Sarapul

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Sarapul

Сарапул
Other transcription(s)
  UdmurtСарапул
Sarapul - Sedelnikov street.jpg
Sedelnikova Street in Sarapul
Flag of Sarapul.jpg
Flag
Coat of Arms of Sarapul (Udmurtia) (1781).png
Coat of arms
Location of Sarapul
Russia edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Sarapul
Location of Sarapul
Outline Map of Udmurtia.svg
Red pog.svg
Sarapul
Sarapul (Udmurt Republic)
Coordinates: 56°28′N53°48′E / 56.467°N 53.800°E / 56.467; 53.800 Coordinates: 56°28′N53°48′E / 56.467°N 53.800°E / 56.467; 53.800
Country Russia
Federal subject Udmurtia [1]
First mentioned1596
City status since1780 [2]
Area
  Total88 km2 (34 sq mi)
Elevation
80 m (260 ft)
Population
  Total101,381
  Rank 161st in 2010
  Density1,200/km2 (3,000/sq mi)
  Administratively subordinated to city of republic significance of Sarapul [1]
   Administrative center ofcity of republic significance of Sarapul [1]
  Urban okrugSarapul Urban Okrug [4]
   Administrative center ofSarapul Urban Okrug [4]
Time zone SAMT (UTC+04:00) [5]
Postal code(s) [6]
427960–427962, 427964–427968, 427970–427972, 427974, 427979
Dialing code(s) +7 34147
OKATO ID94440000000

Sarapul (Udmurt and Russian : Сара́пул) is a city and a river port in the Udmurt Republic, Russia, located on the right bank of the Kama River, 66 kilometers (41 mi) southeast of Izhevsk, the capital of the republic. Population: 101,381(2010 Census); [3] 103,141(2002 Census); [7] 110,381(1989 Census). [8]

Udmurt is a Uralic language, part of the Permic subgroup, spoken by the Udmurt natives of the Russian constituent republic of Udmurtia, where it is co-official with Russian. It is written using a Cyrillic alphabet, including five characters not used in the Russian alphabet: Ӝ/ӝ, Ӟ/ӟ, Ӥ/ӥ, Ӧ/ӧ, and Ӵ/ӵ. Together with Komi and Komi-Permyak languages, it constitutes the Permic grouping. Among outsiders, it has traditionally been referred to by its Russian exonym, Votyak. Udmurt has borrowed vocabulary from the neighboring languages Tatar and Russian.

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although, nowadays, over two decades after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia, the rise of state-specific varieties of this language tends to be strongly denied in Russia, in line with the Russian World ideology.

The classification system of the types of inhabited localities in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and some other post-Soviet states has certain peculiarities compared with the classification systems in other countries.

Contents

History

Sarapul is one of the oldest cities of the Kama region. It was first mentioned in a 1596 population audit book as the village ( selo ) of Voznesenskoye (Вознесе́нское), later known as Sarapul:[ citation needed ]in Kazansky Uyezd in the upper Kama River ... in Sarapul and Siva people fish. Apparently, here "Sarapul" is the name of a section of the river, as well as the entire area along its shores. It is believed that the name of this area comes from the word "сарапуль" (sarapul) which in Chuvash means "yellow fish", or sturgeon, which was in abundance here. Later, however, other versions of the origin of the name were considered. In particular, one of them says that the word "sarapul" formed by the merger of two words: "Sarah", which is one of the Siberian dialect means "money" and "pul" - small copper coin, and means "place of money".

It was chartered in 1780 [2] and by the end of the 18th century it grew into a merchant town with developed industry of footwear manufacturing.

Footwear garments worn on feet

Footwear refers to garments worn on the feet, which originally serves to purpose of protection against adversities of the environment, usually regarding ground textures and temperature. Footwear in the manner of shoes therefore primarily serves the purpose to ease the locomotion and prevent injuries. Secondly footwear can also be used for fashion and adornment as well as to indicate the status or rank of the person within a social structure. Socks and other hosiery are typically worn additionally between the feet and other footwear for further comfort and relief.

The city of Sarapul was one of the residence centers of the udmurt Jews, [9] [10] who spoke Udmurtish Yiddish . [9] In the lexicon of this dialect there was a noticeable number of udmurt and tatar loan words. [11] [12]

Yiddish is the historical language of the Ashkenazi Jews. It originated during the 9th century in Central Europe, providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with a High German-based vernacular fused with elements taken from Hebrew and Aramaic as well as from Slavic languages and traces of Romance languages. Yiddish is written with a fully vocalized version of the Hebrew alphabet.

