Scottish football attendance records

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Hampden Park, Scotland's national football stadium, holds several Scottish and European attendance records. Hampden Park.jpg
Hampden Park, Scotland's national football stadium, holds several Scottish and European attendance records.

This article lists Scottish football attendance records under the categories listed below. The highest ever attendance for a UEFA competition match was in the 1969–70 European Cup semi-final at Hampden Park, Scotland's national stadium. A record 136,505 people attended the match between Celtic and Leeds United. The attendance of 149,415 for the Scotland vs. England international match of 1937 at Hampden Park is also a European record. The attendance of 147,365 for the 1937 Scottish Cup Final between Celtic and Aberdeen at Hampden Park is a European record for a club match. Rangers' record attendance of 118,567 at Ibrox is a British record for a league match.

Association football is one of the national sports of Scotland and the most popular sport in the country. There is a long tradition of "football" games in Orkney, Lewis and southern Scotland, especially the Scottish Borders, although many of these include carrying the ball and passing by hand, and despite bearing the name "football" bear little resemblance to association football.

1969–70 European Cup football tournament

The 1969–70 European Cup football club tournament was won by Feyenoord in an extra time final victory against Celtic. It was the first time the cup was won by a Dutch club, as well as the first of four-straight years the tournament would be won by Dutch clubs. During this tournament, playoffs were abandoned in favour of away goals, or when each side had scored the same number one side was eliminated by the toss of a coin.

Celtic F.C. association football club

The Celtic Football Club is a Scottish professional football club based in Glasgow, which plays in the Scottish Premiership. The club was founded in 1887 with the purpose of alleviating poverty in the immigrant Irish population in the East End of Glasgow. They played their first match in May 1888, a friendly match against Rangers which Celtic won 5–2. Celtic established themselves within Scottish football, winning six successive league titles during the first decade of the 20th century. The club enjoyed their greatest successes during the 1960s and 70s under Jock Stein when they won nine consecutive league titles and the 1967 European Cup. Celtic have played in green and white for the entirety of its history, adopting hoops in 1903, those being used ever since.

Contents

By club

Current SPFL member clubs

This is a list of all 42 Scottish Professional Football League clubs' record match attendances at their home ground. The vast majority of these records were achieved before the advent of all-seater stadia. The cost of building all-seater grounds, and a general decline in attendances, means the present capacities of the clubs stadiums are well below their record attendances. Some records were achieved at a club's previous ground, rather than their current location. For example, Clyde's record was set at Shawfield Stadium, whilst they have since moved to Broadwood Stadium. [1] Records set while ground-sharing or at a venue other than the club's home stadium are not included. For example, Celtic were the home team when 136,505 attended their 1969–70 European Cup semi-final second leg match against Leeds United, but the match was played at Hampden Park, not Celtic Park. [2] Rangers' record attendance of 118,567 is also the British record for a league match. [3] [4]

Scottish Professional Football League mens association football league system in Scotland

The Scottish Professional Football League (SPFL) is the national men's association football league in Scotland. The league was formed in June 2013 following a merger between the Scottish Premier League and the Scottish Football League. As well as operating its league competition, which consists of the top four levels of the Scottish football league system, the SPFL also operates two domestic cup competitions, the Scottish League Cup and the Scottish Challenge Cup. While the Scottish Cup includes all the teams within the SPFL, the competition is run and organised by the Scottish Football Association.

Clyde F.C. association football club

Clyde Football Club are a Scottish semi-professional football club based in Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire who play in Scottish League One. Formed in 1877 at the River Clyde in Glasgow, since 1994 the team have played their home games at Broadwood Stadium. Their biggest accomplishment was winning the Scottish Cup on three occasions: 1939, 1955 and 1958; they reached the final a further three times, all during a long period based at Shawfield. They have not played in the top division of Scottish football since 1975.

Shawfield Stadium

Shawfield Stadium is a greyhound racing venue in the Shawfield district of the town of Rutherglen, South Lanarkshire, Scotland, located close to the boundary with Glasgow.

