Scotland national football team 1920–39 results

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Scotland played their first match outside the British Isles on 26 May 1929, when they played Norway at the Brann Stadion (pictured) in Bergen. Brann stadium.jpg
Scotland played their first match outside the British Isles on 26 May 1929, when they played Norway at the Brann Stadion (pictured) in Bergen.

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international association football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It is the joint-oldest national football team in the world, alongside England, Scotland's opponents in what is now recognised as the world's first international football match, which took place at Hamilton Crescent in Glasgow in November 1872. [1]

Scotland national football team mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a constituent country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Scottish Football Association governing body of association football in Scotland

The Scottish Football Association, is the governing body of football in Scotland and has the ultimate responsibility for the control and development of football in Scotland. Members of the SFA include clubs in Scotland, affiliated national associations as well as local associations. It was formed in 1873, making it the second oldest national football association in the world. It is not to be confused with the "Scottish Football Union", which is the name that the SRU was known by until the 1920s.

Contents

Between the resumption of international football after the First World War in 1920 and the start of the Second World War in 1939, Scotland played 75 international matches, resulting in 46 victories, 12 draws and 17 defeats. Each year Scotland played in the British Home Championship, a round-robin tournament also involving England, Wales and Ireland. [2] Of the 20 tournaments played during this period, Scotland won 7 outright and 4 jointly. [2] One of Scotland's most famous victories came in 1928, when the Wembley Wizards defeated their rivals England 5–1. The team drew large crowds, with the home matches against England in 1931, 1933 and 1937 all setting world record attendances. [3] The match in April 1937 recorded an official attendance of 149,415, which still stands as the record attendance for a European international match. [3]

The British Home Championship was an annual football competition contested between the United Kingdom's four national teams: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Starting during the 1883–84 season, it is the oldest international football tournament and it was contested until the 1983–84 season, when it was abolished after 100 years.

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

Wales national football team mens association football team representing Wales

The Wales national football team represents Wales in international football. It is controlled by the Football Association of Wales (FAW), the governing body for football in Wales and the third-oldest national football association in the world.

Scotland started to play matches against opposition from beyond the British Isles between the wars, playing ad-hoc friendly matches against Austria, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland. The first FIFA World Cup was played in 1930, but none of the Home Nations, including Scotland, participated in the tournament before the Second World War. This was because their associations had been excluded from FIFA due to a disagreement regarding the status of amateur players. [4] The four associations, including Scotland, returned to the FIFA fold after the Second World War. [4]

British Isles group of islands in northwest Europe

The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and over six thousand smaller isles. They have a total area of about 315,159 km2 and a combined population of just under 70 million, and include two sovereign states, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The islands of Alderney, Jersey, Guernsey, and Sark, and their neighbouring smaller islands, are sometimes also taken to be part of the British Isles, even though, as islands off the coast of France, they do not form part of the archipelago.

Austria national football team mens national association football team representing Austria

The Austria national football team is the association football team that represents Austria in international competition and is controlled by the Austrian Football Association . Austria has qualified for seven FIFA World Cups, most recently in 1998. The country played in the UEFA European Championship for the first time in 2008, when it co-hosted the event with Switzerland, and most recently qualified in 2016.

Czechoslovakia national football team former mens national association football team representing Czechoslovakia

The Czechoslovakia national football team was the national association football team of Czechoslovakia from 1920 to 1992. The team was controlled by the Czechoslovak Football Association, and the team qualified for eight World Cups and three European Championships. It had two runner-up finishes in World Cups, in 1934 and 1962, and won the European Championship in the 1976 tournament.

Key

Results

Scotland's score is shown first in each case.

