Sedjefakare

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Sedjefakare Kay Amenemhat VII was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 13th dynasty, known from the Turin King List, and several other objects, including six cylinder seals, [2] one bark stand from Medamud [3] and two scarab seals. [4] His name appears as graffito in the tomb of queen Khuit I at Saqqara. Ryholt assigns him without further evidence a reign of 6–7 years. [5]

Ancient Egypt ancient civilization of Northeastern Africa

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient North Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River in the place that is now the country Egypt. Ancient Egyptian civilization followed prehistoric Egypt and coalesced around 3100 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under Menes. The history of ancient Egypt occurred as a series of stable kingdoms, separated by periods of relative instability known as Intermediate Periods: the Old Kingdom of the Early Bronze Age, the Middle Kingdom of the Middle Bronze Age and the New Kingdom of the Late Bronze Age.

Pharaoh ruler of Ancient Egypt

Pharaoh is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire in 30 BCE, although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until Merneptah, c. 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Sedge and Bee (nswt-bjtj) name, and the Two Ladies (nbtj) name. The Golden Horus and nomen and prenomen titles were later added.

The Thirteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt is often combined with Dynasties XI, XII and XIV under the group title Middle Kingdom. Some writers separate it from these dynasties and join it to Dynasties XIV through XVII as part of the Second Intermediate Period. Dynasty XIII lasted from approximately 1803 BC until approximately 1649 BC, i.e. for 154 years.

Contents

Footnotes

  1. Thomas Schneider, Lexikon der Pharaonen, Bibliographisches Institut, Mannheim, 2nd ed. (2002), ISBN   3491960533
  2. Swiss Private Collection; Brooklyn Museum 44.123.77; Ex Hilton Price 4250; New York MMA 10.130.1640, Petrie Museum UCL 11533; Petrie Museum UCL 11534
  3. Cairo JE 15900
  4. Cairo, New York MMA 26.7.85
  5. Ryholt, The Political Situation, p. 408

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References

Preceded by
Sebkay
Pharaoh of Egypt
Thirteenth Dynasty
Succeeded by
Wegaf