Scott R. Dunlap

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Scott R. Dunlap
Scott R Dunlap - Oct 1920 EH.jpg
Scott Dunlap in 1920
Born(1892-06-20)June 20, 1892
DiedMarch 30, 1970(1970-03-30) (aged 77)
Years active1915–1960

Scott R. Dunlap (June 20, 1892 March 30, 1970) was an American film producer, director, screenwriter, and actor.

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Dunlap directing Scott dunlap directing.png
Dunlap directing

Dunlap was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1892 and entered the film business in 1915. He produced 70 films between 1937 and 1960, and directed 47 films between 1919 and 1929.

In 1942, Dunlap was with Western star Buck Jones at the Cocoanut Grove fire in Boston, Massachusetts. Dunlap was hosting a party in Jones's honor at the nightclub. Jones died two days after the fire, while Dunlap was seriously hurt, but survived. [1] Dunlap died in Los Angeles in 1970.

Selected filmography

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