Shannon Boxx

Last updated

Shannon Boxx
Shannon Boxx Warmup.jpg
Personal information
Full nameShannon Leigh Boxx
Date of birth (1977-06-29) June 29, 1977 (age 41)
Place of birth Fontana, California, United States
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Playing position Midfielder
College career
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1995–1998 Notre Dame Fighting Irish 101 (39)
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1994 Ajax of Los Angeles
1999 Boston Renegades
1999–2000 1. FC Saarbrücken
2000 Ajax of Los Angeles
2001–2002 San Diego Spirit 41 (5)
2003 New York Power 21 (1)
2005 Ajax of Los Angeles
2009 Los Angeles Sol 19 (3)
2010 Saint Louis Athletica 6 (1)
2010 FC Gold Pride 14 (0)
2011 magicJack 10 (0)
2013–2015 Chicago Red Stars 7 (0)
National team
2003–2015 United States 195 (27)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league onlyand correct as of August 21, 2014
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of October 21, 2015

Shannon Boxx (born June 29, 1977) [1] is an American retired soccer player and former member of the United States women's national soccer team, playing the defensive midfielder position. She last played club soccer for the Chicago Red Stars in the American National Women's Soccer League. She won gold medals with the United States at the 2004 Athens Olympics, 2008 Beijing Olympics, and 2012 London Olympics. She has also finished third place or better with the USA at the 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015 FIFA Women's World Cups. She was a finalist for the 2005 FIFA World Player of the Year award, and won an NCAA Women's Soccer Championship with Notre Dame in 1995. Shannon Boxx announced her retirement from international and club soccer after winning the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. [2] She played her last game on October 21, 2015 when the USWNT tied with Brazil as part of their victory tour. [3]

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cup wins, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Chicago Red Stars soccer team and National Womens Soccer League franchise in Chicago, Illinois, USA

The Chicago Red Stars is an American professional soccer club based in Chicago, competing in the National Women's Soccer League, who play their home games in SeatGeek Stadium. The team was a founding member of Women's Professional Soccer, and played in the league in 2009 and 2010. After leaving the WPS in December 2010, due to financial issues, the team reorganized and joined the Women's Premier Soccer League for the 2011 season. In 2012, the team competed in Women's Premier Soccer League Elite, the single year this league existed. Since 2013, the team has been competing in National Women's Soccer League.

National Womens Soccer League professional soccer league, highest level of womens soccer in the United States

The National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) is a professional women's soccer league, run by the United States Soccer Federation. At the top of the United States league system, it represents the sport's highest level in the United States. The NWSL was established in 2012 as a successor to Women's Professional Soccer (2007–2012), which was itself the successor to Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003). The league began play in 2013 with eight teams, four of which were former members of Women's Professional Soccer. With the addition of two expansion teams in Houston and Orlando and the loss of Boston Breakers, it now has nine teams throughout the United States.

Contents

Boxx is the younger sister of Gillian Boxx, who won a gold medal at the 1996 Olympics with the United States softball team. [4]

Gillian Dewey Boxx won an Olympic gold medal as a catcher on the United States women's national softball team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. Boxx played collegiate softball at the University of California at Berkeley from 1992 to 1995, where she was a first-team All-America selection in 1993 and 1995, and set seven school records.

Women’s Softball made its first appearance as an official medal sport at the 1996 Summer Olympics. The competition was held at historic Golden Park in Columbus, Georgia, United States. Final results for the Softball competition at the 1996 Summer Olympics:

Early life

The multiracial Boxx, whose biological father, was black, was raised by her white single mother in Southern California. In a 2008 interview, she remembered that she had little contact with her African American heritage until she went to Notre Dame: [5]

University of Notre Dame Catholic university in South Bend, Indiana, United States

The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a private, non-profit Catholic research university in Notre Dame, Indiana. The main campus covers 1,261 acres (510 ha) in a suburban setting and it contains a number of recognizable landmarks, such as the Golden Dome, the Word of Life mural, the Notre Dame Stadium, and the Basilica. The school was founded on November 26, 1842, by Father Edward Sorin, CSC, who was also its first president.

