Seiichi Kuno

Last updated
Seiichi Kuno
BornMarch 4, 1887
Tokyo, Japan
DiedMarch 13, 1962(1962-03-13) (aged 75)
Allegiance Empire of Japan
Service/branch Imperial Japanese Army
Years of service1905-1945
Rank Lieutenant General
Commands heldIJA 18th Division, IJA 22nd Army
Battles/wars Second Sino-Japanese War

Seiichi Kuno(久納 誠一,Kuno Seiichi, 4 March 1887 – 13 March 1962) was a lieutenant general in the Imperial Japanese Army in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Lieutenant general, lieutenant-general and similar is a three-star military rank used in many countries. The rank traces its origins to the Middle Ages, where the title of lieutenant general was held by the second in command on the battlefield, who was normally subordinate to a captain general.

Imperial Japanese Army Official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan, from 1868 to 1945

The Imperial Japanese Army was the official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan from 1868 to 1945. It was controlled by the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff Office and the Ministry of the Army, both of which were nominally subordinate to the Emperor of Japan as supreme commander of the army and the navy. Later an Inspectorate General of Aviation became the third agency with oversight of the army. During wartime or national emergencies, the nominal command functions of the emperor would be centralized in an Imperial General Headquarters (IGHQ), an ad-hoc body consisting of the chief and vice chief of the Army General Staff, the Minister of the Army, the chief and vice chief of the Naval General Staff, the Inspector General of Aviation, and the Inspector General of Military Training.

Second Sino-Japanese War military conflict between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from 1937 to 1945

The Second Sino-Japanese War was a military conflict fought primarily between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from July 7, 1937, to September 2, 1945. It began with the Marco Polo Bridge Incident in 1937 in which a dispute between Japanese and Chinese troops escalated into a battle. Some sources in the modern People's Republic of China date the beginning of the war to the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931. It is known as the War of Resistance in China.

Contents

Biography

Kuno was a native of Tokyo. He graduated from the 18th class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy in 1905, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the cavalry. He graduated with honors from the 26th class of the Army Staff College in 1914. After serving briefly on the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff, Kuno was assigned as aide-de-camp to Prince Fushimi Sadanaru from 1915-1917. From 1917-1919, he was sent as a military observer to France and with the French Army in Romania during World War I. [1]

Tokyo Capital of Japan

Tokyo, officially Tokyo Metropolis, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan. It served as the Japanese capital since 1869. As of 2018, the Greater Tokyo Area ranked as the most populous metropolitan area in the world. The urban area houses the seat of the Emperor of Japan, of the Japanese government and of the National Diet. Tokyo forms part of the Kantō region on the southeastern side of Japan's main island, Honshu, and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands. Tokyo was formerly named Edo when Shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters in 1603. It became the capital after Emperor Meiji moved his seat to the city from Kyoto in 1868; at that time Edo was renamed Tokyo. The Tokyo Metropolis formed in 1943 from the merger of the former Tokyo Prefecture and the city of Tokyo. Tokyo is often referred to as a city but is officially known and governed as a "metropolitan prefecture", which differs from and combines elements of a city and a prefecture, a characteristic unique to Tokyo.

Imperial Japanese Army Academy Japanese military academy (1874-1945)

The Imperial Japanese Army Academy was the principal officer's training school for the Imperial Japanese Army. The programme consisted of a junior course for graduates of local army cadet schools and for those who had completed four years of middle school, and a senior course for officer candidates.

Cavalry soldiers or warriors fighting from horseback

Cavalry or horsemen are soldiers or warriors who fight mounted on horseback. Cavalry were historically the most mobile of the combat arms. An individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, dragoon, or trooper. The designation of cavalry was not usually given to any military forces that used other animals, such as camels, mules or elephants. Infantry who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title.

After his return to Japan, Kuno served in a number of administrative and staff positions, including that of Secretary to Yamanashi Hanzō, the Governor-General of Korea in 1927.

Yamanashi Hanzō Japanese general

Yamanashi Hanzō was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army, Minister of War and Governor-General of Korea from 1927 to 1929.

Governor-General of Korea position

The Governor-General of Chosen was the chief administrator of the Japanese colonial government in Korea from 1910 to 1945.

From 1927-1929, Kuno commanded the IJA 28th Cavalry Regiment. He was instructor at the Army War College from 1929–1932, and at the Cavalry School from 1932-1933. In 1933, he became Chief of Staff of the IJA 8th Division. In 1934, he was awarded the Order of the Golden Kite, 4th class and the Order of the Rising Sun, 3rd class.

Order of the Golden Kite Japanese order

The Order of the Golden Kite was an order of the Empire of Japan, established on 12 February 1890 by Emperor Meiji "in commemoration of Jimmu Tennō, the Romulus of Japan". It was officially abolished 1947 by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP) during the occupation of Japan, after World War II.

Order of the Rising Sun Japanese order

The Order of the Rising Sun is a Japanese order, established in 1875 by Emperor Meiji. The Order was the first national decoration awarded by the Japanese government, created on 10 April 1875 by decree of the Council of State. The badge features rays of sunlight from the rising sun. The design of the Rising Sun symbolizes energy as powerful as the rising sun in parallel with the "rising sun" concept of Japan.

Kuno was briefly Commandant of the Cavalry School in 1935, before being appointed commander of the IJA 4th Cavalry Brigade. He was promoted to major general in 1936.

Major General is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of Sergeant Major General. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a Lieutenant General outranks a Major General while a Major outranks a Lieutenant.

Kuno became Chief of Staff of the Chosen Army in Korea from 1936–1938, and was thus involved in the dispatch of troops without orders from Tokyo in the Manchurian Incident in the early stages of the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Korea under Japanese rule Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910–1945

Japanese Korea refers to the period when Korea was under Japanese rule, between 1910 and 1945.

Promoted to lieutenant general, from 1938–1940, Kuno commanded the IJA 18th Division, which saw considerable combat during the 1939-40 Winter Offensive. He subsequently commanded the Japanese 22nd Army during the Battle of South Guangxi in 1940. [2] Recalled to Japan in 1940 after the unauthorized invasion of French Indochina, he was forced into retirement from active military service in 1941.

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References

  1. Ammenthorp, The Generals of World War II
  2. Dorn, The Sino-Japanese War 1937-1941

Bibliography