Sir John Williams, 2nd Baronet, of Llangibby

Last updated

Sir John Williams, 2nd Baronet (c. 1651 – November 1704) [1] was a Welsh Member of Parliament, representing the constituencies of Monmouth Boroughs (February 1689 – 1690) [1] and Monmouthshire (1698–1704). [1]

Monmouth Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency consisting of several towns in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England, Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom; until 1832 the constituency was known simply as Monmouth, though it included other "contributory boroughs".

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

He was one of the Williams baronets. He succeeded Sir Trevor Williams, 1st Baronet [1] and was succeeded by Sir Hopton Williams, 3rd Baronet. [1]

Williams baronets

There have been twenty baronetcies created for persons with the surname Williams, eight in the Baronetage of England, three in the Baronetage of Great Britain and nine in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Only five of the creations are extant as of 2017..

Sir Trevor Williams, 1st Baronet of Llangibby, Monmouthshire, was a Welsh gentry landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1660 and 1692. He played a significant part in events during and after the English Civil War in South Wales, siding first with King Charles, then with the Parliamentarians, before rejoining the Royalists in 1648.

Related Research Articles

Sir Robert Rich, 4th Baronet British cavalry officer

Field Marshal Sir Robert Rich, 4th Baronet was a British cavalry officer. As a junior officer he fought at the Battle of Schellenberg and at the Battle of Blenheim during the War of the Spanish Succession. He was then asked the raise a regiment to combat the threat from the Jacobite rising of 1715. He also served with the Pragmatic Army under the Earl of Stair at the Battle of Dettingen during the War of the Austrian Succession. As a Member of Parliament he represented three different constituencies but never attained political office.

Earl of Galloway

Earl of Galloway is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1623 for Alexander Stewart, 1st Lord Garlies, with remainder to his heirs male bearing the name and arms of Stewart. He had already been created Lord Garlies in the Peerage of Scotland in 1607, with remainder to the heirs male of his body succeeding to the estates of Garlies. This branch of the Stewart family were distant relatives of the Stewart King of Scotland.

Earl of Romney

Earl of Romney is a title that has been created twice.

Earl of Cromartie

Earl of Cromartie is a title that has been created twice, both for members of the Mackenzie family. It was first created as Earl of Cromarty in the Peerage of Scotland in 1703 for Sir George Mackenzie, 2nd Baronet, but his titles were forfeited after the Jacobite rising of 1745. It was recreated in 1861 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom for Anne Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland. Since 1979, the Earl of Cromartie has been chief of Clan Mackenzie.

Earl of Sussex is a title that has been created several times in the Peerages of England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. The early Earls of Arundel were often also called Earls of Sussex.

Viscount Bulkeley

Viscount Bulkeley, of Cashel in the County of Tipperary, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 19 January 1644 for Thomas Bulkeley, the son of Sir Richard Bulkeley of Beaumaris and a supporter of King Charles I of England. The title descended from father to son until the death of his great-great-grandson, the 5th Viscount, in 1738. The late Viscount was childless and was succeeded by his younger brother, the 6th Viscount. The latter was succeeded by his son, the 7th Viscount. The 7th Viscount was also created Baron Bulkeley, of Beaumaris, in the County of Anglesey, in the Peerage of Great Britain on 14 May 1784, which entitled him to a seat in the House of Lords. In 1802 he assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Warren, which was that of his father-in-law, Sir George Warren. On his death in 1822 both titles became extinct. Sir Richard Williams, of Penrhyn, succeeded to the Bulkeley estates and assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Bulkeley.

Sir James Campbell, 2nd Baronet of Ardkinglass, was a British Army officer and Scottish politician who sat in the Parliament of Scotland from 1703 to 1707 and in the British House of Commons from 1707 to 1741.

There have been four Abdy baronetcies:

Sir William Williams, 2nd Baronet was a politician in the United Kingdom Great Britain. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Denbigh Boroughs.

The Buckworth, later Buckworth-Herne, later Buckworth-Herne-Soame Baronetcy, of Sheen in the County of Surrey, is a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 1 April 1697 for John Buckworth, High Sheriff of London in 1704. The second Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Weobley. The third Baronet was Assistant Gentleman Usher to George II. The fifth Baronet was Gentleman-Pensioner and Exon of the Guard during the reign of George III. He married Anne, daughter of Paston Herne, of Haveringland Hall, Norfolk, and assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Herne. The sixth Baronet assumed in 1806 by Royal licence the additional surname of Soame in compliance with the will of Sir Peter Soame, 4th Baronet, of Thurlow. The ninth Baronet was a member of the Shropshire County Council. As of 2014, the title is held by the thirteenth baronet, who succeeded his father in 2013.

Sir John Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet British baronet

Sir John Trevelyan, 2nd Baronet of Nettlecombe, Somerset was a British politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1695 and 1722.

Sir Thomas Butler, 3rd Baronet of Cloughgrenan, was an Irish baronet and politician.

Sir John Williams, 2nd Baronet, of Elham (1653–1723), was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1701 to 1705.

Earl Tylney

Earl Tylney, of Castlemaine in the County of Kerry, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 11 June 1731 for Richard Child, 1st Viscount Castlemaine. The Child family descended from the merchant, economist and colonial administrator Josiah Child, who on 16 July 1678 was created a baronet, of Wanstead in the County of Essex, in the Baronetage of England. The first Baronet was succeeded by his son from his second marriage, Sir Josiah Child, 2nd Baronet.

Sir Christopher Musgrave, 4th Baronet was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1704, and briefly became Father of the House in 1704 as the member with the longest unbroken service.

Sir John Cordell, 3rd Baronet was an English politician.

Gervase Eyre was an English MP for Nottinghamshire.

Sir Christopher Musgrave, 5th Baronet of Eden Hall, Cumbria was an English baronet and politician.

Sir Robert Gordon, 3rd Baronet (1647–1704) was a Scottish courtier and politician.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Leigh Rayment's list of baronets – Baronetcies beginning with "W" (part 2)
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Arnold
Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs
1689–1690
Succeeded by
Sir Charles Kemeys
Preceded by
Thomas Morgan
Sir Charles Kemeys
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1698–1704
With: Thomas Morgan 1698–1701
John Morgan 1701–1704
Succeeded by
John Morgan
Sir Hopton Williams
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Trevor Williams
Baronet
(of Llangibby)
1692–1704
Succeeded by
Hopton Williams