RankClubAttendanceStadiumOpponentCompetitionDateRefs
1 Rangers 118,567 Ibrox Park Celtic League 2 January 1939 [3] [5] [4]
2 Queen's Park 95,722 Hampden Park Rangers Scottish Cup 18 January 1930 [6]
3 Celtic 83,500 [note 1] Celtic Park Rangers League 1 January 1938 [7] [8] [9]
4 Hibernian 65,860 Easter Road Heart of Midlothian League 2 January 1950 [10]
5 Heart of Midlothian 53,396 Tynecastle Park Rangers Scottish Cup 13 February 1932 [11]
6 Clyde 52,000 Shawfield Stadium Rangers League 21 November 1908 [1]
7 Partick Thistle 49,838 Firhill Stadium Rangers League 18 February 1922 [12]
8 St Mirren 47,438 Love Street Celtic League 20 August 1949 [13]
9 Aberdeen 45,061 Pittodrie Stadium Heart of Midlothian Scottish Cup 3 March 1954 [14]
10 Dundee 43,024 Dens Park Rangers Scottish Cup 7 February 1953 [15]
11 Kilmarnock 35,995 Rugby Park Rangers Scottish Cup 10 March 1962 [16]
12 Motherwell 35,632 Fir Park Rangers Scottish Cup 12 March 1952 [17]
13 Raith Rovers 31,306 Stark's Park Heart of Midlothian Scottish Cup 7 February 1953 [18]
14 St Johnstone 29,972 Muirton Park Dundee Scottish Cup 10 February 1951 [19]
15 Hamilton Academical 28,690 Douglas Park Heart of Midlothian Scottish Cup 3 March 1937 [20]
16 Dundee United 28,000 Tannadice Park Barcelona Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 16 November 1966 [21]
17 Dunfermline Athletic 27,816 East End Park Celtic League 30 April 1968 [22]
18 Albion Rovers 27,381 Cliftonhill Rangers Scottish Cup 8 February 1936 [23]
19 Queen of the South 26,552 Palmerston Park Heart of Midlothian Scottish Cup 23 February 1952 [24]
20 Stirling Albion 26,400 Annfield Stadium Celtic Scottish Cup 14 March 1959 [25]
21 Cowdenbeath 25,586 Central Park Rangers League Cup 21 September 1949 [26]
22 Ayr United 25,225 Somerset Park Rangers League 13 September 1969 [27]
23 Greenock Morton 23,500 Cappielow Celtic League 29 April 1922 [28]
24 Falkirk 23,100 Brockville Park Celtic Scottish Cup 21 February 1953 [29]
25 East Fife 22,515 Bayview Park [note 2] Raith Rovers League 2 January 1950 [30]
26 Dumbarton 18,000 Boghead Park Raith Rovers Scottish Cup 2 March 1957 [31]
27 Alloa Athletic 13,000 Recreation Park Dunfermline Athletic Scottish Cup 26 February 1939 [32]
28 Arbroath 13,510 Gayfield Park Rangers Scottish Cup 22 February 1952 [33]
29 Elgin City 12,608 Borough Briggs Arbroath Scottish Cup 17 February 1968 [34]
30 Stenhousemuir 12,500 Ochilview Park East Fife Scottish Cup 11 March 1950 [35]
31 Forfar Athletic 10,780 Station Park Rangers Scottish Cup 7 February 1970 [36]
32 Livingston 10,112 Almondvale Stadium Rangers League 27 October 2001 [37]
33 Airdrieonians 9,044 Excelsior Stadium Rangers Scottish League One 23 August 2013 [38]
34 Montrose 8,983 Links Park Dundee Scottish Cup 17 March 1973 [39]
35 Peterhead 8,643Recreation ParkRaith Rovers Scottish Cup 25 February 1987 [40]
36 Brechin City 8,122 Glebe Park Aberdeen Scottish Cup 3 February 1973 [41]
37 Ross County 8,000 Victoria Park Rangers Scottish Cup 28 February 1966 [42]
38 Inverness CT 7,711 Caledonian Stadium Rangers League 4 August 2007 [43] [note 3]
39 Stranraer 6,500 Stair Park Rangers Scottish Cup 24 January 1948 [44]
40 Edinburgh City 2,522 Meadowbank Stadium Hibernian Friendly match 7 July 2016 [45]
41 Annan Athletic 2,517 Galabank Stadium Rangers League 15 September 2012 [46]
42 Cove Rangers 2,100Allan Park Deveronvale League [47]

