Severn-class lifeboat

Last updated

Severnclass.jpg
The Will (ON 1201)
Class overview
NameSevern class
Builders Berthon Boat Co, Green Marine (Hull Moldings)
Operators Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.svg Royal National Lifeboat Institution
Preceded by Arun-class
Cost£2 million
Built1992–2005
In service1996–
Completed46
Active44
Retired2
General characteristics
Displacement40 t (39 long tons)
Length17.3m (56ft 9in)
Beam5.9m (19ft 4in)
Draught1.78m (5ft 10in)
Propulsion
  • 2 × Caterpillar 3412 TA diesel engines, 1,250 hp (932 kW) each or
  • 2 x MTU 10V2000 M94 engines; 1,600 hp (1,193 kW) (after re-engining)
  • UBW 195 V reverse-reduction gearbox 2.03:1 ratio
  • 5,500 litre (1,200 imperial gallons) fuel capacity
Speed25 knots (29 mph; 46 km/h)
Range250  nmi (460 km)
Capacity
  • Self-righting 47
  • Non-self-righting 185
Complement6
Severn-class lifeboat No. 17-31 at quay in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England, showing its foredeck Lifeboat.bows.17-31.arp.jpg
Severn-class lifeboat No. 17–31 at quay in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England, showing its foredeck

At 17.3 metres (56 ft 9 in) long, the Severn class is the largest lifeboat operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI). Introduced to service in 1996, the class is named after the River Severn, the longest river in Great Britain. They are stationed at 35 locations around the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland to provide coverage up to 50 miles (80 km) out to sea.

Contents

History

In the 1980s the RNLI's fast Arun and Waveney all-weather lifeboats provided coverage 30 miles (48 km) out to sea, operating at up to 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph) to cover the distance in two hours in good weather. However, the RNLI felt that they needed the capability to extend their coverage to 50 miles (80 km) radius, which would require lifeboats with a top speed of 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph). This resulted in the 17-metre (56 ft) Severn and 14-metre (46 ft) Trent lifeboats. [1]

The prototype Severn was launched in 1991 (ON1179) and was named Maurice and Joyce Hardy. Trials started the following year and lasted until 1998. [2] In 1995, the boat was de-named. Problems were encountered during the trials with the "skegs" that protected the propellers, but were designed to protect the hull by breaking off if the boat hit rocks, as the first ones were too easily broken. Crashing through heavy seas at full speed caused damage to the hull, too. [3] It was transferred to training work when it carried operational number TL-02 and was named Peter and Marion Fulton, but was withdrawn in 2004. It was sold in 2005; in 2008 it was in use as a dive boat at Buckie, carrying the name Gemini Storm. [2] Sold to Montrose Marine Services ltd in 2011 and renamed Eileen May. Sold 2019 into private ownership, based North Wales coast.[ citation needed ] The first production Severn was The Will. It had been built in 1995 by Berthon Boat Co (Builders of 21 of the 46 Severn-class lifeboats) for Stornoway but had to undergo several modifications before it was fit for service. It was eventually placed in the relief fleet in 1996 and shown to many lifeboat stations where the class was expected to be deployed. It so impressed the crew at Falmouth that they pressed the RNLI to station it there until their own boat was built, and so it was stationed there from January 1997 until December 2001 when it was replaced by Richard Scott Cox. [4] In the meantime, Tom Sanderson had been deployed at Stornoway in 1999. The Will returned to the relief fleet after its time at Falmouth and has continued in that role since. Construction of its sister boats continued until 2005. [2]

In 2015, the Canadian Coast Guard commissioned a version of the Severn class modified for extreme conditions found off the coast of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. [5]

In 2020 the RNLI started to design a Severn Life Extension Programme (SLEP) with the intention of extending the fleet's lifespan by 25 years. It involves taking an existing boat and fully refitting it from the hull up. The addition of modern electronic systems and shock mitigating seats similar to those found on the Shannon class lifeboats, are among many upgrades. In July 2022 it was announced that the prototype was almost complete and would soon be ready for sea trials. [6]

Description

Severns are constructed of fibre reinforced composite material, and their hard chine semi-displacement hull is built so that it will stay afloat with two of its five compartments flooded. For added manoeuvrability, in addition to twin engines, the Severn also has a bow thruster fitted. [7] The propellers are enclosed so that the Severn can take ground without damaging them. A Y-class inflatable boat can be deployed by an on-board crane for use in shallow water or confined spaces. [8]

Severns have comprehensive electronics systems that include full MF and VHF DSC radio equipment, differential GPS navigator, an electronic chart system, VHF radio direction finder, radar and weather sensors. Provision for survivors includes comprehensive first aid equipment including stretchers, oxygen and Entonox. They carry a portable salvage pump in a water-tight container, and can also carry out pumping and fire-fighting tasks using the engine-driven general service pump.[ citation needed ]

