Seymour Friedman

Last updated
Seymour Friedman
BornAugust 17, 1917
DiedApril 2, 2003 (aged 85)
Los Angeles, California
United States
OccupationDirector

Seymour Friedman (August 17, 1917 – April 2, 2003) was an American film director. He later worked as a production manager in television. Friedman began his career as an assistant director, before enlisting for military service following America's entry into World War II. He directed his first film, Trapped by Boston Blackie , in 1948. [1] Like many of the other films he directed, it was a low-budget series film. In the early 1950s, Friedman went to Britain to make a couple of films, before returning to Hollywood. He directed his last film in 1956, and switched to working entirely in television.

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Blottner p.66-67

Bibliography