The Tatar language is a Turkic language spoken by Tatars mainly located in modern Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, as well as Siberia. It should not be confused with the Crimean Tatar language which is closely related, but belongs to another, the Cuman subgroup of the Kipchak languages.

Administrative and municipal status

Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as the city of republic significance of Sarapul—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. [1] As a municipal division, the city of republic significance of Sarapul is incorporated as Sarapul Urban Okrug. [4]

City of federal subject significance is an umbrella term used to refer to a type of an administrative division of a federal subject of Russia which is equal in status to a district but is organized around a large city; occasionally with surrounding rural territories.

Economy

Currently, Sarapul is the second most significant industrial town in the republic after Izhevsk.

Izhevsk City in Udmurtia, Russia

Izhevsk is the capital city of the Udmurtia, Russia, located along the Izh River in the Western Ural Mountains. Its population is 629,455, up from 627,734 recorded in the 2010 Census, making it the nineteenth largest city in Russia and the largest in the republic.

Honors

The asteroid 26851 Sarapul was named by astronomer Eric Elst in the city's honor on June 1, 2007. [13]

Related Research Articles

Votkinsk Town in Udmurtia, Russia

Votkinsk is an industrial town in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. Population: 99,022 (2010 Census); 99,441 (2002 Census); 103,509 (1989 Census).

Udmurtia First-level administrative division of Russia

Udmurtia, or the Udmurt Republic, is a federal subject of Russia within the Volga Federal District. Its capital is the city of Izhevsk. Population: 1,521,420.

Kambarka Town in Udmurtia, Russia

Kambarka is a town and the administrative center of Kambarsky District of the Udmurt Republic, Russia, located on the Kambarka River, 116 kilometers (72 mi) southeast of Izhevsk. Population: 11,021 (2010 Census); 12,636 (2002 Census); 13,258 (1989 Census).

Alnashsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Alnashsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the south of the republic. The area of the district is 896 square kilometers (346 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Alnashi.

Debyossky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Debyossky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the northeast of the republic. The area of the district is 1,033 square kilometers (399 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Debyosy. Population: 12,665 (2010 Census); 14,085 ; 13,981 (1989 Census). The population of Debyosy accounts for 45.2% of the district's total population.

Igrinsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Igrinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the center of the republic. The area of the district is 2,266.9 square kilometers (875.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Igra. Population: 38,194 (2010 Census); 42,850 ; 45,869 (1989 Census). The population of Igra accounts for 54.3% of the district's total population.

Kambarsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Kambarsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the republic. The area of the district is 762.6 square kilometers (294.4 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Kambarka. Population: 18,106 (2010 Census); 21,243 ; 22,680 (1989 Census). The population of Kambarka accounts for 60.9% of the district's total population.

Karakulinsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Karakulinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the republic. The area of the district is 1,192.6 square kilometers (460.5 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Karakulino. Population: 12,230 (2010 Census); 13,835 ; 14,620 (1989 Census). The population of Karakulino accounts for 39.4% of the district's total population.

Kezsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Kezsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the northeast of the republic. The area of the district is 2,321 square kilometers (896 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Kez. Population: 22,911 (2010 Census); 26,446 ; 29,264 (1989 Census). The population of Kez accounts for 48.4% of the district's total population.

Kiyasovsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Kiyasovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the south of the republic. The area of the district is 821.3 square kilometers (317.1 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Kiyasovo. Population: 10,305 (2010 Census); 11,550 ; 12,603 (1989 Census). The population of Kiyasovo accounts for 31.1% of the district's total population.

Krasnogorsky District, Udmurtia District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Krasnogorsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the republic. The area of the district is 1,860.1 square kilometers (718.2 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Krasnogorskoye. Population: 10,347 (2010 Census); 12,219 ; 14,202 (1989 Census). The population of Krasnogorskoye accounts for 42.8% of the district's total population.

Malopurginsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Malopurginsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the south of the republic. The area of the district is 1,223.2 square kilometers (472.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Malaya Purga. Population: 33,058 (2010 Census); 31,558 ; 30,849 (1989 Census). The population of Malaya Purga accounts for 23.3% of the district's total population.

Sarapulsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Sarapulsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the republic. The area of the district is 1,877.6 square kilometers (724.9 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Sigayevo. Population: 24,625 (2010 Census); 24,215 ; 25,842 (1989 Census). The population of Sigayevo accounts for 22.9% of the district's total population.

Seltinsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Seltinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the west of the republic. The area of the district is 1,883.7 square kilometers (727.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Selty. Population: 11,368 (2010 Census); 13,335 ; 15,050 (1989 Census). The population of Selty accounts for 46.4% of the district's total population.

Sharkansky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Sharkansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the east of the republic. The area of the district is 1,404.5 square kilometers (542.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Sharkan. Population: 19,100 (2010 Census); 21,384 ; 21,487 (1989 Census). The population of Sharkan accounts for 34.6% of the district's total population.

Yakshur-Bodyinsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Yakshur-Bodyinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the center of the republic. The area of the district is 1,780.1 square kilometers (687.3 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Yakshur-Bodya. Population: 21,467 (2010 Census); 22,599 ; 22,964 (1989 Census). The population of Yakshur-Bodya accounts for 33.8% of the district's total population.

Uvinsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Uvinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southwestern central part of the republic. The area of the district is 2,445.4 square kilometers (944.2 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Uva. Population: 39,671 (2010 Census); 40,738 ; 40,876 (1989 Census). The population of Uva accounts for 50.4% of the district's total population.

Vavozhsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Vavozhsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the republic. The area of the district is 1,679 square kilometers (648 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Vavozh. Population: 16,351 (2010 Census); 17,323 ; 18,130 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 35.6% of the district's total population.

Yarsky District District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Yarsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the republic. The area of the district is 1,524.3 square kilometers (588.5 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Yar. Population: 15,286 (2010 Census); 18,880 ; 20,595 (1989 Census). The population of Yar accounts for 43.2% of the district's total population.

Zavyalovsky District, Udmurtia District in Udmurt Republic, Russia

Zavyalovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-five in the Udmurt Republic, Russia. It is located in the southern central part of the republic. The area of the district is 2,203.3 square kilometers (850.7 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Zavyalovo. Population: 66,000 (2010 Census); 59,145 (2002 Census); 53,388 (1989 Census). The population of Zavyalovo accounts for 13.6% of the district's total population.

References

Firefighters Depot and Signal Tower in Sarapul Sarapul Fire Tower.jpg
Firefighters Depot and Signal Tower in Sarapul

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Law #46-RZ
  2. 1 2 "Sarapul" in The New Encyclopædia Britannica . Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 15th edn., 1992, Vol. 10, p. 447.
  3. 1 2 Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  4. 1 2 3 Law #76-RZ
  5. Правительство Российской Федерации. Федеральный закон №107-ФЗ от 3 июня 2011 г. «Об исчислении времени», в ред. Федерального закона №368-ФЗ от 11 октября 2018 г. «О внесении изменений в статью 5 Федерального закона "Об исчислении времени"». Вступил в силу по истечении шестидесяти дней после дня официального опубликования (6 августа 2011 г.). Опубликован: "Российская газета", №120, 6 июня 2011 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Federal Law #107-FZ of June 31, 2011 On Calculating Time , as amended by the Federal Law #368-FZ of October 11, 2018 On Amending Article 5 of the Federal Law "On Calculating Time". Effective as of after sixty days following the day of the official publication.).
  6. Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  7. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (21 May 2004). "Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек" [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000](XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  8. "Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров" [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 via Demoscope Weekly.
  9. 1 2 Altyntsev A.V., "The Concept of Love in Ashkenazim of Udmurtia and Tatarstan", Nauka Udmurtii. 2013. № 4 (66), p. 131. (Алтынцев А.В., "Чувство любви в понимании евреев-ашкенази Удмуртии и Татарстана". Наука Удмуртии. 2013. №4. С. 131: Комментарии.) (in Russian)
  10. Пюрияйнен Д.М., "Население уездного города Сарапула во второй половине XIX - начале XX в.: социокультурный аспект"  : автореф. дис. на соиск. учен. степ. канд. ист. наук. Ижевск, 2009. С. 18. (in Russian)
  11. Goldberg-Altyntsev A.V., "A short ethnographic overview of the Ashkenazic Jews' group in Alnashsky District of Udmurt Republic". Die Sammlung der wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten der jungen jüdischen Wissenschaftler. Herausgegeben von Artur Katz, Yumi Matsuda und Alexander Grinberg. München, Dachau, 2015. S. 51.
  12. Гольдберг-Алтынцев А.В., "Краткий этнографический обзор группы ашкеназских евреев в Алнашском районе Удмуртской Республики / пер. с англ. яз. А.Й. Каца." Jewish studies in the Udmurt Republic: Online. Part 1. Edited by A. Greenberg. February 27, 2015 published. P. 3. (in Russian)
  13. NASA

Sources