Scotland national football team 1940–59 results

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This article lists the results for the Scotland national football team between 1940 and 1959. Scotland did not play any official matches between 1940 and 1945 because competitive football was suspended for the duration of the Second World War. Several unofficial internationals, some known as Victory Internationals, were played during this time.

Scotland national football team mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a constituent country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

The term Victory International or Victory Internationals refers to two series of international football matches played by the national football teams of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales at end of both the First and Second World Wars. The matches were organised to celebrate the Victory of the Allied Powers in both wars. The term specifically refers to those matches played after the conflicts were over, making them distinct from the wartime internationals which were played during the course of the wars.

Contents

Key

Results

Scotland's score is shown first in each case.

DateVenueOpponentsScoreCompetitionScotland scorersAtt.Ref.
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 2–2 Friendly Jimmy Delaney (2)48,830 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–1 Friendly Billy Liddell (2), Jimmy Delaney 111,899 [1]
Racecourse Ground, Wrexham (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–3 British Home Championship Willie Waddell 29,568 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 0–0 British Home Championship 98,776 [1]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–1 British Home Championship Andy McLaren 98,200 [1]
Stade Heysel, Brussels (A)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1–2 Friendly Billy Steel 51,161 [1]
Stade Municipal, Luxembourg (A)Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 6–0 Friendly Bobby Flavell (2), Billy Steel (2), Andy McLaren (2)4,000 [1]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 0–2 British Home Championship 52,000 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 1–2 British Home Championship Andy McLaren 88,000 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 0–2 British Home Championship 135,376 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 2–0 Friendly Bobby Combe, Davie Duncan 70,000 [1]
Wankdorf Stadion, Bern (A)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1–2 Friendly Leslie Johnston 30,000 [1]
Stade Olympique, Colombes (A)Flag of France.svg  France 0–3 Friendly 46,032 [1]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–1 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly, Willie Waddell (2)59,911 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 3–2 British Home Championship Billy Houliston (2), Jimmy Mason 93,000 [1]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 3–1 British Home Championship Jimmy Mason, Billy Steel, Lawrie Reilly 98,188 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of France.svg  France 2–0 Friendly Billy Steel (2)125,683 [1]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 8–2 British Home Championship [note 1] Henry Morris (3), Willie Waddell (2), Billy Steel, Lawrie Reilly, Jimmy Mason 50,000 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–0 British Home Championship [note 1] John McPhail, Alec Linwood 73,782 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 0–1 British Home Championship [note 1] 133,300 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–1 Friendly Willie Bauld, Bobby Campbell, Allan Brown 123,751 [1]
Estádio Nacional, Lisbon (A)Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 2–2 Friendly Willie Bauld, Allan Brown 68,000 [1]
Stade Olympique, Colombes (A)Flag of France.svg  France 1–0 Friendly Allan Brown 35,568 [1]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 3–1 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly (2), Billy Liddell 60,000 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 6–1 British Home Championship John McPhail (2), Billy Steel (4)83,142 [1]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0–1 Friendly 68,000 [1]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 3–2 British Home Championship Bobby Johnstone, Lawrie Reilly, Billy Liddell 98,000 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 3–1 Friendly Billy Steel, Lawrie Reilly, Bobby Mitchell 75,690 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of France.svg  France 1–0 Friendly Lawrie Reilly 75,394 [2]
Stade Heysel, Brussels (A)Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5–0 Friendly George Hamilton (3), Jimmy Mason, Willie Waddell 55,135 [2]
Praterstadion, Vienna (A)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0–4 Friendly 65,000 [2]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 3–0 British Home Championship Tommy Orr, Bobby Johnstone (2)56,946 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 0–1 British Home Championship 71,272 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 1–2 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly 134,504 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States 6–0 Friendly Lawrie Reilly (3), Ian McMillan (2), Own goal 107,765 [2]
Idrætsparken, Copenhagen (A)Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2–1 Friendly Willie Thornton, Lawrie Reilly 39,000 [2]
Råsunda Stadion, Solna (A)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–3 Friendly Billy Liddell 32,122 [2]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales, 1807-1953.svg  Wales 2–1 British Home Championship Allan Brown, Billy Liddell 60,000 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 1–1 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly 65,057 [2]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 2–2 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly (2)97,000 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–2 Friendly Bobby Johnstone 83,800 [2]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 3–1 British Home Championship [note 2] Charlie Fleming (2), Jackie Henderson 58,248 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 3–3 British Home Championship [note 2] Allan Brown, Bobby Johnstone, Lawrie Reilly 71,378 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 2–4 British Home Championship [note 2] Allan Brown, Willie Ormond 134,544 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1–0 Friendly George Hamilton 25,897 [2]
Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo (A)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1–1 Friendly John Mackenzie 23,849 [2]
Olympic Stadium, Helsinki (A)Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2–1 Friendly Willie Ormond, Bobby Johnstone 21,685 [2]
Hardturm, Zurich (N)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0–1 World Cup 25,000 [2]
St. Jakob Stadium, Basel (N)Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 0–7 World Cup 34,000 [2]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 1–0 British Home Championship Paddy Buckley 53,000 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 2–2 British Home Championship Jimmy Davidson, Bobby Johnstone 46,200 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Hungary 1949-1956.svg  Hungary 2–4 Friendly Tommy Ring, Bobby Johnstone 113,146 [2]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 2–7 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly, Tommy Docherty 96,847 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 3–0 Friendly Tommy Gemmell, Billy Liddell, Lawrie Reilly 20,858 [2]
Stadion JNA, Belgrade (A)Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 2–2 Friendly Lawrie Reilly, Gordon Smith 20,000 [2]
Praterstadion, Vienna (A)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 4–1 Friendly Archie Robertson, Gordon Smith, Billy Liddell, Lawrie Reilly 65,000 [2]
Nepstadion, Budapest (A)Flag of Hungary 1949-1956.svg  Hungary 1–3 Friendly Gordon Smith 102,000 [2]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 1–2 British Home Championship Lawrie Reilly 48,000 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 2–0 British Home Championship Bobby Johnstone (2)53,887 [2]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 1–1 British Home Championship Graham Leggat 132,817 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 1–1 Friendly Alfie Conn, Sr. 80,509 [3]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 2–2 British Home Championship Willie Fernie, Lawrie Reilly 60,000 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 1–0 British Home Championship Alex Scott 62,035 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 2–0 Friendly Jackie Mudie, Sammy Baird 55,500 [3]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 1–2 British Home Championship Tommy Ring 97,520 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 4–2 World Cup qualification Jackie Mudie (3), John Hewie 88,890 [3]
St. Jakob Stadium, Basel (A)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2–1 World Cup qualification Jackie Mudie, Bobby Collins 48,000 [3]
Neckarstadion, Stuttgart (A)Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 3–1 Friendly Bobby Collins (2), Jackie Mudie 76,000 [3]
Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, Madrid (A)Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 1–4 World Cup qualification Gordon Smith 90,000 [3]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 1–1 British Home Championship Graham Leggat 50,000 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 3–2 World Cup qualification Archie Robertson, Jackie Mudie, Alex Scott 58,811 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 1–1 British Home Championship Bobby Collins 42,918 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of England.svg  England 0–4 British Home Championship 127,874 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 1–1 Friendly Jackie Mudie 54,900 [3]
Dziesieciolecia Stadion, Warsaw (A)Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 2–1 Friendly Bobby Collins (2)70,000 [3]
Arosvallen, Västerås (N)Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 1–1 World Cup Jimmy Murray 9,591 [3]
Idrottsparken, Norrköping (N)Flag of Paraguay (1954-1988).svg  Paraguay 2–3 World Cup Jackie Mudie, Bobby Collins 11,665 [3]
Eyravallen, Örebro (N)Flag of France.svg  France 1–2 World Cup Sammy Baird 13,554 [3]
Ninian Park, Cardiff (A)Flag of Wales (1953-1959).svg  Wales 3–0 British Home Championship Graham Leggat, Denis Law, Bobby Collins 59,162 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 2–2 British Home Championship David Herd, Bobby Collins 72,732 [3]
Wembley Stadium, London (A)Flag of England.svg  England 0–1 British Home Championship 98,329 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 3–2 Friendly John White, Andy Weir, Graham Leggat 103,415 [3]
Olympic Stadium, Amsterdam (A)Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2–1 Friendly Bobby Collins, Graham Leggat 55,000 [3]
Estádio José Alvalade, Lisbon (A)Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0–1 Friendly 30,000 [3]
Windsor Park, Belfast (A)Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 4–0 British Home Championship Graham Leggat, John Hewie, John White, George Mulhall 59,000 [3]
Hampden Park, Glasgow (H)Flag of Wales 2.svg  Wales 1–1 British Home Championship Graham Leggat 55,813 [3]

