria Rizzoli
1980 Claudio Cecchetto Roberto Benigni and Olimpia Carlisi
1981 Eleonora Vallone and Nilla Pizzi
1982 Patrizia Rossetti
1983 Andrea Giordana Isabel Russinova, Emanuela Falcetti and Anna Pettinelli
1984 Pippo Baudo Elisabetta Gardini, Edy Angelillo, Iris Peynado and Tiziana Pini
1985 Patty Brard
1986 Loretta Goggi Anna Pettinelli, Sergio Mancinelli and Mauro Micheloni
1987 Pippo Baudo Carlo Massarini
1988 Miguel Bosé and Gabriella Carlucci
1989 Rosita Celentano, Paola Dominguin, Danny Quinn and Gianmarco Tognazzi
1990 Johnny Dorelli and Gabriella Carlucci
1991 Andrea Occhipinti and Edwige Fenech
1992 Pippo Baudo Alba Parietti, Brigitte Nielsen and Milly Carlucci
1993 Lorella Cuccarini
1994 Anna Oxa
1995 Anna Falchi and Claudia Koll
1996 Sabrina Ferilli and Valeria Mazza
1997 Mike Bongiorno Piero Chiambretti and Valeria Marini
1998 Raimondo Vianello Eva Herzigová and Veronica Pivetti
1999 Fabio Fazio Laetitia Casta and Renato Dulbecco
2000 Luciano PavarottiTeo Teocoli and Inés Sastre
2001 Raffaella Carrà Enrico Papi, Massimo Ceccherini, Piero Chiambretti and Megan Gale
2002 Pippo Baudo Manuela Arcuri and Vittoria Belvedere
2003 Serena Autieri and Claudia Gerini
2004 Simona Ventura Paola Cortellesi, Maurizio Crozza and Gene Gnocchi
2005 Paolo Bonolis Antonella Clerici and Federica Felini
2006 Giorgio Panariello Ilary Blasi and Victoria Cabello
2007 Pippo Baudo and Michelle Hunziker
2008 Pippo Baudo and Piero Chiambretti Bianca Guaccero and Andrea Osvárt
2009 Paolo Bonolis and Luca Laurenti
2010 Antonella Clerici
2011 Gianni Morandi Elisabetta Canalis, Belen Rodriguez, Luca Bizzarri and Paolo Kessisoglu
2012 Ivana Mrazova and Rocco Papaleo
2013 Fabio Fazio and Luciana Littizzetto
2014
2015 Carlo Conti Arisa, Emma and Rocío Muñoz Morales
2016 Gabriel Garko, Virginia Raffaele and Mădălina Ghenea
2017 Carlo Conti and Maria De Filippi
2018 Claudio Baglioni, Michelle Hunziker and Pierfrancesco Favino
2019 Claudio Baglioni, Virginia Raffaele and Claudio Bisio
2020 Amadeus and Fiorello
2021
2022 Amadeus
2023 Amadeus and Gianni Morandi

Controversy

Povia at the 2009 Sanremo Festival Povia a Sanremo 2009.jpg
Povia at the 2009 Sanremo Festival

In 2009, the song "Luca era gay" (English: Luca was gay), written and sung by Povia, was considered by some gay rights organizations as an anti-gay song. [204] The controversy was also based on the name of the song's character: according to Aurelio Mancuso, president of the Arcigay, the name refers to Luca Tolvi, who claimed that Joseph Nicolosi cured his homosexuality. [205] Povia denied this thesis and claimed that the song is about a man he met on a train, whose real name is Massimiliano. [206] The song went on to place second at the Festival. [207]

Trivia

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sanremo Music Festival 2008</span>

The Sanremo Music Festival 2008 was the 58th Sanremo Music Festival, held at the Teatro Ariston in Sanremo. The first and the second night of the show were held on 25 and 26 February 2008, while the last three nights were held from 28 February and 1 March 2008.

The Sanremo Music Festival 2007 was the 57th Sanremo Music Festival, held at the Teatro Ariston in Sanremo. The show was held during the five nights between 27 February 2007 and 3 March 2007.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Michele Zarrillo</span> Italian singer-songwriter (born 1957)

Michele Zarrillo is an Italian singer-songwriter. He is mainly known for hits such as "Una rosa blu", "Cinque giorni", L'elefante e la farfalla and "La notte dei pensieri". In 1987 he won the Sanremo Music Festival, competing in the newcomers' section. Zarrillo took part in the competition several other times, the last time in 2017 with the song "Mani nelle mani" . He took part in Sanremo's competition 13 times, but only won once, as stated above.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sanremo Music Festival 2013</span> Televised Italian music contest

The Sanremo Music Festival 2013 was the 63rd annual Sanremo Music Festival, a televised song contest held at the Teatro Ariston in Sanremo, Liguria, between 12 and 16 February 2013 and broadcast by Rai 1. The show, presented by Fabio Fazio with Italian comedy actress Luciana Littizzetto, featured two different competitions. The Big Artists section included 14 established Italian artists, competing with two songs each. During the semi-finals, a song for each artist was eliminated as a result of votes received by public and journalists. On 16 February 2013, Marco Mengoni, based on a combination of televotes and points awarded by a jury, was announced the winner of the competition, with his song "L'essenziale". The Newcomers' section featured eight songs performed by debuting or little known artists. On 13 and 14 February 2013, music journalists and televotes determined the four finalists of the competition. The final winner of the Newcomers' section, Antonio Maggio with the song "Mi servirebbe sapere", was announced on 15 February 2013, based on points awarded by a jury and on televotes.

The Sanremo Music Festival 2006 was the 56th annual Sanremo Music Festival, held at the Teatro Ariston in Sanremo, province of Imperia, between late February and early March 2006 and broadcast by Rai 1.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Francesco Facchinetti</span> Musical artist

Francesco Facchinetti, also known as Dj Francesco or as Oz, is an Italian DJ, producer, singer, musician and TV presenter. He rose to fame as a singer during the summer of 2003, when he released his debut single, "La canzone del capitano", which became a hit in Italy. Before retiring from his music career in 2007, he released three studio albums, and he competed in the Sanremo Music Festival three times. He is the founder of Italian EDM trio "We Are PresidentS".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Daniele Silvestri</span> Italian singer-songwriter and musician (born 1968)

Daniele Silvestri is an Italian singer-songwriter and musician.

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