For me, I really learned about my other half. I took African American studies. I majored in it. I think that was one of the best things I could have ever done. My mom couldn't teach me those things. So I went and taught myself and learned those things when I was at Notre Dame.

Youth Club

From U/12-U/18, [6] Boxx played for the Torrance United Waves Soccer Club, Torrance, California, and helped to lead them to 4 State Cup Championships and two trips to the USYSA National Championship Final Four in 1993 and 1994 [7] [8] at U/17 and U/19.

Torrance, California City in California

Torrance is a U.S. city in the South Bay (southwestern) region of Los Angeles County, California in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Torrance has 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of beaches on the Pacific Ocean. Torrance has a moderate year-round climate with warm temperatures, sea breezes, low humidity, and an average rainfall of 12.55 inches per year.

High school

From 1991 to 1995, Boxx attended South Torrance High School, where she was a four-sport athlete, playing soccer, volleyball, softball and basketball. She was named to the Parade All-America team for girls' soccer in 1995. [9]

<i>Parade</i> (magazine) American Sunday newspaper magazine

Parade is an American nationwide Sunday newspaper magazine, distributed in more than 700 newspapers in the United States. It was founded in 1941 and is owned by Athlon Media Group, which purchased it from Advance Publications. The most widely read magazine in the U.S., Parade has a circulation of 32 million and a readership of 54.1 million. As of 2015, its editor is Anne Krueger.

College

Boxx played for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish from 1995 to 1998. She helped the team win the school's first NCAA Women's Soccer Championship in 1995, beating defending champions North Carolina in the semifinal. Boxx was named to the All-Big East team in 1995, 1996 and 1997, and is tied for the most soccer games played for the Irish at 101 games. [9]

Notre Dame Fighting Irish intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Notre Dame

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish are the athletic teams that represent the University of Notre Dame. The Fighting Irish participate in 23 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I intercollegiate sports and in the NCAA's Division I in all sports, with many teams competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Notre Dame is one of only 16 universities in the United States that plays Division I FBS football and Division I men's ice hockey. The school colors are Gold and Blue and the mascot is the Leprechaun.

The NCAA Women's Soccer Championship refers to one of three championships in women's soccer contested by the NCAA since 1981:

North Carolina Tar Heels intercollegiate sports teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States. Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname ""Carolina", especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels. The female athletic teams are sometimes referred to as Lady Tar Heels.

College statistics

CollegeGP/GSGoalsAssistsTotal pointsWin–Loss–Tie
Notre Dame 199525/217102421–2–2
Notre Dame 199626/2512164024–2–0
Notre Dame 199725/2513174323–1–1
Notre Dame 199825/257142821–3–1

Professional career

1999–2000

In 1999, Boxx played for the Boston Renegades of the W-League, and then went to Germany to play for 1. FC Saarbrücken in the women's Bundesliga. However, she was unhappy and considered retiring from soccer. [10]

WUSA

In 2001, Women's United Soccer Association began play, and Boxx was drafted by the San Diego Spirit in the third round of the entry draft, with the 19th pick overall. [9]

In the 2001 season, Boxx started all 21 matches for the Spirit, missing 20 minutes of the entire season, and was named to the All-WUSA team. [10] However, her playing time was reduced the following season, and in September 2002, she was sent to the New York Power, in a six-player trade that gave San Diego the first overall pick in the 2003 draft, used to select Aly Wagner. [11]

With New York, Boxx returned to form, starting all 21 games, scoring once and assisting a career-high eight times, and was named to the 2003 All-WUSA squad. [12] Former women's national team coach and league commissioner Tony DiCicco called Boxx "the best in our league at (defensive midfield) – physical, strong, technical". [10]

WUSAGP/GSMINGoalsAssistsTotal pointsWin–Loss–Tie
San Diego Spirit 200121/21187035117–7–7
San Diego Spirit 200220/1513492265–11–5
New York Power 200321/21186818107–9–5

WPS

Shannon Boxx with Saint Louis Athletica in 2010. Shannonbox2010-5-15.jpg
Shannon Boxx with Saint Louis Athletica in 2010.

