Siege of Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier

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Siege of Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier
Part of the Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War
DateOctober–November 4, 1429
Location 46°47′30″N3°07′08″E / 46.7917°N 3.1189°E / 46.7917; 3.1189 Coordinates: 46°47′30″N3°07′08″E / 46.7917°N 3.1189°E / 46.7917; 3.1189
Result French victory
Belligerents
Arms of France (France Moderne).svg France Blason fr Bourgogne.svg Burgundians
Commanders and leaders
Joan of Arc
Charles d'Albret
Perrinet Gressard

The Siege of Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier was a venture of the so-called Lancastrian War. The small town was however heavily fortified and surrounded by a deep moat. According to Joan of Arc's bodyguard, Jean d'Aulon, the initial assault failed and the retreat was sounded. Joan managed to initiate a second assault which, according to d'Aulon, was meet 'without much resistance'. d'Aulon had been wounded in the heel during the initial assault and was therefore probably mounted on his horse during the second assault. [1]

As the aim to take all enemy strongholds on the Loire banks was put forward, the besieging of Saint-Pierre-le-Moûtier was adopted. Joan and Charles d'Albret united the forces at Bourges and proceeded onwards to Saint-Pierre-le-Moutier. The defenders put up a vigorous defence. Nonetheless, the town was eventually taken by assault. [2] When the town was captured, Charles VII bestowed on Joan noble status. [3] On August 24, 1902, a statue of Joan of Arc was unveiled in the city.

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References

  1. Oliphant, Margaret (1896). Jeanne d'Arc: Her life and death. eBook.
  2. "The letter to the people of Riom". Saint-joan-of-arc.com.
  3. Lester, Meera (2005). Saints' Blessings. Fair Winds. p.  76. ISBN   1-59233-138-6.