Sir Richard Wrottesley, 7th Baronet

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Richard Wrottesley
Born(1721-06-19)19 June 1721
Wrottesley Hall, Staffordshire, England
Died20 July 1769(1769-07-20) (aged 48)
England
Alma materSt John's College, Oxford
Matric. 31 August 1739
Known for Member of Parliament
Dean of Worcester
Spouse(s) Lady Mary Leveson-Gower (1717–1778)
ChildrenMary Wrottesley (1740–1769)
Frances Wrottesley (1743–1811)
John Wrottesley (1744–1787)
Elizabeth Wrottesley (1745–1822)
Dorothy Wrottesley (1747)
Harriet Wrottesley (1754–1824)
Parent(s)Sir John Wrottesley
Frances Grey

Sir Richard Wrottesley, 7th Baronet (19 June 1721 – 20 July 1769) of Wrottesley Hall in Staffordshire, was a Member of Parliament, Anglican clergyman and Dean of Worcester. [1]

Contents

Biography

He was born a younger son of Sir John Wrottesley, 4th Bt., MP, by Frances, the daughter of the Hon. John Grey, MP of Enville and educated at Winchester School (1736–38) and St. John's College, Oxford (1739), later transferring to Queens' College, Cambridge. He succeeded his elder brother Sir Walter Wrottesley as baronet in 1732. [2]

It is said that when Bonny Prince Charlie was marching south through England during the course of his rebellion, Sir Richard, a regular duellist, armed his tenants and gathered his servants to do battle but he reportedly never got further than a local inn, The Bull at Codsall, where his small team of men spent a convivial week. [3]

He became M.P. for Tavistock in December 1747, holding the seat until 1754. He was appointed a Clerk of the Green Cloth from 1749 to 1754.

He became a Church official, being appointed minister of St Michael's in Tettenhall. [3] He was appointed chaplain in ordinary to the King, George III, in 1763 and collated Dean of Worcester for life in 1765.

He married Lady Mary Leveson-Gower, the daughter of John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower and Evelyn Pierrepont, in 1739. They had five daughters.

He died in 1769.

See also

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References

  1. "Personal Facts and Details". Stanford University . Retrieved 3 October 2012.External link in |publisher= (help)
  2. "WROTTESLEY, Sir Richard, 7th Bt. (1721–69), of Wrottesley, Staffs". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 12 June 2016.
  3. 1 2 "Rev Sir Richard Wrottesley 7th Baronet". Stepney Robarts. 15 June 2012. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Tavistock
1747–1754
With: Thomas Brand
Succeeded by
Church of England titles
Preceded by Dean of Worcester
1765–1769
Succeeded by
Baronetage of England
Preceded by Baronet
(of Wrottesley)
1731–1769
Succeeded by