In 2009, Boxx signed to the Los Angeles Sol for the inaugural season of Women's Professional Soccer and was named team captain. She started in 18 of the 19 matches she played for the Sol, scoring three goals with three assists. Boxx was named to the WPS First Team and played in the WPS All-Star Game. The Sol finished in first place during the regular season with a 12–3–5 record. [9]

In 2010, she was signed to the Saint Louis Athletica during the Los Angeles Sol dispersal draft. [13]

Later in the season after Saint Louis Athletica folded, she was traded to the FC Gold Pride. [14] Boxx helped the team win the WPS regular season title and championship. She started in 19 of the 20 games she played in, while scoring one goal and providing five assists. She was a WPS All-Star Game starter and received the fifth overall votes. [9]

For the 2011 WPS season, Boxx signed with magicJack and played 833 minutes in 10 games starting in them all. She helped the club make a run to the playoffs in the second half of the season and win the quarterfinal match against the Boston Breakers. [9]

NWSL

In 2013, she joined Chicago Red Stars in the new National Women's Soccer League. Due to injury Boxx played 2 matches in 2013, played in 5 matches in 2014 due to pregnancy and birth of her first child, and in 2015 played 4 times due World Cup duties. On July 27, 2015, Boxx announced retirement from NWSL and Red Stars effective immediately. [15]

International career

Boxx and the USWNT celebrate after a goal in the Gold medal match against Japan, at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Back to front: Boxx-7, Wambach-14, O'Hara-5, Morgan-13, Lloyd-10 Association football at the 2012 Summer Olympics 006.jpg
Boxx and the USWNT celebrate after a goal in the Gold medal match against Japan, at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Back to front: Boxx-7, Wambach-14, O'Hara-5, Morgan-13, Lloyd-10

Although Boxx was a member of the United States Under-21 national team pool, she did not receive her first senior cap until August 2003, when U.S. national team coach April Heinrichs named her to the team's 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup squad, making her the first uncapped player to be named to a U.S. Women's World Cup squad. [12] Prior to the call-up, following the suspension of WUSA, Boxx had planned to take a coaching position at Cal State-Dominguez Hills and pursue a graduate degree at Pepperdine University. [12]

Boxx scored a goal in each of the two pre-World Cup friendlies, against Costa Rica and Mexico, and in the opening match of the World Cup against Sweden, Boxx became the first American woman to score three goals in her first three matches with the national team. [10]

Boxx started five matches at the Women's World Cup, scoring again against Canada in the third place match. She was voted the player of the match against Canada by the FIFA Technical Study Group, who said Boxx "seized control of the game, spurred on her team-mates and finally scored the decisive goal in USA's victory". [4]

Boxx started 31 of 32 national team matches she played in 2004, including all six matches at the 2004 Olympics, where she scored a goal, assisted on another and helped the team win a Gold Medal. [9] She scored eight goals over the course of the year, including a hat trick against Trinidad and Tobago in an Olympic qualifying match. Boxx came in seventh in the voting for the 2004 FIFA World Player of the Year award.

In 2005, Boxx started all nine matches US national team matches, playing all but 23 minutes of all matches played. She was a finalist for the 2005 FIFA World Player of the Year, coming in third behind Birgit Prinz and Marta. [16]

Boxx missed most of 2006, first for surgery to repair torn cartilage in her right hip, and then for torn medial collateral ligaments she suffered on her first day back in training with the national team. [17] She returned in 2007 after an eight-month layoff, and was named to the United States' squad for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. Boxx helped the team reach the semifinal match against Brazil, but she was sent off after receiving two yellow cards, and the United States went on to lose 4–0. [18] Boxx played every minute of all five U.S. games in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.

