Section 326 B of the Indian Penal Code

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The Section 326 B in the Indian Penal Code lays down the punishment for attempted acid throwing. The minimum punishment is 5 years imprisonment. It can extend up to 7 years imprisonment with fine. A separate law to punish offenders in such cases was passed along with amendment of law on sexual offences. [1] Such a legislation in line with the laws in other countries like Bangladesh was demanded by various sections of the society for a long time. [2]

Acid throwing form of violent assault

Acid throwing, also called an acid attack, a vitriol attack or vitriolage, is a form of violent assault defined as the act of throwing acid or a similarly corrosive substance onto the body of another "with the intention to disfigure, maim, torture, or kill". Perpetrators of these attacks throw corrosive liquids at their victims, usually at their faces, burning them, and damaging skin tissue, often exposing and sometimes dissolving the bones. Worldwide, the majority of all acid attack victims are male.

Bangladesh Country in South Asia

Bangladesh, officially the People's Republic of Bangladesh, is a country in South Asia. It shares land borders with India and Myanmar (Burma). The country's maritime territory in the Bay of Bengal is roughly equal to the size of its land area. Bangladesh is the world's eighth most populous country as well as its most densely-populated, to the exclusion of small island nations and city-states. Dhaka is its capital and largest city, followed by Chittagong, which has the country's largest port. Bangladesh forms the largest and easternmost part of the Bengal region. Bangladeshis include people from a range of ethnic groups and religions. Bengalis, who speak the official Bengali language, make up 98% of the population. The politically dominant Bengali Muslims make the nation the world's third largest Muslim-majority country. Islam is the official religion of Bangladesh.

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326B: Whoever throws or attempts to throw acid on any person or attempts to administer acid to any person, or attempts to use any other means, with the intention of causing permanent of partial damage or deformity of burns or maiming or disfigurement or disability or grievous hurt to that person, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for aterm which shall not be less than five years, but which may extent to seven years and also be liable to fine.

Explanation 1.- For the purposes of section 326 A and this section, "acid" includes any substance which has acidic or corrosive character or burning nature, that is capable of causing bodily injury leading to scars or disfigurement or temporary or permanent disability.

The Section 326 A in the Indian Penal Code lays down the punishment for acid throwing. The minimum punishment is 10 years' imprisonment. It can extend up to life imprisonment with fine. A separate law to punish offenders in such cases was passed along with amendment of law on sexual offences. Such a legislation in line with the laws in other countries like Bangladesh was demanded by various sections of the society for a long time.

Explanation 2.- For the purposes of section 326 A and this section, permanent or partial damage or deformity shall not be required to be irreversible.'.

See also

Notes

  1. Rama, Lakshmi (27 August 2013). "News World news India India is taking acid attacks more seriously". Guardian Weekly. Washington Post. Retrieved 15 August 2014.
  2. Rajadhyaksha, Madhavi (5 February 2012). "Separate laws for acid attacks needed". The Times of India. Retrieved 15 August 2014.

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