Saorge

Last updated

Saorge
Saorge vue generale.jpg
A general view of the village
Blason ville fr Saorge (Alpes-Maritimes).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Saorge
France location map-Regions and departements-2016.svg
Red pog.svg
Saorge
Provence-Alpes-Cote d'azur region location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Saorge
Coordinates: 43°59′18″N7°33′11″E / 43.9883°N 7.5531°E / 43.9883; 7.5531 Coordinates: 43°59′18″N7°33′11″E / 43.9883°N 7.5531°E / 43.9883; 7.5531
Country France
Region Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Department Alpes-Maritimes
Arrondissement Nice
Canton Contes
Government
  Mayor (20142020) Brigitte Bresc
Area
1
86.78 km2 (33.51 sq mi)
Population
(2016-01-01)2 [1]
470
  Density5.4/km2 (14/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
06132 /06540
Elevation319–2,680 m (1,047–8,793 ft)
(avg. 500 m or 1,600 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Saorge (Italian : Saorgio, Occitan : Saorj, Ligurian : Savurgiu) is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. Highway E74 which runs north from Menton, passes through Saorge on its way to the Col de Tende (Italian : Colle di Tenda) where it crosses into Italy.

Italian language Romance language

Italian is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family. Italian, together with Sardinian, is by most measures the closest language to Vulgar Latin of the Romance languages. Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino and Vatican City. It has an official minority status in western Istria. It formerly had official status in Albania, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro (Kotor) and Greece, and is generally understood in Corsica and Savoie. It also used to be an official language in the former Italian East Africa and Italian North Africa, where it plays a significant role in various sectors. Italian is also spoken by large expatriate communities in the Americas and Australia. Many speakers of Italian are native bilinguals of both Italian and other regional languages.

Occitan language Romance language

Occitan, also known as lenga d'òc by its native speakers, is a Romance language. It is spoken in southern France, Italy's Occitan Valleys, Monaco, and Spain's Val d'Aran; collectively, these regions are sometimes referred to as Occitania. Occitan is also spoken in the linguistic enclave of Guardia Piemontese. However, there is controversy about the unity of the language, as some think that Occitan is a macrolanguage. Others include Catalan in this family, as the distance between this language and some Occitan dialects is similar to the distance among different Occitan dialects. In fact, Catalan was considered an Occitan dialect until the end of the 19th century.

Ligurian (Romance language) Gallo-Romance language

Ligurian is a Gallo-Italic language spoken in Liguria in Northern Italy, parts of the Mediterranean coastal zone of France, Monaco and in the villages of Carloforte and Calasetta in Sardinia. It is part of the Gallo-Italic and Western Romance dialect continuum. The Genoese (Zeneize), spoken in Genoa, the capital of Liguria, is the language's prestige dialect on which the standard is based.

Contents

The region belonged to the old County of Nice. Beginning in 1388 Saorge was part of Sardinia-Piedmont. In June 1793, Sardinia defeated the armies of the First French Republic in the First Battle of Saorgio. In the Second Battle of Saorgio in April 1794 the French wrested the town from the Piedmontese. The town was returned to Sardinia-Piedmont after the overthrow of Napoleon Bonaparte and finally ceded to France in 1860.

County of Nice countship

The County of Nice is a historical region of France located around the south-eastern city of Nice, and roughly equivalent to the modern arrondissement of Nice.

Kingdom of Sardinia former Italian state (1324–1861)

The Kingdom of Sardinia was a state in Southern Europe from the early 14th until the mid-19th century.

Battle of Saorgio

The Battle of Saorgio was fought from 24 to 28 April 1794 between a French First Republic army commanded by Pierre Jadart Dumerbion and the armies of the Kingdom of Sardinia-Piedmont and the Habsburg Monarchy led by Joseph Nikolaus De Vins. It was part of a successful French offensive designed to capture strategic positions in the Maritime Alps and Ligurian Alps, and on the Mediterranean coast. Tactical control of the battle was exercised by André Masséna for the French and Michelangelo Alessandro Colli-Marchi for the Coalition. Saorge is located in France, about 70 kilometres (43 mi) northeast of Nice. At the time of the battle, the town was named Saorgio and belonged to Piedmont.