In 2011, she played in all but one of the world cup games, earning defensive team honors for her efforts throughout the tournament. During the World Cup final against Japan, which went to overtime penalty shoot-out, Boxx was one of the Americans elected to take one of the penalty kicks, and had her shot saved by Japan's goalkeeper. [19]

(*Correct as of December 15,2012)

International goals

DateLocationOpponentLineup#MinAssist/passScoreResultCompetition
12003-09-01 [m 1] Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 1.153 Julie Foudy

5350.03005 3–0

5550.05005 5–0

Friendly
22003-09-07 [m 2] Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico

off 61' (on Hucles)

1.110 Julie Foudy

5150.01005 1–0

5550.05005 5–0

Friendly
32003-09-21 [m 3] Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1.178 Mia Hamm

5250.03005 3–1

5250.03005 3–1

World Cup: Group A
42003-10-11 [m 4] Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 1.151 Mia Hamm

5150.02005 2–1

5250.03005 3–1

World Cup: third place match
52004-01-30 [m 5] Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1.113 Kristine Lilly

5150.01005 1–0

5350.03005 3–0

Four Nations Tournament
62004-02-25 [m 6] Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad & Tobago 3.122 Abby Wambach

5150.01005 1–0

5750.07005 7–0

Olympic qualification
73.237 Mia Hamm

5350.03005 3–0

83.381 Aly Wagner

5750.07005 7–0

92004-03-03 [m 7] Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica

off 60' (on Tarpley)

1.151 Shannon MacMillan

5450.04005 4–0

5450.04005 4–0

Olympic qualification: semifinal
102004-07-21 [m 8] Flag of Australia.svg  Australia

on 46' (off Chastain)

1.156 Mia Hamm

5050.01005 1–1

5250.03005 3–1

Friendly
112004-08-11 [m 9] Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 1.114 Mia Hamm

5150.01005 1–0

5350.03005 3–0

Olympics: Group G
122004-12-08 [m 10] Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 1.144unassisted

5450.04005 4–0

5550.05005 5–0

Friendly
132005-07-23 [m 11] Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland

off 82' (on Woznuk)

1.169 Abby Wambach

5350.03005 3–0

5350.03005 3–0

Friendly
142006-01-18 [m 12] Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1.177 Kristine Lilly

5250.02005 2–0

5250.03005 3–1

Four Nations Tournament
152007-07-28 [m 13] Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

off 85' (on Hucles)

1.117 Stephanie Lopez

5150.01005 1–0

5350.04005 4–1

Friendly
162007-08-25 [m 14] Flag of Finland.svg  Finland

off 79' (on Wagner)

1.130 Kristine Lilly

5150.01005 1–0

5450.04005 4–0

Friendly
172007-09-22 [m 15] Flag of England.svg  England

off 82' (on Lloyd)

1.157 Cat Whitehill

5250.02005 2–0

5350.03005 3–0

World Cup: quarterfinal
182008-01-20 [m 16] Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1.177 Becky Sauerbrunn

5150.01005 1–0

5150.01005 1–0

Four Nations Tournament
192009-03-11 [m 17] Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1.190 Megan Rapinoe

5050.01005 1–1

5049.0103 1–1(pso 3–4)

Algarve Cup: final
202009-05-25 [m 18] Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 1.12 Heather Mitts

5150.01005 1–0

5450.04005 4–0

Friendly
212010-03-28 [m 19] Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 1.143unassisted

5250.02005 2–0

5350.03005 3–0

Friendly
222011-03-07 [m 20] Flag of Finland.svg  Finland

off 46' (on Lindsey)

1.18 Carli Lloyd

5150.01005 1–0

5450.04005 4–0

Algarve Cup: Group A
232012-04-03 [m 21] Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1.123 Lauren Holiday

5250.02005 2–0

5350.03005 3–0

Kirin Challenge Cup
242012-09-16 [m 22] Flag of Australia.svg  Australia

on 46' (off Lloyd)

1.163penalty

5150.02005 2–1

5150.02005 2–1

Friendly
252012-09-19 [m 23] Flag of Australia.svg  Australia

on 46' (off Holiday)