Former SPFL member clubs

ClubAttendanceStadiumOpponentCompetitionDateRefs
Third Lanark 45,455 Cathkin Park Rangers Scottish Cup 27 February 1954 [48]
Airdrieonians 24,000 Broomfield Park Heart of Midlothian Scottish Cup 8 March 1952 [49]
Clydebank 14,900 Kilbowie Park Hibernian Scottish Cup 10 February 1965 [50]
Berwick Rangers 13,365 Shielfield Park Rangers Scottish Cup 28 January 1967 [51]
East Stirlingshire 12,000 Firs Park Partick Thistle Scottish Cup 19 February 1921 [52]
Gretna 3,000 Raydale Park Dundee United Scottish Cup 17 January 2005 [53] [note 4]

Cup finals

The attendance of 147,365 for the 1937 Scottish Cup Final between Celtic and Aberdeen at Hampden Park is a European record for a club match. [54] [4] [2]

While less than 50% of the all-time record crowds at Hampden, the attendance of 72,069 at the 1989 Scottish Cup Final [55] has become a landmark figure as no match in Scotland has come close to matching it since, owing to subsequent stadium modernisation which left no venue with a greater capacity. [56]

The 1989 Scottish Cup Final was played between Celtic and Rangers at Hampden Park on 20 May 1989.

CompetitionAttendanceStadiumMatchDateRefs
Scottish Cup 147,365 Hampden Park Celtic v Aberdeen 24 April 1937 [2] [4]
League Cup 107,609 [note 5] [57] Hampden Park Celtic v Rangers 25 October 1965 [58]
Southern League Cup [note 6] [59] [60] 135,000 Hampden Park Aberdeen v Rangers 11 May 1946 [61] [62] [63]
Junior Cup 77,650 Hampden Park Petershill v Irvine Meadow 19 May 1951 [64]
Challenge Cup 48,133 Hampden Park Rangers v Peterhead 10 April 2016 [65]

Scotland national team

This section lists the top ten attendances for the Scotland national team in home matches. The attendance of 149,415 for the Scotland vs. England match of 1937 at Hampden Park is a European record. [2]

Scotland national football team Mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

RankAttendanceDateStadiumOpponentCompetitionScore [note 7]
1149,415 [note 8] 17 April 1937 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 3–1
2149,26915 April 1939 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 1–2
3137,43825 April 1970 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 0–0
4135,37610 April 1948 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 0–2
5134,5443 April 1954 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC / WCQG3 2–4
6134,5045 April 1952 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 1–2
7134,1701 April 1933 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 2–1
8134,00024 February 1968 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC / ECQG8 1–1
9133,30015 April 1950 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 0–1
10133,24511 April 1964 Hampden Park Flag of England.svg  England BHC 1–0

European football

The attendance of 136,505 for the 1969–70 European Cup semi-final second leg between Celtic and Leeds United played at Hampden Park is the highest ever for a UEFA competition match. [2] [4]

Hampden Park football stadium

Hampden Park is a football stadium in the Mount Florida area of Glasgow, Scotland. The 51,866-capacity venue serves as the national stadium of football in Scotland. It is the normal home venue of the Scotland national football team and amateur Scottish league club Queen's Park F.C. and regularly hosts the latter stages of the Scottish Cup and Scottish League Cup competitions. It is also used for music concerts and other sporting events, such as when it was reconfigured as an athletics stadium for the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

See also

Notes

  1. Newspaper reports at the time indicate that the officially returned attendance was given as 83,500, with an estimated further 10,000 supporters locked out of the ground for safety reasons. However, the ground's capacity was gauged at the time as being around 88,000 and several subsequent sources (including the club's official website) have since revised the attendance up to 92,000.
  2. Bayview Park refers to the old East Fife stadium, in use prior to 1998, rather than the current Bayview Stadium.
  3. Inverness' record attendance of 9,530 set on 26 October 2004 was set at Pittodrie Stadium, where the club was ground-sharing with Aberdeen.
  4. Gretna's record attendance of 6,137 set on 16 January 2008 was set at Fir Park, where the club was ground-sharing with Motherwell.
  5. The tournament record was set in 1947 when Rangers overcame Hibernian in a semi-final before 123,830.
  6. The Southern League Cup was an unofficial competition held during World War II. The last edition in 1945–46, which despite its name was a nationwide tournament, was held after the end of the conflict, and is considered by winners Aberdeen to be a major trophy.
  7. Scotland's score is shown first.
  8. Some sources list the attendance as 149,547

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