Record by opponent

Opponent PldWDLGFGA
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 5 1 1 3 5 8
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4 2 1 1 10 4
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2 2 0 0 5 2
Flag of England.svg  England 132 3 8 16 30
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 1 1 0 0 2 1
Flag of France.svg  France 5 3 0 2 5 5
Flag of Hungary 1949-1956.svg  Hungary
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
3 0 1 2 4 8
Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg  Ireland 4 2 1 1 11 6
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 1 1 0 0 6 0
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 1 0 0 2 1
Flag of Northern Ireland.svg  Northern Ireland 105 4 1 24 10
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2 1 1 0 2 1
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 1 0 0 1 2 3
Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 1 1 0 0 2 1
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 3 1 1 1 5 3
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg  Spain 2 1 0 1 5 6
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2 0 0 2 2 5
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 5 4 0 1 12 7
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1 1 0 0 6 0
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 1 0 0 1 0 7
Flag of Wales 2.svg  Wales 147 4 3 25 16
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 2 2 0 0 6 3
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 3 1 2 0 5 3

British Home Championship record by season

Year Placing
1946–47 3rd (joint)
1947–48 4th
1948–49 1st
1949–50 2nd
1950–51 1st
1951–52 3rd
1952–53 1st (joint)
1953–54 2nd
1954–55 2nd
1955–56 1st (joint)
1956–57 2nd
1957–58 3rd (joint)
1958–59 3rd
1959–60 1st (joint)

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 The 1950 British Home Championship also served as a 1950 FIFA World Cup qualification group. Scotland finished second in Group 1 and qualified for the 1950 FIFA World Cup. The Scottish Football Association (SFA) had declared, however, that it would only send the team to the World Cup if they had won the British Championship. Despite protests from some players that Scotland should participate in the World Cup, the SFA adhered to its position and withdrew the team from the tournament.
  2. 1 2 3 The 1954 British Home Championship also served as a 1954 FIFA World Cup qualification group. Scotland finished second in UEFA Group 3 and qualified for the 1954 FIFA World Cup.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Brown, Alan; Tossani, Gabriele (18 July 2013). "Scotland - International Matches 1946-1950". www.rsssf.com. RSSSF. Retrieved 5 February 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Brown, Alan; Tossani, Gabriele (26 September 2013). "Scotland - International Matches 1951-1955". www.rsssf.com. RSSSF. Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Brown, Alan; Tossani, Gabriele (23 January 2014). "Scotland - International Matches 1956-1960". www.rsssf.com. RSSSF. Retrieved 3 February 2014.