Seat (legal entity)

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In legal English, the seat of any organization is the center of authority. [1] :sense 7

Contents

Commercial

The seat of a corporation is the publicly registered headquarters, [2] or registered office of a corporate entity. Also referred to as the siège reel, or head office. It is the legal center of operations, and the locale which generally determines what laws bind the corporation. [2]

Government

A seat is a competitive position of trust, or public trust, within a government normally filled by election. [1] :sense 7 The politician represents a constituency of citizens, and may hold the seat for a limited term after which the electorate votes once again to fill the seat.

At the time the politician gains authority, the politician is said to be seated. [3] :sense 4 During the politician's term, they are considered to be the sitting trust of that seat. For example, the sitting President of the Australian Senate is Senator the Honorable Scott Ryan. If an incumbent politician fails to win an election, they are said to be unseated.[ citation needed ]

Seats are sometimes[ vague ] associated with a political party.[ citation needed ]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "seat". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
  2. 1 2 "Decision T 1012/03 of December 1, 2006 of Technical Board of Appeal 3.3.05 of the European Patent Office". European Patent Office. 19 April 2007. Reasons 27. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  3. "seated". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.