Date Venue Opponent Result Competition Scotland scorers Att. Ref.
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–1 British Home Championship Cairns 16,000 [5]
Celtic Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–0 British Home Championship Wilson, Morton, Cunningham 39,757 [5]
Hillsborough Stadium, Sheffield (A)Flag of England.svg  England 4–5 British Home Championship Miller (2), Donaldson, Wilson35,000 [5]
Pittodrie Park, Aberdeen (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–1 British Home Championship Wilson (2)20,824 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–0 British Home Championship Wilson, Cassidy 40,000 [6]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 3–0 British Home Championship Wilson, Morton, Cunningham100,000 [6]
Racecourse Ground, Wrexham (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–2 British Home Championship Archibald 10,000 [6]
Celtic Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–1 British Home Championship Wilson (2)40,000 [6]
Villa Park, Birmingham (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–0 British Home Championship Wilson33,646 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 1–0 British Home Championship Wilson30,000 [6]
Love Street, Paisley (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–0 British Home Championship Wilson (2)25,000 [6]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–2 British Home Championship Cunningham, Wilson71,000 [6]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 0–2 British Home Championship 26,000 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–0 British Home Championship Cunningham, Morris 30,000 [6]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–1 British Home Championship Taylor (own goal)37,250 [6]
Tynecastle Park, Edinburgh (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–1 British Home Championship Meiklejohn, H. Gallacher (2)25,000 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–0 British Home Championship Meiklejohn, H. Gallacher, Dunn 41,000 [6]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–0 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (2)92,000 [6]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–0 British Home Championship Duncan, McLean, Clunas 25,000 [6]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 4–0 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (3), Cunningham30,000 [6]
Old Trafford, Manchester (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–0 British Home Championship Jackson 49,000 [6]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–0 British Home Championship H. Gallacher, Jackson (2)40,500 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–0 British Home Championship Morton (2)40,000 [6]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 1–2 British Home Championship Morton111,214 [6]
Racecourse Ground, Wrexham (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–2 British Home Championship H. Gallacher, Hutton 16,000 [6]
Firhill Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 0–1 British Home Championship 55,000 [6]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 5–1 British Home Championship Jackson (2), James (3)80,868 [6]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 4–2 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (3), Dunn55,000 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 7–3 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (4), Jackson (2), James35,000 [6]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 1–0 British Home Championship Cheyne 110,512 [6]
Brann Stadion, Bergen (A)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 7–3 Friendly Rankin, Craig, Cheyne (3), Nisbet (2)4,000 [6]
Grunewaldstadion, Berlin (A)Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany 1–1 Friendly Imrie 40,000 [6]
Olympisch Stadion, Amsterdam (A)Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2–0 Friendly Fleming, Rankin24,000 [6]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 4–2 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (2), James, Gibson 25,000 [6]
Celtic Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–1 British Home Championship H. Gallacher (2), Stevenson 30,000 [6]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 2–5 British Home Championship Fleming (2)87,375 [6]
Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir, Colombes (A)Flag of France.svg  France 2–0 Friendly H. Gallacher (2)25,000 [6]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–1 British Home Championship Battles 15,000 [6]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 0–0 British Home Championship 27,000 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–0 British Home Championship Stevenson, McGrory 129,810 [7]
Hohe Warte Stadium, Vienna (A)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0–5 Friendly 40,000 [7]
Stadio Nazionale PNF, Rome (A)Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy 0–3 Friendly 25,000 [7]
Stade de Charmilles, Geneva (A)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–2 Friendly Easson, Boyd, Love 20,000 [7]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–1 British Home Championship Stevenson, McGrory, McPhail 40,000 [7]
Racecourse Ground, Wrexham (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–2 British Home Championship Stevenson, Thomson, McGrory10,860 [7]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 0–3 British Home Championship Thomas Waring, Bobby Barclay, Samuel Crooks92,180 [7]
Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir, Colombes (A)Flag of France.svg  France 3–1 Friendly Dewar (3)8,000 [7]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 4–0 British Home Championship King, McPhail (2), McGrory40,000 [7]
Tynecastle Park, Edinburgh (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–5 British Home Championship Dewar, Duncan 31,000 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–1 British Home Championship McGrory (2)134,170 [7]
Celtic Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 1–2 British Home Championship McPhail27,135 [7]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–3 British Home Championship MacFadyen, Duncan40,000 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 2–2 Friendly Meiklejohn, MacFadyen62,000 [7]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 0–3 British Home Championship 92,363 [7]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 1–2 British Home Championship P. Gallacher 39,752 [7]
Pittodrie Park, Aberdeen (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–2 British Home Championship Duncan, Napier (2)26,334 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–0 British Home Championship Duncan (2)129,693 [7]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–1 British Home Championship Dally Duncan 35,004 [7]
Tynecastle Park, Edinburgh (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–1 British Home Championship Walker, Duncan30,000 [7]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–1 British Home Championship Walker93,267 [7]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg  Germany 2–0 Friendly Delaney (2)50,000 [7]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–1 British Home Championship Napier, Munro, McCulloch 45,000 [7]
Dens Park, Dundee (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–2 British Home Championship Walker23,858 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 3–1 British Home Championship O'Donnell, McPhail (2)149,415 [7]
Praterstadion, Vienna (A)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 1–1 Friendly O'Donnell63,000 [7]
Stadion Sparta-Letna, Prague (A)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 3–1 Friendly Simpson, McPhail, Gillick 35,000 [7]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–2 British Home Championship Massie 41,800 [7]
Pittodrie Park, Aberdeen (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 1–1 British Home Championship Smith 21,878 [7]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 5–0 Friendly Black, McCulloch (2), Buchanan, Kinnear 41,000 [7]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–0 British Home Championship Walker93,267 [7]
Olympisch Stadion, Amsterdam (A)Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3–1 Friendly Black, Murphy, Walker50,000 [7]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 2–0 British Home Championship Delaney, Walker40,000 [7]
Tynecastle Park, Edinburgh (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–2 British Home Championship Delaney, Walker (2)34,800 [7]
Ibrox Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Hungary with arms (state).svg  Hungary 3–1 Friendly Walker, Black, Gillick23,000 [7]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 1–2 British Home Championship Dougal 149,269 [7]

Record by opponent

Opponent PWDLGFGA
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 3 0 2 1 3 8
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 2 2 0 0 8 1
Flag of England.svg  England 20 11 3 6 35 27
Flag of France.svg  France 2 2 0 0 5 1
Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg  Germany
Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg  Germany
2 1 1 0 3 1
Flag of Hungary with arms (state).svg  Hungary 1 1 0 0 3 1
Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 20 15 2 3 4612
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy 1 0 0 1 0 3
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2 2 0 0 5 1
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1 1 0 0 7 3
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1 1 0 0 3 2
Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 20 10 4 6 38 33
Total 75 46 12 17 156 93

British Home Championship record

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References

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