Fleet

ON [lower-alpha 1] Op. No. [lower-alpha 2] NameIn servicePrincipal station MMSI [9] Comments
117917-01Maurice and Joyce Hardy (1992–1995)
Unnamed 1995–1998
Peter and Marion Fulton (1998–2004)
1992–1998
1998–2004
Trials
Training fleet (TL-02)
Sold in 2005. Was named Gemini Storm but now known as Elieen May. [10]
120117-02The Will1996–1997
1997–2001
2001–
Relief fleet
Falmouth
Relief fleet
232001890
120217-03Albert Brown1996– Harwich 232001910
120317-04Spirit of Guernsey1997– St Peter Port 232001940
121617-05Pride of the Humber1997– Humber 232002440
121717-06David Kirkaldy1997– Aran Islands 232002450
121817-07John and Margaret Doig1996– Valentia 232002460
121917-08Helmut Schroder of Dunlossit II1997– Islay 232002470
122017-09City of London II1997– Dover 232002480
122117-10Michael and Jane Vernon1997– Lerwick 232002490
122917-11The Whiteheads1997– St Mary's 232003049
123017-12Edna Windsor1998– Barra Island 232003050
123117-13Margaret Foster1998– Kirkwall 232003051
123217-14Charles Lidbury1998– Aith 232003052
123517-15Bryan and Gordon1998– Ballyglass 232003133
123617-16Violet Dorothy and Kathleen1998– Stromness 232003134
123717-17Fraser Flyer (Civil Service No. 43)1999–Relief fleet232003135
123817–18Tom Sanderson1999– Stornoway 232003136
124117–19Ernest and Mary Shaw1999– Campbeltown 232003139
124217–20Spirit of Northumberland1999– Tynemouth 232003140
124317–21David and Elizabeth Acland1999– Newhaven 232003141
124417–22Myrtle Maud2000– Arranmore 232003142
124717–23Katie Hannan2000–2008 Portrush 232004398Damaged beyond economic repair after grounding on Rathlin Island. [11]
124817–24Bon Accord2000– Aberdeen 232004399
124917–25 Eric and Susan Hiscock (Wanderer) 2001– Yarmouth 232004401
125017–26Henry Alston Hewat2001– Mallaig 232004402
125417–27Volunteer Spirit2001–Relief fleet232004406
125517–28Alec and Christina Dykes2001– Torbay 232004407
125617–29Richard Cox Scott2001– Falmouth 232004408
125717–30William Gordon Burr2002–2008
2008–
Relief fleet
Portrush
232004409
126017–31Roger and Joy Freeman2002–Relief fleet235005115
126117–32Ernest and Mabel2002– Weymouth 235005118
126217–33Beth Sell2002–Relief fleet235005116
126317–34Osier2002–Relief fleet235005119
126417–35Sybil Mullen Glover2003– Plymouth 235005121
126517–36Ivan Ellen2003– Penlee 235005122
126817–37William Blannin2003– Buckie 235007809
126917–38Daniel L Gibson2003–Relief fleet235007799
127017–39Elizabeth Fairlie Ramsey2003– Tobermory 235007798
127117–40Julian and Margaret Leonard2003– Lochinver 235007797
127217–41Christopher Pearce2003– Holyhead 235007796
127317–42The Taylors2004– Thurso 235007795
127617–43Donald and Barbara Broadhead2004– Rosslare Harbour 235010875
127717–44Annette Hutton2004– Castletownbere 235010876
127817–45The Duke of Kent2005–Relief fleet235013842
127917–46Margaret Joan and Fred Nye2004–Relief fleet235010878
  1. ON is the RNLI's Official Number of the boat.
  2. Op. No. is the RNLI's Operational Number of the boat carried on the hull.

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References

  1. Wake-Walker, Edward (2008). The Lifeboats Story. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. pp. 59–72. ISBN   978-0-7509-4858-6.
  2. 1 2 3 Denton, Tony (2009). Handbook 2009. Shrewsbury: Lifeboat Enthusiasts Society. pp. 32–35.
  3. Kipling, Ray; Kipling, Susannah (2006). Never Turn Back. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. pp. 92–93. ISBN   978-0-7524-9596-5.
  4. Morris, Jeff (2002). The History of the Falmouth Lifeboats (2nd ed.). Coventry: Lifeboat Enthusiast's Society. pp. 30–40.
  5. "New Robert Allan lifeboats". Maritime Journal. 15 July 2013. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 22 July 2015.
  6. RNLI (July 2022). "Severn Life Extension Programme RNLI update". RNLI. Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  7. "Severn Class Lifeboat Information". RNLI. Retrieved 2 September 2013.
  8. Wake-Walker, Edward (2008). The Lifeboats Story. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. pp. 110–111. ISBN   978-0-7509-4858-6.
  9. "Particulars of Ship stations". www.itu.int. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  10. "Elieen May Facebook Page" . Retrieved 4 September 2019.
  11. "Station history". RNLI Lifeboats. Royal National Lifeboat Institution. Year 2008. Retrieved 16 December 2016.