Shahbaz (bird)

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Derafsh-e Shahbaz-e-Talayi
(Persian : drfsh shhbz Tlyy
)
Standard of Cyrus the Great
(Zoroastrian Achaemenid Empire). Standard of Cyrus the Great (Achaemenid Empire).svg
Derafsh-e Shahbaz-e-Talayi
(Persian : درفش شاه‌باز طلایی)
Standard of Cyrus the Great
(Zoroastrian Achaemenid Empire).

Shahbaz (Persian : شاه‌باز) is the name of a fabled bird. It is like an eagle, bigger than a hawk or falcon. The shahbaz lived in the Zagros, Alborz, and Ghafghaz mountains of Iran. In old Persian mythology, Shahbaz was a god who helped the Iranians and guided Faravahar to Iran zamin. During the Achaemenid era, especially at the time of Cyrus the Great, the Persian imperial flag was rectangular in shape, divided kite-like into four equal triangles alternating between two colors. In the excavations at Persepolis archaeologists found a standard depicting a Shahbaz or golden eagle (Derafsh-e Shahbaz-e-Talayi) with open wings. The current belief is that this was the official symbol of Iran under Cyrus the Great and his heirs.

Persian language Western Iranian language

Persian, also known by its endonym Farsi, is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran. It is written right to left in the Persian alphabet, a modified variant of the Arabic script, which itself evolved from the Aramaic alphabet.

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Bird Warm-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates with wings, feathers and beaks

Birds, also known as Aves, are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world's most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds. The digestive and respiratory systems of birds are also uniquely adapted for flight. Some bird species of aquatic environments, particularly seabirds and some waterbirds, have further evolved for swimming.

Shahbaz literally means "royal falcon". [1] [2] Burton considered it to refer to the Goshawk, Accipiter gentilis. [1] "shahbaz" may also refer to the eastern imperial eagle which is known as imperial eagle (Persian : عقاب شاهی) which is the second largest (after the golden eagle) eagle in Iran.

Northern goshawk species of bird

The northern goshawk is a medium-large raptor in the family Accipitridae, which also includes other extant diurnal raptors, such as eagles, buzzards and harriers. As a species in the genus Accipiter, the goshawk is often considered a "true hawk". The scientific name is Latin; Accipiter is "hawk", from accipere, "to grasp", and gentilis is "noble" or "gentle" because in the Middle Ages only the nobility were permitted to fly goshawks for falconry.

Eastern imperial eagle species of bird

The eastern imperial eagle is a large bird of prey that breeds in southeastern Europe, West and Central Asia. Most populations are migratory and winter in northeastern Africa and South and East Asia. The global population is small and declining due to persecution, loss of habitat and prey. It has therefore been IUCN Red Listed as Vulnerable since 1994.

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Achaemenes was the apical ancestor of the Achaemenid dynasty of rulers of Persia.

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Shahbaz is a Persian word referring to the fabled guardian Shahbaz which also implies "King's Own Royal Falcon." Specifically in merchant trade, an adult female Accipiter gentilis caught wintering in Khorasan and trained in Falconry is called Shahbaz and is esteemed by connoisseurs in South Asia for hunting small-game.

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The Persian Empire refers to any of a series of imperial dynasties that were centred in Persia/Iran from the 6th century BC Achaemenid Empire era to the 20th century AD in the Qajar dynasty era.

Achaemenid architecture

Achaemenid architecture includes all architectural achievements of the Achaemenid Persians manifesting in construction of spectacular cities used for governance and inhabitation, temples made for worship and social gatherings, and mausoleums erected in honor of fallen kings. The quintessential feature of Persian architecture was its eclectic nature with elements of Assyrian, Egyptian, Median and Asiatic Greek all incorporated, yet producing a unique Persian identity seen in the finished product. Achaemenid architecture is academically classified under Persian architecture in terms of its style and design.

Achaemenid Empire first Persian Empire founded by Cyrus the Great

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Sarab-e Shahbaz village in Lorestan, Iran

Sarab-e Shahbaz is a village in Honam Rural District, in the Central District of Selseleh County, Lorestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 33, in 10 families.

Sukhur-e Shahbaz-e Najafi village in Kermanshah, Iran

Sukhvor-e Shahbaz-e Najafi is a village in Heydariyeh Rural District, Govar District, Gilan-e Gharb County, Kermanshah Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 95, in 15 families.

Sukhur-e Shahbaz-e Shiri village in Kermanshah, Iran

Sukhvor-e Shahbaz-e Shiri is a village in Heydariyeh Rural District, Govar District, Gilan-e Gharb County, Kermanshah Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 400, in 81 families.

References

  1. 1 2 Burton, Sir Richard Francis (1852). Falconry in the valley of the Indus.
  2. Brill, E. J. First Encyclopaedia of Islam 1913-1936.