Shimizugawa Motokichi

Last updated
Shimizugawa Motokichi
清水川 元吉
Shimizugawa.jpg
Personal information
Born長尾 与楽(Nagao Yonesaku)
(1900-01-13)13 January 1900
Goshogawara, Aomori, Japan
Died5 July 1967(1967-07-05) (aged 67)
Tokyo, Japan
Height1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Weight97 kg (214 lb)
Career
Stable Hatachiyama
Record272-157-48-1draw-8holds
DebutJanuary 1917
Highest rankŌzeki (May 1932)
RetiredMay 1937
Championships 3 (Makuuchi)
2 (Jūryō)
* Up to date as of June 2008.

Shimizugawa Motokichi(清水川 元吉,Shimizugawa Motokichi, 13 January 1900 – 5 July 1967) was a Japanese sumo wrestler from Goshogawara, Aomori, Japan. His highest rank was ōzeki.

Contents

Career

Making his debut in January 1917, he was promoted to the top makuuchi division in January 1923 and made the fourth komusubi rank in January 1926, although he did not take part in that tournament. He competed in the maegashira ranks in 1927 but left the Japan Sumo Association temporarily and was not listed on the banzuke ranking sheets in the March and May 1928 tournaments. Returning in October 1928 he was listed at the bottom of the jūryō division and after winning two jūryō tournament titles he returned to the top division in 1930.

Shimizugawa was promoted to the second highest rank of ōzeki in 1932 but never made the highest yokozuna rank, despite winning a total of three top division tournament championships. He was overlooked for promotion while two men with inferior records to him, Musashiyama and Minanogawa, were both promoted to yokozuna instead. It has been suggested that this was because Shimizugawa belonged to a small stable, Hatachiyama, whereas Musashiyama and Minanogawa were both members of much larger and more influential stables (Dewanoumi and Takasago, respectively). [1]

Retirement from sumo

After finishing as runner-up in the May 1937 tournament, his fifth runner-up performance, Shimizugawa announced his retirement. He remained in the sumo world as an elder under the name Oitekaze Oyakata, and was head coach of the Oitekaze stable. Among the wrestlers he produced was a komusubi to whom he gave his old shikona or fighting name, Shimizugawa Akio.

Career Record

Shimizugawa Motokichi [2]
-Spring
Haru basho, varied
Summer
Natsu basho, varied
1917(Maezumo)(Maezumo)
1918EastJonokuchi#25
32
 
EastJonidan#70
41
 
1919WestJonidan#17
31
1h

 
EastSandanme#32
41
 
1920WestSandanme#3
41
 
EastMakushita#28
22
1h

 
1921EastMakushita#26
31
1h

 
EastMakushita#19
31
1h

 
1922EastJūryō#13
21
2h

 
WestJūryō#3
43
 
1923WestMaegashira#15
27
1h

 
EastJūryō#4
63
 
1924WestMaegashira#13
45
1h

 
WestMaegashira#12
47
 
1925WestMaegashira#15
83
 
EastMaegashira#5
821
1d

 
1926EastKomusubi#1
0011
 
WestMaegashira#4
83
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira
-Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
March
Sangatsu basho, varied
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
October
Jūgatsu basho, varied
1927EastMaegashira#1
38
 
EastMaegashira#1
38
 
WestMaegashira#7
0011
 
EastMaegashira#5
0011
 
1928EastMaegashira#12
0011
 
Left JSA Left JSAMakushita#1
43
 
1929EastJūryō#12
83
 
EastJūryō#12
101
Champion

 
WestJūryō#1
110
Champion

 
WestJūryō#1
83
 
1930EastMaegashira#8
65
 
EastMaegashira#8
74
 
WestMaegashira#3
38
 
WestMaegashira#3
92
 
1931EastKomusubi#1
56
 
EastKomusubi#1
47
 
WestMaegashira#3
101
 
WestMaegashira#3
65
 
1932WestSekiwake#1
80
 
WestSekiwake#1
82
 
EastŌzeki#2
101
 
EastŌzeki#2
92
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira
-Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
Autumn
Aki basho, Tokyo
1933EastŌzeki#1
56
 
WestŌzeki#1
74
 
Not held
1934WestŌzeki#1
74
 
WestŌzeki#1
110
 
Not held
1935EastŌzeki#1
56
 
WestŌzeki#2
74
 
Not held
1936WestŌzeki#1
47
 
WestŌzeki#1
65
 
Not held
1937WestŌzeki#1
65
 
WestŌzeki#1
Jun-Yusho·Retired
103*
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Key:d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

*Shimizugawa was runner-up in his final tournament in May 1937

See also

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References

  1. Kuroda, Joe (October 2006). "Rikishi of Old:Minanogawa Tozo". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 9 June 2008.
  2. "Shimuzugawa Motokichi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 11 June 2013.