Shanghai Expeditionary Army

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Shanghai Expeditionary Army
JapaneseStormNanjing.jpg
Japanese troops enter Nanjing
Active1932, 1937-1938
Country Empire of Japan
Branch Imperial Japanese Army
Type Infantry
Role Corps
Garrison/HQ Nanjing
Engagements Battle of Shanghai, Battle of Nanjing

The Shanghai Expeditionary Army (上海派遣軍, Shanhai-haken-gun) was a corps-level ad hoc Japanese army in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Contents

The Shanghai Expeditionary Army was first raised on February 25, 1932 as a reinforcement for Japanese forces involved during the First Battle of Shanghai. It was dissolved in June 1932, after the conclusion of that incident. Ethnic Chinese soldiers from the Taiwan Army were part of this army, and they were led by Iwane Matsui. [1] [2]

The Shanghai Expeditionary Army was raised a second time on August 15, 1937 on the eruption of full scale hostilities between the Empire of Japan and the Republic of China. Its forces participated in the Second Battle of Shanghai, and the subsequent drive inland to the Battle of Nanking. Troops from this army were also involved in the subsequent Nanjing Massacre. [2]

The Shanghai Expeditionary Army was disbanded on February 1, 1938, and its component units were incorporated into the Japanese Central China Area Army.

Organization 1932

See: Order of Battle January 28 Incident

Organization 1937-1938

See: Order of battle of the Battle of Shanghai

List of commanders

Commanding officer

NameFromTo
1General Yoshinori Shirakawa 25 February 193229 April 1932
XDisbanded
2General Iwane Matsui 15 August 19372 December 1937
3Lieutenant General Prince Asaka Yasuhiko 2 December 193714 February 1938

Chief of Staff

NameFromTo
1Lieutenant General Kanichiro Tashiro 25 February 193229 April 1932
XDisbanded
2Lieutenant General Mamoru Iinuma15 August 193714 February 1938

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References

  1. Takashi Hayasaka, 松井石根と南京事件の真実 (Tokyo: Bungei Shunjū, 2011), 67. ISBN   9784166608171
  2. 1 2 "Taiwan - Taiwan as part of the Japanese empire". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2020-01-22. The Taiwanese worked in Japan’s defense and war-related industries in Taiwan and in other ways abetted Japan’s war efforts. Many Taiwanese served in the Japanese military, including units that fought in China. Taiwanese troops even participated in the atrocities against Chinese civilians at Nanjing (Nanking) and other places on the mainland. Of the Taiwanese who served in the Japanese military, more than 30,000 were killed in combat.