Siege of Trarbach

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An engraving depicting the bombardment of Trarbach and the Grevenburg Bombardirung Trarbach.jpeg
An engraving depicting the bombardment of Trarbach and the Grevenburg

The Siege of Trarbach (10 April – 2 May 1734) was conducted during the War of the Polish Succession by French troops against a garrison of troops of the Holy Roman Empire in the fortress at Trarbach in the County of Sponheim, a small principality of the Holy Roman Empire (Trarbach is now in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany). The French, led by Marshal Belle-Isle, were victorious, and destroyed the fortress.

War of the Polish Succession war in Europe 1734–1738

The War of the Polish Succession (1733–35) was a major European war sparked by a Polish civil war over the succession to Augustus II, which the other European powers widened in pursuit of their own national interests. France and Spain, the two Bourbon powers, attempted to check the power of the Austrian Habsburgs in western Europe, as did the Kingdom of Prussia, whilst Saxony and Russia mobilized to support the eventual Polish victor. The slight amount of fighting in Poland resulted in the accession of Augustus III, who in addition to Russia and Saxony, was politically supported by the Habsburgs.

Holy Roman Empire varying complex of lands that existed from 962 to 1806 in Central Europe

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Grevenburg castle ruin

Grevenburg was a castle in Traben-Trarbach in the federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany. The castle was formerly the residence of the Rear County of Sponheim and today is a ruin following its destruction by the French in 1734.

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