Sima Zhen

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Sima Zhen
Traditional Chinese 司馬貞
Simplified Chinese 司马贞

Sima Zhen (Chinese :司馬貞; Wade–Giles :Ssu-ma Chen; 679–732), courtesy name Zizheng (Tzu-cheng; 子正), was a Tang dynasty Chinese historian born in what is now Jiaozuo, Henan.

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Sima Zhen was one of the most important commentators on the Shiji . [1] His commentary is known as the Shiji Suoyin (史記索隱), which means "Seeking the Obscure in the Records of the Grand Historian". [2]

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References

  1. Durrant, Stephen W. The Cloudy Mirror: Tension and Conflict in the Writings of Sima Qian. SUNY Press. p. xx.
  2. Zhu, Dongrun (1940). Sima Zhen Shiji Suoyin Shuolie. Chengdu: Kaiming Shudian. pp. 141–163.

Further reading