Sergey Litvinov (athlete, born 1958)

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Sergey Litvinov
Sergey Litvinov Sr.jpg
Litvinov in 1980
Personal information
Native nameСергей Николаевич Литвинов
Full nameSergey Nikolaevich Litvinov
NationalityRussian
Born(1958-01-23)23 January 1958
Tsukerova Balka, Krasnodar Krai, Soviet Union
Died19 February 2018(2018-02-19) (aged 60)
Sochi, Krasnodar Krai, Russia
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Weight106 kg (234 lb)
Sport
CountryFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union (1980–1991)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (1992–1993)
SportTrack and field
Event(s)Hammer throw
Club SKA Rostov
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)86.04 m (1986)

Sergey Nikolaevich Litvinov (Russian : Серге́й Никола́евич Литви́нов; 23 January 1958 – 19 February 2018) was a Russian hammer thrower and athletics coach. He competed at the 1980 Summer Olympics and the 1988 Summer Olympics, missing the 1984 Summer Olympics due to the Soviet boycott, and won a silver and a gold medal, respectively. He also won two world titles, in 1983 and 1987. [1] After retiring from competitions he coached elite hammer throwers including Ivan Tsikhan and his son Sergey.

Contents

Career

Throughout his career Litvinov battled with Yuriy Sedykh. Litvinov set three world records, the last being 84.14 metres in June 1983. [2] However, Sedykh improved the world record to 86.34 m in 1984 and to 86.74 m at the 1986 European championships. [3] In 1986 Litvinov threw 86.04 metres which remained his personal best. This result puts him 3rd on the all-time performer's list, behind Sedykh and Ivan Tsikhan, whom he coached. [4]

Litvinov finished second behind Sedykh and ahead of Jüri Tamm in the 1980 Summer Olympics. After missing the 1984 Games because of the Soviet boycott, he won the gold in 1988 ahead of Sedykh; his throw of 84.80 m remains the Olympic record. [5]

Litvinov's son Sergey is also an elite hammer thrower. [5]

Death

Litvinov was reported to have died on 19 February 2018 in Sochi at the age of 60. It was reported by Russia's athletics federation that he suddenly fell from his bicycle as he cycled home from a coaching session, and an ambulance crew was unable to revive him. [6] [5]

International competitions

Source [7]
YearCompetitionVenuePositionNotes
Representing Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
1980 Olympic Games Moscow, USSR 2nd80.64 m
1982 European Championships Athens, Greece 3rd78.66 m
1983 World Championships Helsinki, Finland 1st82.68 m
1984 Friendship Games Moscow, Soviet Union 3rd 81.30 m
1986 Goodwill Games Moscow, Soviet Union 2nd84.64 m
European Championships Stuttgart, West Germany 2nd85.74 m
1987 World Championships Rome, Italy 1st83.06 m = CR
1988 Olympic Games Seoul, South Korea 1st84.80 m = OR
Representing Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
1993 World Championships Stuttgart, Germany 7th78.56 m

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References

  1. "Olympic gold medalist Sergei Litvinov dies at age 60". ESPN. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  2. "Sergey Litvinov". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  3. "86.74 is going to stand for a long time". ESPN. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  4. "Litvinov, former world and Olympic hammer throw champion, dies". IAAF. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  5. 1 2 3 "Olympic hammer champion 'suddenly fell' and died on ride home". CTV. Press Association. 20 February 2018. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  6. "Olympic hammer champion Litvinov passes away". Sports Star Live. AFP. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  7. "Sergey Litvinov". IAAF. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
Records
Preceded by
Yuriy Sedykh
Men's hammer throw world record holder
24 May 1980 – 31 July 1980
Succeeded by
Yuriy Sedykh
Preceded by
Yuriy Sedykh
Men's hammer throw world record holder
4 June 1982 – 3 July 1984
Succeeded by
Yuriy Sedykh