Shotwick Park

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Shotwick Park
Shotwick Castle.jpg
Shotwick Castle earthworks
Cheshire UK location map.svg
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Shotwick Park
Location within Cheshire
OS grid reference SJ354711
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CHESTER
Postcode district CH1
Dialling code 01244
Police Cheshire
Fire Cheshire
Ambulance North West
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Cheshire
53°13′59″N2°57′58″W / 53.233°N 2.966°W / 53.233; -2.966 Coordinates: 53°13′59″N2°57′58″W / 53.233°N 2.966°W / 53.233; -2.966

Shotwick Park is a small settlement and former civil parish, in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. Located between the villages of Shotwick and Saughall, it is approximately 8 km (5.0 mi) north west of Chester and close to the Welsh border. The civil parish was abolished on 1 April 2015 to form Saughall and Shotwick Park, with part also incorporated into the parish of Puddington. [1]

Contents

The area is the location of the remnants of Shotwick Castle (grid reference SJ349704 ), built about 1093 by Hugh Lupus, 1st Earl of Chester. [2] This Norman motte and bailey fortification was constructed as part of the Welsh border defences in the area. The land surrounding the castle became enclosed as a park in 1327. [2] [3] By the 1620s, the castle was in a ruinous condition. [3] [4]

According to the 1831 edition of A Topographical Dictionary of England, Shotwick Park was "an extra-parochial liberty" within the Wirral Hundred. The liberty comprised "970 acres, the soil of which is clay." [4] It became a civil parish in 1858. The population was recorded at 25 in 1801, 13 in 1851, 8 in 1901, 78 in 1951 and 56 in 2001. [1]

Shotwick Park is a rural residential area with communal amenities provided in the nearby village of Saughall. A small industrial estate development also exists at Shotwick Park.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Shotwick Park". GENUKI UK & Ireland Genealogy. Retrieved 28 April 2018.
  2. 1 2 "History of Saughall". Saughall & Shotwick Park Parish Council. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  3. 1 2 "Shotwick Castle". Historic England. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  4. 1 2 Lewis, Samuel (1831). "Shoston - Showell". A Topographical Dictionary of England. British History Online. pp. 90–93. Retrieved 22 July 2020.

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