Sir George Savile, 7th Baronet

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Sir George Savile, 7th Baronet of Thornhill FRS (10 February 1678 – 16 September 1743), of Rufford Nottinghamshire, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1728 to 1734.

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Rufford Abbey Rufford Hall from SW.JPG
Rufford Abbey

Savile was the son of Rev. John Savile, rector of Thornhill, Yorkshire and his second wife Barbara Jenison, daughter of Thomas Jenison of Newcastle. He was admitted at Middle Temple in 1691 and matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford in 1696. He succeeded his cousin Sir John Savile, 6th Baronet in 1704, inheriting Rufford Abbey. He had two sisters; Ann and Gertrude. [1]

Middle Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Christ Church, Oxford constituent college of the University of Oxford in England

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Christ Church is a joint foundation of the college and the Cathedral of the Oxford diocese, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.

Rufford Abbey

Rufford Abbey is a country estate in Rufford, Nottinghamshire, England, some 2 miles (4 km) south of Ollerton. Originally a Cistercian abbey, it was converted to a country house in the 16th century after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Part of the house was demolished in the 20th century, but the remains, standing in 150 acres of park and woodland, are open to the public as Rufford Country Park. Part of the park is a Local Nature Reserve.

Savile was appointed High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire for the year 1706 to 1707. He was returned as Member of Parliament (MP) for Yorkshire at a by-election in 1728 and sat until the 1734 British general election. [2]

The High Sheriff is the oldest secular office under the Crown. Formerly the High Sheriff was the principal law enforcement officer in the county but over the centuries most of the responsibilities associated with the post have been transferred elsewhere or are now defunct, so that its functions are now largely ceremonial. The High Sheriff changes every March.

Yorkshire was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England from 1290, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament, traditionally known as Knights of the Shire, until 1826, when the county benefited from the disfranchisement of Grampound by taking an additional two members.

1734 British general election

The 1734 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 8th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Robert Walpole's increasingly unpopular Whig government lost ground to the Tories and the opposition Whigs, but still had a secure majority in the House of Commons. The Patriot Whigs were joined in opposition by a group of Whig members led by Lord Cobham known as the Cobhamites, or 'Cobham's Cubs'

Savile was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in November, 1721. [3]

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science and medical science'.

Savile married Mary Pratt, the daughter of John Pratt of Dublin (but reputedly the natural daughter of Henry Petty, 1st Earl of Shelburne) and had three children; Arabella, George (8th Baronet), and Barbara, who married Richard Lumley-Saunderson, 4th Earl of Scarbrough. [1]

Henry Petty, 1st Earl of Shelburne PC (I) was an Anglo-Irish peer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1715 to 1727.

Sir George Savile, 8th Baronet English politician

Sir George Savile, 8th Baronet of Thornhill FRS was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1759 to 1783.

Richard Lumley-Saunderson, 4th Earl of Scarbrough PC was a British peer, styled Viscount Lumley from 1740 to 1752.

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References

  1. 1 2 George Edward Cokayne Complete Baronetage 1900
  2. "SAVILE, Sir George, 7th Bt. (1678-1743), of Rufford, Notts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 2013-03-20.
  3. "Library Archive". Royal Society. Retrieved 2013-03-20.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Watson-Wentworth
Cholmley Turner
Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
1728 – 1734
With: Cholmley Turner
Succeeded by
Cholmley Turner
Sir Miles Stapylton, Bt
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
John Savile
Baronet
(of Thornhill)
1701–1743
Succeeded by
George Savile