Sara Payne Hayden

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Sara Payne Hayden (born August 29, 1919) was one of the women who joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots during World War II. She was the Veterans Affairs chairwoman of the group as of 2006. [1]

Women Airforce Service Pilots U.S. Army Air Corps female auxiliary pilots

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References

  1. Tench, Megan (2006-12-07). "WWII test pilot soared beyond barriers". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 7 December 2006.