Sir Abraham Cullen, 1st Baronet

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Sir Abraham Cullen, 1st Baronet (c.1624-1668), of East Sheen Surrey, was an English merchant and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1668.

Cullen was the eldest son of Abraham Cullen, merchant, of Great St Helens, London and his first wife. Abigail Moonens, daughter of Martin Moonens, hosier, of Norwich, Norfolk. He married at St Dionis Backchurch on. 10 December 1650 Abigail Rushout, daughter of John Rushout, Fishmonger, of London and Marylords, Essex and his first wife Anne Godschalk, daughter of Joas Godschalk of London. He succeeded his father in 1658. [1] He became a captain of the foot militia for Surrey in April 1660, and a Justice of the Peace in July 1660.

Cullen was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Evesham at the 1661 English general election to the Cavalier Parliament. On 17 June 1661, he was created baronet. He was a Commissioner for assessment for London and Surrey for the rest of his life from 1661 and a Commissioner for assessment for Evesham from 1663 to 1664. [2]

Evesham was a parliamentary constituency in Worcestershire which was represented in the British House of Commons. Originally a parliamentary borough consisting of the town of Evesham, it was first represented in 1295. After this its franchise lapsed for several centuries, but it then returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) from 1604 until 1868, when its representation was reduced to one member under the Representation of the People Act 1867.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Cullen baronets

The Cullen Baronetcy, of East Sheen, was created in the Baronetage of England on 17 June 1661 for Abraham Cullen, Member of Parliament for Evesham 1661–1668.

In Parliament, Cullen was appointed to 22 committees, most of which were concerned with commerce or finance. He was one of the Members appointed to inspect the accounts of the disbandment commissioners. He was on the committee for the Wey Navigation bill promoted by his colleague William Sandys in 1664. His only recorded speech was on 6 March 1668, when he proposed a tax on coaches, but no one would second his proposal. [2]

William Sandys, known as Waterworks Sandys, was an English politician. He was MP for Evesham in three Parliaments from 1640 until 1669. During the English Civil War he lived as an exile in France, procuring arms for the Royalist cause. He was a notable waterworks engineer, who improved the River Avon and the River Wye, and who was involved in various ways in several other river navigation schemes.

Cullen died intestate on 28 August 1668 and was buried on 2 September at Mortlake. He had three surviving sons and six daughters by his wife Abigail. She died in 1678 and was also buried at Mortlake. He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his eldest son John and then by his second son Rushout. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Cokayne, George Edward, ed. (1903), Complete Baronetage volume 3 (1649-1664), 3, Exeter: William Pollard and Co, retrieved 9 October 2018
  2. 1 2 "CULLEN, Abraham (c.1624-68), of East Sheen, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Egioke
Sir Thomas Rouse
Member of Parliament for Evesham
1661–1668
With: William Sandys
Succeeded by
William Sandys
Sir John Hanmer
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
New Creation
Baronet
(of East Sheen)
1661-1668
Succeeded by
Sir John Cullen, 2nd Baronet