From the French Revolution to the First Empire

In 1792 the announcement of the presence of French revolutionary troops at Saint-Laurent-du-Var caused a panic in Nice. The administration of the County of Nice along with several branches of the government fled from Nice to take shelter in Saorge on 18 September. At the same time, the Sardinian troops departed Nice without fighting the French. Militia from Saorge and Fontan were recruited to fight the invading French troops. To access Saorge from the valley of the Vésubie Ruas, one must cross the pass at the Massif de l'Authion and travel down the valley of Cayros (or Cairos). Two representatives on mission asked the General Gaspard Jean-Baptiste Brunet to launch an attack against the Austro-Sardinian troops commanded by General Charles-François Thaon, Count of Saint-André in June and July 1793. The French troops were inexperienced and suffered the loss of 3,200 men. Brunet was later sentenced to death and executed.

Saint-Laurent-du-Var Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Saint-Laurent-du-Var is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region on the French Riviera.

Fontan (village) Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Fontan is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

Vésubie river in France

The Vésubie is a river in the southeast of France. It is a left tributary of the Var River in the Maritime Alps. The source is in the Mercantour National park near the border with Italy. The river flows through the town of Saint-Martin-Vésubie which is a major center for hiking. It flows into the Var near Levens. One of its tributaries is the Gordolasque.

Population

Historical population
YearPop.±%
18613,356    
18663,180−5.2%
18721,692−46.8%
18811,528−9.7%
18911,319−13.7%
19011,094−17.1%
1911954−12.8%
1921988+3.6%
1931631−36.1%
1962496−21.4%
1968508+2.4%
1975330−35.0%
1982322−2.4%
1990362+12.4%
1999396+9.4%
2008434+9.6%

See also

Related Research Articles

Alpes-Maritimes Department of France in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur

Alpes-Maritimes is a department of France located in the extreme southeast corner of the country, near the border with Italy and on the Mediterranean coast. Part of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region, it had a population of 1,080,771 in 2013.

Utelle Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Utelle is a commune about 40 miles (64 km) northeast of Nice in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

LEscarène Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

L'Escarène is an ancient commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. It was part of the historic County of Nice until 1860, named Scarena. It was a main stop along the Route de Sel during the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, between French Provence and Italian Piedmont, on the Nice-Turin road. It was built in the bottom of the valley of Spangle of Escarène at the confluence of the streams of Redebraus and Paillon.

Puget-Théniers Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Puget-Théniers is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

Tende Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Tende is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

Saint-Martin-Vésubie Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Saint-Martin-Vésubie is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes department, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in Southeastern France. Established on the edge of a glacial plate, it had a population of 1,327 in 2008. It was named after the Vésubie, a local river.

La Trinité, Alpes-Maritimes Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

La Trinité is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

Coaraze Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Coaraze is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France.

Breil-sur-Roya Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Breil-sur-Roya is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France.

Belvédère Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Belvédère is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in southeastern France. The village of Belvédère is an attractive village sitting above the river Vésubie at the entrance of the Gordolasque valley.

Bairols Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Bairols is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of south-eastern France.

Aspremont, Alpes-Maritimes Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Aspremont is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of south-eastern France.

Ascros Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Ascros is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of south-eastern France.

Venanson Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Venanson is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France.

Le Mas Commune in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Le Mas is a French commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of South-eastern France.

Royasc is a dialect bridging the gap between the Ligurian language and the Occitan language. It is spoken in Italy and France.

France–Italy border international border between Italy and France

The France–Italy border is the international boundary between France and Italy.

Battle of Saorgio (1793)

The First Battle of Saorgio saw a Republican French army commanded by Gaspard Jean-Baptiste Brunet attack the armies of the Kingdom of Sardinia-Piedmont and Habsburg Austria led by Joseph Nikolaus De Vins. The local Sardinian commander in the Maritime Alps was Charles-François Thaon, Count of Saint-André. Though the French were initially successful in this War of the First Coalition action, their main assaults against the strong defensive positions on the Massif de l'Authion and the Col de Raus failed with serious losses. Saorge is now located in France about 70 kilometres (43 mi) northeast of Nice, but in 1793 Saorgio belonged to Piedmont. In April 1794 the French seized the positions from the Austro-Sardinians in the Second Battle of Saorgio.

References

  1. "Populations légales 2016". INSEE . Retrieved 25 April 2019.