Siorac-de-Ribérac

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Siorac-de-Ribérac
Siorac de Riberac - Fireworks for village fete 2008.JPG
Fireworks light up the village at its annual fete
Blason Siorac-de-Riberac.svg
Coat of arms
Location of Siorac-de-Ribérac
Siorac-de-Riberac
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Siorac-de-Ribérac
Aquitaine-Limousin-Poitou-Charentes region location map.svg
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Siorac-de-Ribérac
Coordinates: 45°11′54″N0°21′32″E / 45.1983°N 0.3589°E / 45.1983; 0.3589 Coordinates: 45°11′54″N0°21′32″E / 45.1983°N 0.3589°E / 45.1983; 0.3589
Country France
Region Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Department Dordogne
Arrondissement Périgueux
Canton Ribérac
Government
  Mayor (20202026) Jean-Pierre Chaumette [1]
Area
1
20.86 km2 (8.05 sq mi)
Population
 (Jan. 2018) [2]
248
  Density12/km2 (31/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
24537 /24600
Elevation73–105 m (240–344 ft)
(avg. 177 m or 581 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Siorac-de-Ribérac is a commune in the Dordogne department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of southwestern France.

Contents

Geography

The commune of Siorac-de-Ribérac lies in the forest of the Double, in the west of the Dordogne department. It is bounded on its south side for about 4 km by the Rizonne stream, which separates it from the neighbouring communes of Saint-André-de-Double and Saint-Vincent-de-Connezac.

The soil is composed in part of Eocene and Oligocene sands, clays and gravels, [3] and in part of chalk of the Campanian period. [4]

The commune's lowest point, at 73 m, is to the south-west where the Rizonne leaves the commune for Vanxains and La Jemaye. The highest point, at 195 m, is to the north-east, at The Temple, at the boundary with Saint-Martin-de-Ribérac.

Church

Siorac's romanesque church dates from the 12th and 14th centuries Siorac de Riberac romanesque church.jpg
Siorac's romanesque church dates from the 12th and 14th centuries

The village church of St Peter in Chains began in 1154, during the English period in the region, Aquitaine. The 12th century freestone nave and bell tower survived. At that time, the church was part of the Benedictine priory of the nuns of Ligueux. In the 14th century, during the Hundred Years' War between England and France, the defensive rectangular tower was added, using quarry stone. At the same time, the walls and bell tower were increased in height, again with quarry stone. The walls at the west entrance are believed to be 3 metres thick. A bell was provided in 1851; it was replaced in 1979. The nave originally had a wooden vault; it has been replaced by a stone vault. [5]

Population

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1962 249    
1968 270+8.4%
1975 226−16.3%
1982 228+0.9%
1990 227−0.4%
1999 265+16.7%
2008 258−2.6%

See also

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References

  1. "Répertoire national des élus: les maires". data.gouv.fr, Plateforme ouverte des données publiques françaises (in French). 2 December 2020.
  2. "Populations légales 2018". INSEE. 28 December 2020.
  3. Florence Broussaud-Le Strat, La Double Un pays en Périgord, page 12, Éditions Fanlac, 2006. (in French)
  4. "Siorac-de-Riberac: Late/Upper Campanian, France". Paleobiology Database. Naturkundemuseum Berlin. Archived from the original on 17 December 2012. Retrieved 14 October 2012.
  5. The Church of Siorac. Leaflet (English and French), Siorac-de-Ribérac church, 2012.

Sources