Shōwa Restoration

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The Shōwa Restoration (昭和維新 shōwaishin) was promoted by Japanese author Kita Ikki, with the goal of restoring power to the newly enthroned Japanese Emperor Hirohito and abolishing the liberal Taishō democracy. [1] The aims of the "Showa Restoration" were similar to the Meiji Restoration as the groups who envisioned it imagined a small group of qualified people backing up a strong Emperor. The Cherry Blossom Society envisioned such a restoration. [2]

The February 26 Incident was an attempt to bring it about, failing heavily because they were unable to secure the support of the Emperor. [3] The chief conspirators surrendered in the hope to make their trial advance the cause, a hope which was foiled by the trials being conducted secretly. [4]

Although all such attempts failed, it was a first step on the rise of Japanese militarism.

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References

  1. James L. McClain, Japan: A Modern History p 414 ISBN   0-393-04156-5
  2. James L. McClain, Japan: A Modern History p 415 ISBN   0-393-04156-5
  3. Meirion and Susie Harries, Soldiers of the Sun: The Rise and Fall of the Imperial Japanese Army p 188 ISBN   0-394-56935-0
  4. Meirion and Susie Harries, Soldiers of the Sun: The Rise and Fall of the Imperial Japanese Army p 193 ISBN   0-394-56935-0