Scissett

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Scissett
The Post Office in Scissett in the West Riding of Yorkshire (term West Yorkshire not recognised.) (2850866419) (2).jpg
Post office
West Yorkshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Scissett
Location within West Yorkshire
Population1,324 
OS grid reference SE242130
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HUDDERSFIELD
Postcode district HD8
Dialling code 01484
Police West Yorkshire
Fire West Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°35′16″N1°37′37″W / 53.587802°N 1.626834°W / 53.587802; -1.626834 Coordinates: 53°35′16″N1°37′37″W / 53.587802°N 1.626834°W / 53.587802; -1.626834

Scissett is a village in West Yorkshire, England. It is 14 km (8 mi) south east of Huddersfield and 16 km (10 mi) north west of Barnsley. According to the 2001 census, the village had a population of 1,324. [1] Scissett is halfway between the villages of Clayton West, Skelmanthorpe and Denby Dale on the A636 road to Wakefield.

West Yorkshire County of England

West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England. It is an inland and in relative terms upland county having eastward-draining valleys while taking in moors of the Pennines and has a population of 2.2 million. West Yorkshire came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972.

Huddersfield Town in West Yorkshire, England

Huddersfield is a large market and university town in West Yorkshire, England. It is the 11th largest town in the United Kingdom, with a population of 162,949 at the 2011 census. It lies 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Leeds and 24 miles (39 km) northeast of Manchester.

Barnsley town in South Yorkshire, England

Barnsley is a town in South Yorkshire, England, located halfway between Leeds and Sheffield. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town centre lies on the west bank of the Dearne Valley. Barnsley is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley is the largest and its administrative centre. At the 2011 Census, Barnsley had a population of 91,297.

Contents

River Dearne runs through the village, which was affected by the 2007 United Kingdom floods.

River Dearne river in the United Kingdom

The River Dearne is a river in South Yorkshire, England. It flows roughly east for more than 30 kilometres (19 mi), from its source just inside West Yorkshire, through Denby Dale, Clayton West, Darton, Barnsley, Darfield, Wath upon Dearne, Bolton on Dearne, Adwick upon Dearne and Mexborough to its confluence with the River Don at Denaby Main. Its main tributary is the River Dove, which joins it at Darfield. The river was one of those affected by the 2007 United Kingdom floods.

2007 United Kingdom floods June-July 2007 floods series in the UK

A series of large floods occurred in parts of the United Kingdom during the summer of 2007. The worst of the flooding occurred across Scotland on 14 June; East Yorkshire and the Midlands on 15 June; Yorkshire, the Midlands, Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire on 25 June; and Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire and South Wales on 28 July 2007.

Northonthorpe Mills, formerly premises of woollen manufacturers Nortonthorpe Mills, Scissett - geograph.org.uk - 256748.jpg
Northonthorpe Mills, formerly premises of woollen manufacturers

Scissett grew up around the woollen industry in the 19th century as mill owners built houses in the area for their workers. The nearby coalfields also provided employment. These industries are now gone and some of the mills are now retail units.

The Scissett Baths (and leisure centre) is one of the main attractions for the surrounding area.

Scissett has first and middle schools to provide education for children ages 4 to 13.

Scissett Youth Band began life in the village in 1978 but moved to Shelley Methodist Hall in 1991.

Sport

Scissett is home to two sports clubs, Scissett Football Club [2] and Nortonthorpe Cricket Club. Both play at Nortonthorpe sports club which was donated by the Norton family who owned the local mills at the time. When George Norton left the family home (Bagden Hall) to live in Nortonthorpe Hall he chose to outline a deed of trust, which specified that the seven and a half acres of land, which currently form the cricket and football pitch, could only be used for the recreational purposes of the community. This is largely the reason behind the cricket club being called Nortonthorpe instead of Scissett.

Etymology

The etymology is doubtful, although some sources suggest it may be from Old English side "hillside, talus, slope" (related to Old Norse siða, of similar meaning), but nothing is confirmed. The first element is uncertain. However, another source [3] claims a completely different etymology, that it was named after "Scissett Wood", itself named after a woman.

Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French. This is regarded as marking the end of the Old English era, as during this period the English language was heavily influenced by Anglo-Norman, developing into a phase known now as Middle English.

Scree Broken rock fragments at the base of steep rock faces, that has accumulated through periodic rockfall

Scree is a collection of broken rock fragments at the base of crags, mountain cliffs, volcanoes or valley shoulders that has accumulated through periodic rockfall from adjacent cliff faces. Landforms associated with these materials are often called talus deposits. Talus deposits typically have a concave upwards form, while the maximum inclination corresponds to the angle of repose of the mean debris size.

Slope In mathematics, the slope or gradient of a line describes its steepness, incline, or grade; number that describes both the direction and the steepness of the line

In mathematics, the slope or gradient of a line is a number that describes both the direction and the steepness of the line. Slope is often denoted by the letter m; there is no clear answer to the question why the letter m is used for slope, but its earliest use in English appears in O'Brien (1844) who wrote the equation of a straight line as "y = mx + b" and it can also be found in Todhunter (1888) who wrote it as "y = mx + c".

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