Shyane

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Location within north Tipperary LocationOfShyaneCivilParishWithinNorthTipperary.jpg
Location within north Tipperary
Townlands in the parish TownlandsInShyaneCivilParishNorthTipperary.jpg
Townlands in the parish

Shyane (Irish : An Sián meaning a fairy mound) is a civil parish in County Tipperary, Ireland. [1] It is one of 21 civil parishes in the historical barony of Eliogarty. It is divided into three townlands: Clobanna (containing a little over 243 acres), Rossestown (a little over 587 acres) and Coolgarrane (a little over 77 acres). [2] [3]

Church of Ireland parish

Like all civil parishes, this civil parish is derived from, and co-extensive with a pre-existing Church of Ireland parish of the same name. (However, the Ecclesiastical Annals for the Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel say that the parish was sometimes called Templeshyane [4] ).

The first Ordnance Survey map of the area shows a graveyard and the ruins of Templeshyane church in the north-eastern corner of Clobanna townland, with one parcel of glebe land surrounding them and another parcel of glebe land in the southern part of the townland. [5]

An article in volume 42 of the Dublin University Magazine, dated 1853, refers to the church and graveyard as Templeshane, which it translates to English as "John's Church". [6]

Although by the time of the first Ordnance survey Shyane parish was divided into three townlands, the Ecclesiastical Annals for the Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel say that there was only one townland, which it named "Clotanna", in the parish. [7]

Writing in 1837, Lewis said that the vicarage of Shyane was "partly united, by act of council, in 1682" to the living of the Church of Ireland parish of Thurles. [8]

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References

  1. Placenames Database of Ireland - Shyane civil parish.
  2. Griffith's Valuation for Shane Civil Parish, 1849
  3. Extract from Ordnance Survey map
  4. John Caillard Erck, The ecclesiastical register: containing the names of the dignitaries and parochial clergy of Ireland : as also of the parishes and their respective patrons and an account of monies granted for building churches and glebe-houses with ecclesiastical annals annexed to each diocese and appendixes : containing among other things several cases of quare impedit, (1927), page 153
  5. Extract from Ordnance Survey map
  6. The Dublin University Magazine, Volume 42, 91853), page 212
  7. John Caillard Erck, The ecclesiastical register: containing the names of the dignitaries and parochial clergy of Ireland : as also of the parishes and their respective patrons and an account of monies granted for building churches and glebe-houses with ecclesiastical annals annexed to each diocese and appendixes : containing among other things several cases of quare impedit, (1927), page 153
  8. Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, (1837), page 623