1.163 Megan Rapinoe

5350.05005 5–2

5450.06005 6–2

Friendly
262013-02-09 [m 24] Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland

off 66' (on Averbuch)

1.152 Christen Press

5350.03005 3–0

5350.04005 4–1

Friendly
272013-03-06 [m 25] Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 1.162 Christie Rampone

5250.02005 2–0

5350.03005 3–0

Algarve Cup: Group B

Video Games

Boxx was featured along with her national teammates in the EA Sports' FIFA video game series in FIFA 16 , the first time women players were included in the game. [20]

Ticker Tape Parade and White House Honor

Following the United States' win at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, Boxx and her teammates became the first women's sports team to be honored with a Ticker Tape Parade in New York City. [21] Each player received a key to the city from Mayor Bill de Blasio. [22] In October of the same year, the team was honored by President Barack Obama at the White House. [23]

See also

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Match reports
  1. "U.S. Rolls Past Costa Rica 5–0 on Road to Women's World Cup". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 30, 2012.
  2. "Five Different Players Score as U.S. Tops Mexico, 5–0, in Final Pre-Cup Match". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 30, 2012.
  3. "Hamm's Three Assists Lead U.S. Past Sweden in Opener". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 27, 2012.
  4. "U.S. Women's National Team Downs Canada, 3–1, to Take Third Place in FIFA Women's World Cup". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 24, 2012.
  5. "Tarpley Scores Two as WNT Downs Sweden 3–0 in Opener of Four Nations Tournament in China on Friday". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 22, 2012.
  6. "U.S. WNT Dominate Trinidad and Tobago 7–0". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 23, 2012.
  7. "U.S. WNT Defeat Costa Rica 4–0 to Qualify for 2004 Olympics". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 23, 2012.
  8. "U.S. Women Defeat Australia, 3–1, as Mia Hamm Scores 150th Career Goal". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 23, 2012.
  9. "U.S. Olympic Women's Soccer Team Downs Greece 3–0 in Opening Match of Olympics". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 14, 2012.
  10. "Hamm, Foudy Close Careers With 5–0 Victory Over Mexico". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 23, 2012.
  11. "Fotopoulos Scores Twice as U.S. Women Defeat Iceland, 3–0". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 23, 2012.
  12. "Lilly Earns 300th Cap as U.S. Women Defeat Norway, 3–1, to Open Four Nations Tournament". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on July 27, 2012.
  13. "U.S. Women Defeat Japan, 4–1, at Spartan Stadium in San Jose". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  14. "U.S. Women Defeat Finland, 4–0, at The Home Depot Center; U.S. Finish Domestic Schedule Undefeated and Now Head To The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  15. "U.S. Women Score Three Times in 13 Minutes During Second Half to Blow Open Quarterfinal and Defeat England, 3–0, to Advance to Semifinal of 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on April 25, 2012.
  16. "U.S. WNT Wins 2008 Four Nations Tournament With 1–0 Victory Against China". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  17. "Sweden Edges U.S. Women on Penalties in Algarve Final". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  18. "U.S. Women Score Twice In Each Half to Defeat Canada 4–0 at BMO Field in Toronto". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on October 13, 2013.
  19. "USA Defeats Mexico 3–0 in First Domestic Match of 2010". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012.
  20. "U.S. Women Put Four Past Finland in Group A Finale". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  21. "Carli Lloyd, Shannon Boxx and Amy Rodriguez Score as the U.S. Women's National Team Downs Brazil 3–0 in Chiba, Japan". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012.
  22. "U.S. Women's National Team Comes Back to Defeat Australia 2–1 at The Home Depot Center". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on September 18, 2012.
  23. "U.S. Women's National Team Provides Head Coach Pia Sundhage with 6–2 Victory in Final Match in Charge". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014.
  24. "U.S. Women's National Team Begin Year with 4–1 Win against Scotland". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on February 14, 2013.
  25. "U.S. WNT Opens the 2013 Algarve Cup with 3–0 Win Against Iceland". U.S.Soccer. Archived from the original on October 30, 2013.